Malawi

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events (EAD, 1998, 2002a, 2004). The Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Report of 2001 (EAD, 2002b) has clearly indicated that Malawi is experiencing a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others.

Currently, the majority of rural communities are experiencing chronic food deficits in many parts of the country on a year-round-basis owing to the effects of floods and droughts. This situation has been compounded by the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS that has created a large number of dependant orphans, and has also adversely impacted on rural household food production systems, as well as the quality of life and sustainable livelihoods.

The increasing prevalence of the recurrent floods and droughts is of major concern to the Government of Malawi because of their far-reaching consequences on food, water, health and energy. Erratic rains have resulted in acute crop failure, despite concerted efforts to improve seasonal weather forecasting at the beginning of the rainy season. Crop failure has resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition, especially among vulnerable rural communities. On the other hand, floods have resulted in the disruption of hydroelectric power generation, water pollution, and increased incidences of diseases, such as malaria, cholera and diarrhea. It is against this background that the government has put in place several policies and strategies to address the adverse impacts of climate change on food, water, health and energy, as articulated in Vision 2020, MPRSP, and the Malawi Economic Growth Strategy (MEGS), among many other documents.

Related Content

Map of Project Location

This map documents the location of project activities that comprise the project "Saving Lives and Protecting Agriculture based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling Up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems".

Gender, Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Africa

Women represent the main source of agricultural labour in Africa (Denton, 2002) and the fact that agriculture in tropical and subtropical areas is one of the sectors most vulnerable to climate change (Mendelsohn et al., 2006) explains why some women remain vulnerable and poor. In fact, women represent the majority of people living on less than a dollar a day (Denton, 2002; UNDP, 2010). For instance, women account for 65 percent of smallholder farmers in Zambia and they are particularly exposed to food insecurity. Therefore, providing them with agricultural advice informed by climate and weather information is of crucial importance (ActionAid, 2015).

Moreover, because of systemic inequities between women and men, there are commonly, but wrongfully, held views that women’s economic, political and social status is inferior to that of men. Consequently, women have been traditionally absent from decision-making processes regarding climate policy (Lambrou and Piana, 2006). Furthermore, cultural norms have also affected the ability of women to adapt to climate change because of the restrictions these norms impose on women (UNDP, 2010). This is counterintuitive since women are more dependent on natural resources for their livelihoods than men are and this renders them more vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Considering this context, several UNDP-GEF projects on adaptation and in particular on climate information and early warning systems (CI/EWS) have been designed to incorporate gender aspects in their implementation. On the one hand, the projects aim to invest in women’s empowerment within the national hydromet and disaster risk reduction services and on the other hand, the objective is to ensure women’s access to climate information and early warnings for adaptation purposes.

In what follows, country-specific highlights of the CI/EWS projects are presented.

Zambia

To start with, the CI/EWS project in Zambia is targeting communities in districts where women are most vulnerable to climate change. Besides this, women working at the Zambian Meteorology Department have benefited from several short- as well as long-term training courses. Specifically, 3 out of 12 staff members being sponsored to undertake a three-year diploma programme in weather forecasting, data processing, analysis and climate applications at the Zambian Air Services Training Institute are women. This represents progress in terms of gender empowerment as meteorology has been a traditionally male-dominated profession in Zambia. Moreover, there have been significant efforts to balance the participation of men and women in all of the short-term training courses organized by the project and in particular, the aim has been to count at least 30 percent female participants. Similarly, 30 percent of the project’s leadership at the community level is represented by women. Furthermore, by means of supporting the generation of hydro-meteorological and environmental information, the project is enabling Zambia’s Disaster Mitigation and Management Services to conduct vulnerability assessments and effectively carry out relief interventions from which women and children are the main beneficiaries due to their disproportionately high exposure to risk. Last but not least, preliminary findings from a national project-led survey revealed that women and men are nowadays equally using weather information for decision-making and they represent 41% of the surveyed population. This is a marked improvement from previous records suggesting no use of such information.

Malawi

In Malawi, the CI/EWS project integrates gender considerations by making sure that women are adequately involved in the implementation of the early warning systems and that they benefit from climate information which is relevant to them, presented and transmitted in a way that is accessible and easy to understand. Specifically, the climate data collected by the 10 newly installed weather stations benefits men, women, children and vulnerable groups equally. Moreover, since women have been traditionally responsible for water collection in rural Malawi, they will also benefit from the improved management of water resources that this project is facilitating. Furthermore, gender-sensitive household surveys will verify that women are targeted accordingly by the established systems. To date, thanks to this LDCF project, women have benefited from various sessions on sensitisation and awareness creation in early warning systems and disaster risk management which were carried out in the Chikwawa, Dedza, Kasungu, Mangochi, Nkhatabay, Nkhotakota, Nsanje, Phalombe, Rumphi, Salima and Zomba districts. Out of the 550 community members that have participated, 302 were women. Lastly, several training sessions have also been organised for the Civil Protection Committees of 11 districts, namely: Chikwawa, Dedza, Karonga, Mangochi, Nkhatabay, Nkhotakota, Nsanje, Phalombe, Rumphi, Salima and Zomba. They have all targeted men, women and youth equally.

Uganda

To ensure an effective early warning system that caters to all vulnerable persons in a community, the sites for the implementation of the CI/EWS project in Uganda have been all selected while being mindful of gender assessments. A toolkit for the dissemination of early warnings is being developed and it will include a gender-based analysis of the national and local media that are used to disseminate weather and climate alerts. Moreover, based on gender-sensitive consultations with end-users, the project aims to supply climate information that is tailored to the specific needs of decision makers and local communities.

With an objective in mind to ensure gender mainstreaming at all levels of project execution, 3 of the 11 Project Board members and 5 of the 12 Technical Committee members are women. Moreover, 30 percent of the participants in the sub-National Committee are women and in fact, all of the meetings and workshops organized by the project have had a minimum of 30 percent participation from women. Furthermore, in terms of human capacity and women’s empowerment in the context of national hydromet and disaster risk reduction services, the project reported the following:

  • 12 staff members working at Uganda’s synoptic stations have been trained on the use of the recently installed equipment: barometers, thermometers and sunshine cards. 7 of them were women.
  • 7 staff members from Uganda’s National Meteorological Authority (UNMA) have been trained by the supplier itself on the operation of the newly acquired automatic weather stations. 2 of them were women.
  • 27 UNMA staff members have received training on the operation of the automatic message switching system. 6 of them were women.
  • 12 smartphones were delivered to each of UNMA’s 12 synoptic stations. The recipients have also been trained on the use of smartphones to relay weather data to the National Meteorological Centre. 7 of them were women.
  • 23 staff members from UNMA and the Directorate of Water Resources Management (DWRM) have been trained in Kenya or India on weather data management and flood forecasting. 3 of them were women.
  • 8 staff members from UNMA, the Office of the Prime Minister, the Ministry of Agriculture Animal Industry and Fisheries and DWRM have been trained to become trainers themselves on hazards and vulnerability mapping. 3 of them were women.

The project is also adopting an evidence-based approach to evaluating its impact and the first step has been to collect baseline data. A survey was conducted for this purpose and 6 out of the 16 data collectors were women. A second round of data collection is planned for the end of the project and it will be mindful of gender aspects.

Last but not least, various events for awareness-creation regarding adaptation to climate change in the agricultural sector have been organised and 12 of the 30 UNMA members that were involved in their organisation were women. 

All in all, an increasing number of female staff members at UNMA and DWRM have acquired the hydromet skills that are necessary to make use of new technologies in Uganda. What is more, their role is only to increase upon the gender-sensitive implementation of activities following the installation of the newly purchased equipment. In addition, there will be opportunities for women to be trained as data collectors and analysts. Gender-based associations as well as NGOs will be increasingly involved in the dissemination and interpretation of early warnings and climate information. As the project matures, it will emphasize the gender component of emergency-response planning and districts as well as municipalities will be monitored for gender mainstreaming into plans for the management of hazards.

Ethiopia

In Ethiopia, a survey conducted by the National Meteorological Agency revealed that women are making use of climate information to a significantly lesser extent than men are. In this context, the Agency emphasizes the need for increased awareness at the level of local communities, in schools and during stakeholder meetings. In fact, women and young staff have been encouraged to participate in national capacity building sessions as well as in regional workshops. Moreover, with the purpose of ensuring the local ownership of the newly acquired automatic weather stations, the project implementation team has conducted participatory consultations with local representatives and sought out the input of women.

Benin

The CI/EWS project in Benin has invested in public campaigns to increase awareness of project activities, early warning systems and the importance of community involvement in the maintenance and protection of hydromet stations. 740 people have participated, of which 125 were women. Moreover, the project has been supporting the involvement of NGOs in the efforts to strengthen gender equality, as measured by the ability of women to react to extreme weather and adapt to climate change. Whenever studies to inform project activities have been commissioned, the inclusion of women in the various research teams was a requirement. Women have also been encouraged to participate in project interventions and management committees and to voice their suggestions and concerns regarding the effectiveness of climate and early warning systems in Benin. Specifically, this UNDP-GEF project has been working with CARE International to promote activities dedicated to strengthening the capacity of women to use and capitalize climate information in the north-east region of Benin.

Concluding Note

The projects discussed above are young and therefore, progress was particularly noticeable in terms of the improved skills and increased presence of women in the national hydromet and disaster risk reduction services. However, as the projects mature and the systems disseminating climate information and early warnings are in place, the focus will fall on ensuring the balanced access of women and men to weather, climate and hydrological information and warnings.

References

ActionAid (2015). Delivering Women Farmers’ Rights. Policy Brief, ActionAid Int., Johannesburg.

Lambrou, Y., & Piana, G. (2006). Gender: The missing component of the response to climate change. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

Denton, F. (2002). Climate change vulnerability, impacts, and adaptation: Why does gender matter? Gender & Development, 10(2), 10-20.

UNDP (2010). Gender, Climate Change and Community-Based Adaptation, UNDP, New York.

Mendelsohn, R., Dinar, A., & Williams, L. (2006). The distributional impact of climate change on rich and poor countries. Environment and Development Economics, 11(02), 159-178.

Thematic Area: 
Gender Impacts

Saving Lives, Protecting Agriculture Based Livelihoods in Malawi (M-Climes)

Climate change severely threatens sustainable development opportunities for Malawi. The country faces a number of climate-induced disasters including floods, droughts, stormy rains and strong winds. The intensity and frequency of climate-related hazards have been increasing in recent decades, due to climate change as well as other factors like population growth, urbanization and environmental degradation. Farmers and rural populations have been amongst the most affected. The impacts of climate hazards have severely disrupted food production, led to the displacement of communities, loss of life and assets, and caused an overall reduction of community resilience.

The “Saving Lives and Protecting Agriculture Based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling Up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems” (M-Climes) project will support the Government of Malawi to take important steps to save lives and enhance livelihoods at risk from climate-related disasters. The project focuses on Malawi’s technical, financial capacity, and access barriers related to weather and climate information (CI). These barriers will be addressed by investing in enhancing the hydro-meteorological capacity for early warnings (EWs) and forecasting; developing and disseminating tailored products for different actors (including smallholder farmers and fishers); and strengthening capacities of communities to respond to climate-related disasters.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.771972633342 -13.982045844645)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
2.1 million direct beneficiaries who will gain access to critical weather information, with 3 million indirect beneficiaries.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$12.3 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$4 million (Government of Malawi US$2.2 million, UNDP US$1.8 million, according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

Climate change severely threats sustainable development opportunities for Malawi. The country faces a number of climate-induced disasters including floods, droughts, stormy rains, and strong winds. The intensity and frequency of climate-related hazards have been increasing in recent decades, due to climate change as well as other factors like population growth, urbanization and environmental degradation. Farmers and rural populations have been amongst the most affected. The impacts of climate hazards have severely disrupted food production, led to the displacement of communities, loss of life and assets, and caused an overall reduction of community resilience.

The “Saving Lives and Protecting Agriculture based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling Up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems” project will support the Government of Malawi to take important steps to save lives and enhance livelihoods at risk from climate-related disasters. The project focuses on Malawi’s technical, financial capacity, and access barriers related to weather and climate information (CI). These barriers will be addressed by investing in enhancing the hydro-meteorological capacity for early warnings (EWs) and forecasting; developing and disseminating tailored products for different actors (including smallholder farmers and fishers); and strengthening capacities of communities to respond to climate-related disasters.

The project is aligned with the Government of Malawi's national strategies such as the Malawi Growth and Development Strategy and the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA). The design of the project followed extensive stakeholder consultations. This process allowed the project to gain the support of the relevant stakeholders including the community members from targeted districts, the civil society and local and international NGOs. The project is also supported by the pertinent government ministries and departments and local government with local offices in the targeted districts (DCCMS, DWR, MoAIWD).

Approximately 1.4M direct and 0.7M indirect beneficiaries (total 12% of the population) will gain access to critical weather information as a result of the project. It will reduce vulnerability of lives and livelihoods, particularly women’s, to impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. In addition, it will increase the resilience and enhance livelihoods of the most vulnerable people communities and regions.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Expansion of networks that generate climate-related data to save lives and safeguard livelihoods from extreme climate events

  • Activity 1.1: Expanding coverage of Meteorological and hydrological infrastructure through installation of AWS, hydrological monitoring stations, lightning detection systems, and lake-based buoys.
  • Activity 1.2: Capacity-building of hydromet staff on operations & maintenance, data analysis, modeling, and forecasting.

Output 2: Development and dissemination of products and platforms for climate-related information/services for vulnerable communities and livelihoods

  • Activity 2.1: Develop tailored weather/climate based agricultural advisories for 14 food insecure districts and disseminate through ICT/mobile, print, and radio channels
  • Activity 2.2: Develop and disseminate tailored warnings and advisories for fishing communities of Mangochi, Salima, Nkhata Bay and Nkhotakhota around Lake Malawi
  • Activity 2.3: Develop and deploy the flood and water resource modelling and decision support system to enhance coverage for disaster risk and water resource management
  • Activity 2.4: Enablea demand-based model for climate information and services stimulating private sector engagement
  • Activity 2.5: Knowledge sharing and management for development, dissemination and use of EW and CI to enhance resilience

Output 3: Strengthening communities capacities for use of EWS/CI in preparedness for response to climate related disasters

  • Activity 3.1: Scale-up community-based EWS in flood-disaster prone areas of Karonga, Salima, Dedza, Nkhotakota, Nkhata Bay, Rumphi, Phalombe and Zomba
  • Activity 3.2: Capacity development of national, district and community level actors on disaster and climate risk management
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project-level monitoring and evaluation will be undertaken in compliance with the UNDP POPP and the UNDP Evaluation Policy. The Project Manager that will be in charge of running the project on behalf of Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA) will be responsible for day-to-day project monitoring. S/he will develop annual work plans to ensure the efficient implementation of the project.

The UNDP Country Office will conduct, within other monitoring activities, annual supervision missions. The UNDP Country Office will be responsible for complying with UNDP project-level M&E requirements. Additional M&E, implementation quality assurance, and troubleshooting support will be provided by the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor as needed.

A Project Implementation Report (PIR) will be prepared for each year of project implementation. The Project Manager, the UNDP Country Office, and the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor will provide objective input to the annual PIR. The Project Manager will ensure that the indicators included in the project results framework are monitored annually well in advance of the PIR submission deadline and will objectively report progress in the Development Objective tab of the PIR. The annual PIR will be shared with the Project Board and other stakeholders.

An independent mid-term review (MTR) process will be undertaken and the findings and responses outlined in the management response will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s duration.

An independent terminal evaluation (TE) will take place no later than three months prior to operational closure of the project. UNDP Country Office will include the planned project terminal evaluation in the UNDP Country Office evaluation plan, and will upload the final terminal evaluation report in English and the management response to the public UNDP Evaluation Resource Centre (ERC) (www.erc.undp.org).The MTR and TE will be carried out by an independent evaluator. The evaluation report prepared by the independent evaluator is then quality assessed and rated by the UNDP Independent Evaluation Office.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Srilata Kammila
Regional Technical Specialist – Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
GCF
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Strengthening climate information in food insecure districts in Malawi

Monday 20 August 2018

Henry Msiska is a 49-year-old Lead Farmer from Mziliwanda village in Nchenachena in the northern district of Rumphi. To Msiska, delayed onset of rains is undoubtedly the biggest challenge in his agri-business. “I remember some years back, the rainy season used to start in November and last in April or May. But nowadays, the rain would start in December and end even before March,” observes Msiska. Due to this unpredictability of the present-day rainfall patterns his crops have been subject to new pests and diseases, a development that has drastically been reducing his farm yields. Despite growing more climate-resilient crops, it has still been very difficult for him to put more focus on them (crops) due to the changes in the climatic conditions. Msiska is not alone in this predicament as this phenomenon affects thousands of other farmers across Malawi. However, with the use of tailored-weather information and advisories, that he and other community members are expected to be receiving through mobile phones, print and radio channels, under the M-CLIMES Project, such challenges are expected to be a thing of the past. The M-CLIMES Project, which is being implemented with funding from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) aims at increasing the farmers’ adaptive capacity and their decision-making through timely provision of climate-related risks information.

UN support enhances delivery of improved weather services in Malawi

Monday 20 August 2018

The Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services has said UN capacity building support to the department has improved their capacity to generate, analyse and disseminate weather information in the country. The department’s deputy director Rodrick Walusa said this on 27th July 2018 when the UN Resident Coordinator, Maria Jose Torres, visited their offices in Blantyre to appreciate impact of UN support to the department. “UNDP has provided us with support to improve our infrastructure for handling weather information,” said Walusa. “We have transformed many of our weather stations into automated ones. With UNDP support, 10 automated weather stations have been fully automated and additional 33 automated weather stations are being procured by UNDP for installation in some of the remaining sites across the country.”

Farmers and fishers benefiting from digitized weather data in Malawi

6 July 2018
The Malawi Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services (DCCMS), with the support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). has embarked on a data digitization process for climate and weather data spanning, that will help improve the accuracy of climate information in the targeted areas.

The exercise which is set to run for 17 days is being conducted in Zomba District under the Green Climate Fund (GCF) funded ‘Saving lives and Protecting Agriculture-based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling up the use of Modernized Climate information and Early Warning Systems (M-CLIMES), being implemented by the Department of Disaster Management Affairs (Dodma).

The DCCMS Chief Meteorologist, Mr. Fred Kossam, said that the digitization of climate data is expected to bring many benefits to Malawi and will provide a fundamental building block for climate change adaptation and disaster management in the country by improving the accuracy of seasonal rainfall forecast.

The positives of preparing for disaster

18 June 2018

Knowledge is power. In terms of climate change, this translates into using a growing understanding of how rising global temperatures lead to localised weather disasters. This improved knowledge can help reduce the physical and social devastation of climate change by providing early warning...

While the landlocked nation of Malawi is highly susceptible to droughts, it also provides an example of how flooding can pose a problem for a number of African countries – even those located far from coastlines. Lake Malawi, one of the largest lakes in the world, is a central geographical and economic feature of the country. A GCF project in Malawi being implemented by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), a GCF Accredited Entity, is installing automatic weather stations and lake-based weather buoys to increase the capacity to identify and forecast flood risks.
 
A major component of this USD 16.3 million early warning project is ensuring that climate information is transmitted to vulnerable farming and fishing communities around the lake. The sharing of climate information to the right people is a key part of all effective early warning systems. In the case of the Malawi project, this will include making sure affected communities know what to do with enhanced weather information. The capacity of local communities, district councils, and national agencies to respond to emergencies will be strengthened through training and improved emergency services.

Malawi's farmers watch climate change

11 June, 2018
News on how farmers in Malawi have been protected from floods by checking how far river waters have risen, indicated by a guage planted in the middle of the river. New finance from Green Climate Fund means these early warning systems can be expanded to 75% of districts, benefitting 2 million people in Malawi. 
 

Malawi: Illiteracy Levels Affecting Meteorological Services

All Africa
28 November 2017

Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services has attributed its information communication dissemination challenge to high illiteracy levels in the country, saying people fail to instantly understand the information they present at once. Amos Ntonya, a Meteorologist in the Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services said this on Tuesday during a meeting organised to sensitise Nkhotakota District Executive Committee on 'Saving Lives and Protecting Agriculture-based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling up the Use of Modernised Climate Information and Early Warning Systems (M-CLIMES)' Project. 

Maravi Post

26 November 2017

The Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DODMA) in conjunction with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) will embark on scaling up the use of modernised climate information and early warning systems (M-CLIMES) Project aimed at reducing vulnerability of communities to climate change. Briefing the District Executive members (DEC) in Mchinji on Friday, Project coordinator of M-CLIMES DODMA, Rabi Narayan Gaudo, said the six year project (2017-2023) will target two million beneficiaries including farmers, fishermen and flood-prone communities. “The Information Systems Programme will help reduce vulnerability to climate change impacts on lives and livelihoods, particularly of women, from extreme weather events and climate change, and strengthen community capacities in preparedness for response to climate related disasters,” he said. Gaudo said through the project, automated weather stations will be installed in 19 districts, automated rain gauges will be installed for enhanced community early warnings, and all 21 districts will benefit from improved accurate and reliable climate weather forecasts for agriculture.

New climate project to support 3 million Malawians
4 October 2017, Lilongwe 

The Government of Malawi, through the Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA) and with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has officially launch a new project to scale up the use of modernized early warning systems and climate information across 21 of the country’s 28 districts. The project called Saving Lives and Protecting Agriculture-based Livelihoods in Malawi: Scaling Up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems (M-CLIMES), is co-financed by the Green Climate Fund (GCF), a global fund created to support efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenge of climate change. The M-CLIMES project will reach an estimated three million people in the country with lifesaving early warnings, and improve the monitoring, packaging and distribution of valuable climate information that can save lives, protect livelihoods, and inform decision-making on development plans.

Scaling Up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Malawi
New UNDP-Supported Project Funded by the GCF Works to Reduce Vulnerability to Climate Change Impacts

By Srilata Kammila

A recently approved project supported by the UNDP and funded through the Green Climate Fund is providing new opportunities to scale up the use of climate information and early warnings in Malawi. The innovative $11 million project focuses on building weather- and climate-related services and has the potential of reaching approximately 2 million people, providing farmers, fishers and communities impacted by a changing climate with the information they need to protect lives and build livelihoods. This includes investing in the use of climate information for planning agricultural and on-farm activities, providing warnings of severe weather for fishers on Lake Malawi, improving flood forecasting and monitoring, and fostering information exchanges through mobile platforms....

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Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
Climate change severely threats sustainable development opportunities for Malawi. The country faces a number of climate-induced disasters including floods, droughts, stormy rains, and strong winds. The intensity and frequency of climate-related hazards have been increasing in recent decades, due to climate change as well as other factors like population growth, urbanization and environmental degradation. Farmers and rural populations have been amongst the most affected. The impacts of climate hazards have severely disrupted food production, led to the displacement of communities, loss of life and assets, and caused an overall reduction of community resilience.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Expansion of networks that generate climate-related data to save lives and safeguard livelihoods from extreme climate events

 

Output 2: Development and dissemination of products and platforms for climate-related information/services for vulnerable communities and livelihoods

 

Output 3: Strengthening communities capacities for use of EWS/CI in preparedness for response to climate related disasters

 

Infographic on the NAP process in Malawi

Infographic outlining the components of the NAP process in Malawi.

Project Brief: Malawi (Oct 2013)

Malawi is particularly vulnerable to climate change and climate variability. Climate change projections show an increase in mean temperature of between 2 °C and 3 °C by 2050, a decrease in total annual rainfall and water availability and an increase in erratic rainfall events. The combination of increased temperature and reduced rainfall is likely to result in considerable loss of agricultural output and a reduction in the extent of land suitable for rain-fed agriculture.

Supporting Malawi to advance their NAP Process

Status of assistance to Malawi for their NAP process:

A NAP Stocktaking Report has been developed by the Government of Malawi,  through the National Climate Change Programmes. The NAP-GSP team has provided feedback on the Stocktaking Report  in cooperation with UNDP Malawi.
> The NAP Stocktaking Report for Malawi is available on request - please email: nap.gsp@undp.org

The Government of Malawi participated a side event at COP 21 on Adaptation Finance: what countries can do to scale up adaptation finance on 3rd December 2015. Tawonga Mbale (Malawi, Acting Director of the Department of Environmental Affairs) discussed the recent approval of a GCF project through UNDP to support an early warning system and enhancing climate data information project. She presented the enabling environment (NCC management policy, communication policy, NAPA, NAPs, REDD+) and summed up the lessons learnt (political support and commitment needed, effective institutions and policy framework, effective coordination mechanism, country ownership and stakeholder involvement, building on past experiences, ensuring sustainability , link to tangible economic development). She also recalled the challenges and gaps (need for co-financing, lack of capacity to develop bankable project proposals, lack of public awareness, weakness in adaptation monitoring).

An inter-sectoral government team led a NAP launch and training for an inter-ministerial group in collaboration with the NAP-GSP team, which took place from 3 to 5 September 2014 at the Livingstonia Beach Hotel, Salima, Malawi. The workshop was led by the Government of Malawi and organised by the national NAP team  with support from the National Climate Change Programme, UNDP Country Office and GWP. Technical support was provided by NAP-GSP, UNDP and GIZ. The Malawi NAP team requested NAP-GSP and partner agencies to provide experts in sectors to participate as resource people in the workshop and to remain engaged in the whole processs.

The Malawi NAP team is in the process of consolidating the NAP road map that has emerged from the work-shop. The main support needs include a stock-taking of existing initiatives, a gap analysis,  a comprehensive vulnerability analysis, climate and socio-economic scenarios, and identifying medium and long term adaptation options in priority sectors. Priority sectors include agriculture, water resources, health, infrastructure and physical planning, transport, human settlements, disaster risk management, forestry, wild life and gender.

> More on Malawi NAP National Training Workshop

Previous NAP-related updates and activities

  • April 2014: A Malawi delegation attended the NAP-GSP Africa Regional Training Workshop (Anglophone) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in April 2014.
  • December 2013: NAP-GSP partner UNITAR met representatives of the Malawi Government, specifically Principal Secretary Ntupanyama, in Geneva and provided her with a brief on the NAP-GSP, highlighting the recent dialogue held with Malawi at COP19 in Warsaw (see below). An Aide Memoire was subsequently shared with Dr Ntupanyama and her team outlining possible next steps for collaboration with the NAP-GSP.
  • November 2013: NAP-GSP invited Dr. Aloysius Kamperewera, Secretary for Environment and Climate Change Management, to speak at a side event in Warsaw (organized by the GEF and GIZ) on progress of Malawi on their NAP process. The NAP-GSP held a meeting with the Government of Malawi during COP19 on 14 November 2013.
  • 2013: The Government of Malawi took early steps to advance their NAP processes in alignment with their National Climate Change Programme (NCCP). The Government is closely coordinating on their NAP related work via the UNDP Country Office.

Malawi's climate change adaptation experiences - overview:

Presented by the Malawi delegation at the NAP-GSP Africa Regional Training Workshop (Anglophone) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in April 2014.

> More on the NAP process in Malawi
> More NAP-GSP countries

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.793945289591 -13.957311499369)
Funding Source: 
Brochures, Posters, Communications Products
Project Details: 

Malawi's climate change adaptation experiences - overview:

Presented by the Malawi delegation at the NAP-GSP Africa Regional Training Workshop (Anglophone) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in April 2014.

 

Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

Malawi NAP Training Workshop

A Malawi National Adaptation Plan (NAP) Training Workshop took place from 3 to 5 September 2014 at the Livingstonia Beach Hotel, Salima, Malawi. The meeting was organized and led by the Government of Malawi, with support from the UNDP Country Office, GWP and technical support from the NAP-GSP team and GIZ..


 

This NAP Training Workshop was an opportunity to plan and develop sectoral activities to support longer term adaptation planning. It also facilitated stakeholder dialogue to determine the appropriate institutional arrangements for the implementation of the NAP process. An important objective was to engage political decision makers and policy makers at the very start of the NAP process in Malawi. Click the links below to access resources, presentations and information about the Malawi NAP Training Workshop

> About - Malawi NAP Training Workshop  on the  NAP process

> Agenda and Presentations

 

Display Photo: 

Malawi – LDCF Project in Machinga and Mangochi Districts, Project Identification Form (16 April 2012)

Project Identification Form (PIF) for the project titled “Climate proofing local development gains in Machinga and Mangochi Districts of Malawi.”

Climate proofing local development gains in Machinga and Mangochi Districts of Malawi

Malawi’s high dependency on rainfed, maize dominated agriculture, combined with poor urban planning in rural towns makes 85% of its populations highly vulnerable to climate change induced droughts, floods and post harvest grain losses. Between 1967 and 2003, 18 floods were recorded killing at least 570 people, rendering 132,000 homeless, and affecting a total of 1.8 million people.

This GEF-LDCF funded, UNDP-supported project will help facilitate the use of an integrated package of ecological, physical and policy measures to reduce climate change related risks and improve the effectiveness of the baseline initiatives in Mangochi and Machinga Districts, in the upper Shire Basin.

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (34.5410156023 -13.8700800794)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and urban communities in the Machinga and Mangochi Districts of Malawi
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$5,850,020 (As of 16 April 2012 detailed in PIF)
Co-Financing Total: 
$36,000,000 (As of 16 April 2012 detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

 

(More Information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

Ecological and physical works demonstrated as climate smart measures for water, soil fertility and post harvest management practices. This component includes the distribution of public and domestic water harvesting and storage facilities (Outcome 1.1); Landscaping and adoption of other measures that complement physical water management infrastructure to reduce risk of climate change induced floods (Outcome 1.2) and; Adoption of climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices (Outcome 1.3)

Upscaling results from the previous component to transform local and national implementation of the baseline programmes, upscaling the resilience of the productivity gains and decentralized development processes. This includes capacity development of district level technical officers to support implementation, maintenance and monitoring of the activities (Outcome 2.1) and; Pilot projects to strengthen policies and policy enforcement for climate consideration in development (Outcome 2.2)

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

 

(More Information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Veronica Muthui
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

 

(More Information to come)

News and Updates: 

Malawi: UNDP Impressed With Project Implementation in Mangochi

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) says it is impressed with how Mangochi District Council is implementing the Climate Proofing Project which aims at protecting the environment. UNDP Portfolio Manager responsible for Resilience and Sustainable Growth in Malawi, Andrew Spezowka made the remarks Monday when officials from UNDP and government visited the district for mid-term project review. Through the project, the council and communities have established irrigation schemes with solar powered pumps, planted trees along the river banks, build dikes to prevent river flooding and promoted natural regeneration in bare areas. The project has also installed a biogas plant at Mangochi prison. The technology which uses human waste to generate bio-energy will see the institution reducing demand for firewood.

All Africa
Thursday 31 August 2017

 

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Malawi – LDCF Project Identification Form

 

Project Identification Form (PIF) for the project titled “Implementing urgent adaptation priorities through strengthened decentralized and national development plans in Malawi.”

Implementing adaptation priorities through national development plans in Malawi

Extreme weather events have adversely impacted Malawi’s food security, water security, energy supply, infrastructure, human health and the sustainable livelihoods of family households. Further, the unsustainable use of natural resource costs Malawi USD191 million or 5.3% of GDP every year with the resulting forest cover in the country decreasing from 41% in 1990 to 35% in 2008.

This GEF-LDCF funded project, Implementing urgent adaptation priorities through strengthened decentralized and national development plans in Malawi, therefore looks at mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into sustainable development policies and planning processes at all levels of government, while establishing an effective system to identify, assess and monitor disaster risks including early warning systems in the country.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (34.8046874844 -14.1259217663)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$4,950,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$15,500,000
Project Details: 

 

(More Information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The project has 3 primary components with associated outcomes –

  1. Integrated adaptation planning at District and Provincial levels including institutional analysis to determine CCA expenditures and CCA expenditure gaps within District level budgets (Outcome 1.1); Professional training on climate change integration in local development planning, policies (Outcome 1.2); Participatory assessments on vulnerability and adaptation to prioritize community CCA measures (Outcome 1.3); Community meetings to develop district-level disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation plans for 4 vulnerable districts (Outcome 1.4); Integration of CCA priorities into the District Development Plans and budgets, and Local Council annual investment plans (Outcome 1.5); Integration of CCA resilience principles, priorities and role definition into development of district policies and regulations (Output 1.6); Integration of CCA resilience principles into results based management training undertaken in UNDP-supported governance programmes (Output 1.7); Addition of CCA vulnerability/CCA resilience indicators to district level databanks (developed in UNDP-supported governance programmes) for planning purposes (Output 1.8) and; Development of an incentive plan to support the effective deployment of roles and responsibilities (Output 1.9)
  2. Implementing urgent adaptation measures through decentralized planning processes including baseline rural development investments adjusted to become resilient to climate change (Output 2.1); Implementation of adaptation measures defined by communities during the development of the District-level adaptation plans to promote drought and flood management and climate resilience (Output 2.2); Provision of technical training and other support as defined by communities to implement the CCA plans sustainably (Output 2.3) and; Provision and use of weather forecast information on short timescales to manage risks to their livelihoods (Output 2.4).
  3. Implementing urgent adaptation measures through support to climate change policy processes and development of regulatory and fiscal frameworks at national level. This will include adjusting of budget preparation guidelines issued by Ministry of Finance to include climate change adaptation (Output 3.1); Training of 100 technical staff and managers in 5 relevant ministries to facilitate the investment plan development process (Output 3.2); Development of economic costing of adaptation priorities, based on public expenditure review and gap analysis (Output 3.3); Setting up of support programme for climate change adaptation costing work (Output 3.4); Integration of adaptation costing into a national, multi-sector adaptation investment plan (Output 3.5); Incorporation of adaptation investment priorities into the spending plans in 3 relevant ministries by 2014 (Output 3.6) and; Creation of regulatory and fiscal incentives to stimulate climate risk reduction by the non-government sector identified for three priority sectors (Output 3.7).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

 

(More Information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jessica Troni
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

 

(More Information to come)

News and Updates: 

Supporting communities in climate change adaptation activities in Malawi

UNDP
Monday 6 August 2018

It cannot be debated that in Malawi, the livelihood of many people is heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture. However, in recent years, the adverse impacts of Climate Change have been making the agriculture sector vulnerable. With the prolonged dry spells, seasonal droughts, changes in rainfall patterns and floods characterising the rainy seasons; these climate Change effects have been posing a serious risk to the productivity and profitability of crop farming in the country. To mitigate these challenges, UNDP in Malawi has been working hand in hand with the Government of Malawi to map pathways aimed at building resilient communities and minimize disruptions from climate disasters that affect everyday life and the local economy. The Government of Malawi - through the Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mining, with support from UNDP and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund - is implementing a project in 3 districts namely; Nkata-bay, Zomba and Ntcheu, to support the implementation of adaptation priorities through strengthened, decentralized and national development. The project aims at establishing and then demonstrate the institutional framework required to mainstream climate resilience and adaptation into development planning at local and national levels.

 

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