Malawi

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events (EAD, 1998, 2002a, 2004). The Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Report of 2001 (EAD, 2002b) has clearly indicated that Malawi is experiencing a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others.

Currently, the majority of rural communities are experiencing chronic food deficits in many parts of the country on a year-round-basis owing to the effects of floods and droughts. This situation has been compounded by the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS that has created a large number of dependant orphans, and has also adversely impacted on rural household food production systems, as well as the quality of life and sustainable livelihoods.

The increasing prevalence of the recurrent floods and droughts is of major concern to the Government of Malawi because of their far-reaching consequences on food, water, health and energy. Erratic rains have resulted in acute crop failure, despite concerted efforts to improve seasonal weather forecasting at the beginning of the rainy season. Crop failure has resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition, especially among vulnerable rural communities. On the other hand, floods have resulted in the disruption of hydroelectric power generation, water pollution, and increased incidences of diseases, such as malaria, cholera and diarrhea. It is against this background that the government has put in place several policies and strategies to address the adverse impacts of climate change on food, water, health and energy, as articulated in Vision 2020, MPRSP, and the Malawi Economic Growth Strategy (MEGS), among many other documents.

Related Content

Malawi's Second National Communication - Official Document - October 2011

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities.

Malawi's Second National Communication - October 2011

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities. The ultimate goal is the integration of climate change considerations into relevant social, economic and environmental policies and actions.

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events and has been experiencing increasing intensity of a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others. The Second National Communication (SNC) has been developed under the scenario of worsening climate change related impacts. The SNC is a comprehensive documentation of measures and strategies, developed through a consultative process, to address threats and challenges posed by negative impacts of climate change and climate variability.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.788466911759 -13.987372270362)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
420,000
Co-Financing Total: 
410,000
Project Details: 

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events (EAD, 1998, 2002a, 2004). The Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Report of 2001 (EAD, 2002b) has clearly indicated that Malawi is experiencing a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others.

Currently, the majority of rural communities are experiencing chronic food deficits in many parts of the country on a year-round-basis owing to the effects of floods and droughts. This situation has been compounded by the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS that has created a large number of dependant orphans, and has also adversely impacted on rural household food production systems, as well as the quality of life and sustainable livelihoods.

The increasing prevalence of the recurrent floods and droughts is of major concern to the Government of Malawi because of their far-reaching consequences on food, water, health and energy. Erratic rains have resulted in acute crop failure, despite concerted efforts to improve seasonal weather forecasting at the beginning of the rainy season. Crop failure has resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition, especially among vulnerable rural communities. On the other hand, floods have resulted in the disruption of hydroelectric power generation, water pollution, and increased incidences of diseases, such as malaria, cholera and diarrhea. It is against this background that the government has put in place several policies and strategies to address the adverse impacts of climate change on food, water, health and energy, as articulated in Vision 2020, MPRSP, and the Malawi Economic Growth Strategy (MEGS), among many other documents.

Key Adaptation Needs

The most vulnerable areas to floods are the lakeshore plains and lower Shire valley whereas droughts affect all parts of Malawi. Severe droughts occurred in 1915, 1948, 1992 and 1995, whereas recent floods occurred in 2000 and 2001. People living near riverbanks are the most vulnerable to floods, which results in untimely deaths, disease outbreaks, and the destruction of crops and property. During drought years, many people, especially children and the elderly, suffer from malnutrition and are easily attacked by various types of diseases. Livestock and wild animals are equally adversely affected by droughts.

In most parts of Malawi, rural communities have tried to devise ingenious ways to cope with and adapt to the adverse impacts of extreme weather events, including shifting homes to higher ground, storing grain in local granaries, hunting small animals, gathering and eating wild fruits and vegetables, sinking boreholes, and using traditional medicines to cure various ailments and diseases. However, some of these are not very effective. A list of actual and proposed adaptive measures in the agriculture, water, forestry, fisheries, and wildlife sectors are given in Malawi’s Initial National Communication to the Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (EAD, 2002a).

Climate sensitive rain-fed agriculture is the backbone of Malawi’s economy. It is a major contributor to the national gross domestic and foreign exchange earnings. It also supports the livelihoods of over 80% of Malawians who are involved in primary and secondary agricultural activities. Furthermore it is the principal producer of raw material for agro-based industries. As such, Malawi as a nation is very vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

The Government of Malawi has included climate change, natural resources and environment within priority of priority of the government business as stipulated by the Malawi Growth and Development Strategy. There is however need to mainstream climate change in its sectoral policies and strategies, as well as strengthening of institutional capacity.

The Second National Communication (SNC) has been developed under the scenario of worsening climate change related impacts. The SNC is a comprehensive documentation of measures and strategies, developed through a consultative process, to address threats and challenges posed by negative impacts of climate change and climate variability.

National Circumstances

Malawi is a land-lock country in Southern Africa part of the Great East African Rift Valley bordering Tanzania to the north, Zambia to the east and Mozambique to south and east. Currently the Government is developing an inland port at Nsanje that would eventually open direct access to the sea through the Shire-Zambezi waterway .

According to the National Statistical Office census of 2008, Malawi’s population is about 13 million and growing at the rate of 2.8% per annum, up from 2% growth rate in 1998 census. This dense and growing population, whose livelihood depend on the availability and health of natural resources (NRs), is putting undue stress on NRs through unsustainable exploitation and utilization practices.

Lake Malawi, which stretches across all the three regions of the country, has a major influence on the climate. Other factors affecting Malawi’s Climate are its latitude and altitude. The mean annual rainfall ranges from 725mm to 2500mm and temperature from 12oC to 32oC. The general trend indicates increase in frequency and intensity of climate related extreme events such as floods, hailstorm and strong winds.

Infrastructure plays a critical role in the achievement of sustainable development through improved transport, energy services, information and communication technology, water and sanitation and provision of improved shelter. In recent years, Malawi has experienced damage of buildings, roads and even hydro-power station from climate-related events. As such, infrastructure designs and codes of practice must take cognizance of the threats and challenges of climate related extreme events.

Malawi’s health indicators in terms of infant and maternal mortality, malaria, diarrhoeal diseases, HIV/AIDS and malnutrition are generally poor even under favourable climate scenario. Therefore, under adverse climate scenario the indicators are likely to worsen unless urgent and drastic measures are undertaken to reverse trend.

Women and girls are providers of a number of household essentials such as collection of water, firewood for energy and food. Women and girls are likely to be burdened further in search of water, food and firewood as these resources become scarce under worsened climate scenario.

Malawi’s economy has been growing steadily in recent years. The main stabilizing factors of the economic performance were tobacco earnings and been food self sufficiency both of which depend on favourable climate in addition to supportive government policies and strategies. In its National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPA), the Government has clearly spelt out the threats the economic sectors face under adverse climate change scenario, and hence the inclusion of climate change in the Malawi Growth and Development Strategy.

Technology is one of the critical factors necessary to enhance the adaptive capacity of a vulnerable country, sector or community. Malawi undertook its climate change technology transfer needs assessment in 2006 to prioritise technologies that would contribute towards its adaptation and mitigation efforts. Some progress has been made through implementation of projects such as Barrier Removal to Renewable Energy in Malawi (BARREM). An action plan is necessary to ensure that efforts to implementation planned programmes are adhered to. 

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Sustainable development and the integration of climate change concerns into medium- and long-term planning
  • Inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases
  • Measures contributing to addressing climate change
  • Research and systematic observation
  • Climate change impacts, adaptation measures and response strategies
  • Education, training and public awareness

The aim of Malawi's Second National Communication is to (i) strengthening the technical and institutional capacities of various public and private sector organizations to acquire skills and competencies in mainstreaming climate change issues into their respective sectoral programmes, policies and strategies, (ii) contributing to global efforts in better understanding the various sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, potential impacts of climate change, and effective response measures to achieve the ultimate goal of UNFCCC of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere to a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. (iii)

proposing climate change projects aimed at finding solutions to climate change problems that communities can adapt and/or use to mitigate climate change, (iv) enhancing general awareness on climate change and climate change related issues, and (v) strengthening dialogue, information exchange, networking and cooperation among various stakeholders in the public and private sector organizations, including NGOs, and the university, involved in climate change studies in accordance with Article 6 of the UNFCCC.

Further, there is need to intensify the implementation of measures, strategies and programmes that reduce GHG emissions, or provide sinks for CO2, in order to avert the negative impacts of climate change (e.g., poverty, hunger, diseases and land degradation) on vulnerable communities and fragile agro-ecosystems. The recommendations made in this document provide insights into the way forward to address the adverse impacts of climate change, including capacity building at individual and institutional levels, in order to achieve the strategic goals and objectives articulated in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the MGDS. 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

In 1992, countries joined an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to cooperatively consider what they could do to limit average global temperature increases and the resulting climate change, and to cope with whatever impacts were, by then, inevitable.

Parties to the Convention must submit national reports on implementation of the Convention to the Conference of the Parties (COP). The required contents of national communications and the timetable for their submission are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. This is in accordance with the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities" enshrined in the Convention.

The core elements of the national communications for both Annex I and non-Annex I Parties are information on emissions and removals of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and details of the activities a Party has undertaken to implement the Convention. National communications usually contain information on national circumstances, vulnerability assessment, financial resources and transfer of technology, and education, training and public awareness.

Since 1994, governments have invested significant time and resources in the preparation, collection and validation of data on GHG emissions, and the COP has made determined efforts to improve the quality and consistency of the data, which are ensured by established guidelines for reporting. Non-Annex I Parties receive financial and technical assistance in preparing their national communications, facilitated by the UNFCCC secretariat.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Yamil Bonduki
Coordinator, National Communications Support Programme (NCSP)
Government of Malawi
Evans Davie Njewa
Project Affiliate
Government of Malawi
Dr. Alex Reuben Saka
Project Affiliate
Government of Malawi
Dr. Yanira Ntupanyama
Project Affiliate
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Malawi National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) Official Document - March 2006

The loss of human, natural, financial, social and physical capital, caused by the adverse impacts of climate change, especially floods, drought and landslides, among many other natural disasters and calamities, is of great concern to the Malawi Government, as it strives to ensure sustainable livelihoods for all its citizens. The threat posed by extreme climatic events to food, health, water and energy has been the driving force for the preparation of Malawi’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA).

Malawi National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA)

National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) provide a process for Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to identify priority activities that respond to their immediate needs to adapt to climate change, ultimately leading to the implementation of projects aimed at reducing the economic and social costs of climate change.

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events (EAD, 1998, 2002a, 2004). The Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Report of 2001 (EAD, 2002b) has clearly indicated that Malawi is experiencing a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (34.022631863594 -11.460542552262)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved capacity building and project identification, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
200,000
Co-Financing Total: 
10,000
Project Details: 

Climate Related Hazards

  • Flooding (flash)
  • Drought and low flows
  • Windstorms
  • Intense rainfall
  • Dry/cold spells
  • Heat waves
  • Thunderstorms
  • Hailstorms
  • Mudslides 

Main Human Vulnerabilities and Livelihood Impacts

  • Reduced agricultural production
  • Water shortage and/or groundwater depletion
  • Increased disease and/or other health problems
  • Food security
  • Water pollution
  • Displacement of people

Currently, the majority of rural communities are experiencing chronic food deficits in many parts of the country on a year-round-basis owing to the effects of floods and droughts. This situation has been compounded by the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS that has created a large number of dependant orphans, and has also adversely impacted on rural household food production systems, as well as the quality of life and sustainable livelihoods.

The increasing prevalence of the recurrent floods and droughts is of major concern to the Government of Malawi because of their far-reaching consequences on food, water, health and energy. Erratic rains have resulted in acute crop failure, despite concerted efforts to improve seasonal weather forecasting at the beginning of the rainy season. Crop failure has resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition, especially among vulnerable rural communities. On the other hand, floods have resulted in the disruption of hydroelectric power generation, water pollution, and increased incidences of diseases, such as malaria, cholera and diarrhea. It is against this background that the government has put in place several policies and strategies to address the adverse impacts of climate change on food, water, health and energy, as articulated in Vision 2020, MPRSP, and the Malawi Economic Growth Strategy (MEGS), among many other documents.

Key Adaptation Needs

The most vulnerable areas to floods are the lakeshore plains and lower Shire valley whereas droughts affect all parts of Malawi. Severe droughts occurred in 1915, 1948, 1992 and 1995, whereas recent floods occurred in 2000 and 2001. People living near riverbanks are the most vulnerable to floods, which results in untimely deaths, disease outbreaks, and the destruction of crops and property. During drought years, many people, especially children and the elderly, suffer from malnutrition and are easily attacked by various types of diseases. Livestock and wild animals are equally adversely affected by droughts.

In most parts of Malawi, rural communities have tried to devise ingenious ways to cope with and adapt to the adverse impacts of extreme weather events, including shifting homes to higher ground, storing grain in local granaries, hunting small animals, gathering and eating wild fruits and vegetables, sinking boreholes, and using traditional medicines to cure various ailments and diseases. However, some of these are not very effective. A list of actual and proposed adaptive measures in the agriculture, water, forestry, fisheries, and wildlife sectors are given in Malawi’s Initial National Communication to the Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (EAD, 2002a).

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Priority Adaptation Projects

  • Develop sustainable rural livelihoods
  • Restore forests in the Shire River basin
  • Improve agricultural production in the face of climate change
  • Improve ability & preparedness to cope with droughts and floods
  • Establish climate monitoring & early warning system on Lake Malawi & lakeshore areas
Contacts: 
UNDP
Jan Rijpma
Country Officer
UNDP
Veronica Muthui
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Ecosystem-Based Approach to Adaptation in Malawi

Malawi’s high dependency on rainfed, maize dominated agriculture, combined with poor urban planning in rural towns makes 85% of its populations highly vulnerable to climate change induced droughts, floods and post harvest grain losses. The government has embarked on two highly ambitious programmes: one on national agricultural input subsidy, to increase the use of inorganic fertilizers and maize production; the second on decentralized governance, making the District Councils and other local institutions the primary focus for delivery of developmental services to the rural populations.The effectiveness of these programmes is however being weakened by inadequate consideration of climate change induced risks to local development, particularly floods, droughts, pests and diseases affecting harvested but badly stored grains

This UNDP-GEF project is using two components to facilitate the use of an integrated package of ecological, physical and policy measures to reduce climate change related risks and improve the effectiveness of the baseline initiatives in Mangochi and Machinga Districts, in the upper Shire Basin. Ecological and physical infrastructure measures for water management will be adopted to regulate baseflow and  reduce risk of climate change driven floods while mitigating against droughts. In addition, climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices will reduce grain loss and increase food security. Replication and sustainability of these initiatives will be secured through mainstreaming climate change considerations and financing into local development programmes and a capacitated extension service

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.7939453125 -12.6696441037)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and urban population of Machinga and Mangochi Districts in Malawi.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$5,318,200
Co-Financing Total: 
$36,000,000
Project Details: 

The project will improve the effectiveness of the baseline programmes by securing the productivity gains in spite of climate change driven risks, primarily in two districts (Mangochi and Machinga), which cover an area of over a million hectares with a total population of about one million people, with a roughly 50:50 distribution on gender lines. The project is expected to work directly in villages with about 25% of the population (up to 250,000 people). Women and youth constitute a large percentage of farmers; broad participation of all relevant groups will be secured through formulation of a gender strategy to guide targeting of project initiatives. Specifically, it will improve household food security, nutrition and incomes by increasing and diversifying farm productivity with low input costs and expansion of irrigation. Adoption of the climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices will increase food security by reducing post harvest losses of grains.

Improved water harvesting will modify water flow during both droughts and heavy rains, further reducing the impacts of droughts and floods on farmers and food security. Together with increased water harvesting by rural dwellings, these measures will increase water availability, reducing the cost (labour, illnesses) incurred through the current difficulties in regulating water for domestic use throughout the year.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1.1: Public and domestic water harvesting, storage and distribution reduces climate change driven flooding and regulates availability of water throughout the year in  flood & drought hotspots

  • Output 1.1.1: Public water harvesting and storage: 3 community based check dams constructed in strategic places to capture and store water, reducing risk of climate change induced floods while regularizing availability of water through wet and dry seasons
  • Output 1.1.2: Water harvesting from dwellings: percentage of farmers harvesting water from rooftops increase by at least 50% and boosts the percentage of farmers accessing clean domestic water in years of drought from a low of 10% to at least 25%
  • Output 1.1.3: Water harvesting and use on farms: percentage of farmers adopting improved water harvesting and retention (such as pools, dams, pits, retaining ridges, etc.) and using it to irrigate crops in the pilot communities increases by at least 25% and increase yields of key crops by more than 30%;

Outcome 1.2: Landscape level ecological measures complementing physical water management infrastructure to reduce risk of climate change induced floods and enhance resilience against unusually harsh and frequent droughts in selected hotspots (covering over 500,000 ha of farmlands and 6 urban centres)

  • Output 1.2.1: Rehabilitation of badly degraded lands in selected hotspots improves land cover, infiltration and base flow;  increasing the ability of the landscape to regulate water flow during droughts and floods, offering ecological protection from climate change induced droughts and floods;
  • Output 1.2.2: Adoption of conservation agriculture practices, integration of agroforestry species, short-cycle, drought-tolerant crop varieties and multiple-use tree species by more than 30% of the farmers increases water retention capacity by the soils, reducing impacts of climate change intensified drought by at least 30%
  • Output 1.2.3: Water use efficiency in small scale irrigation systems improved by over 40% to address climate induced irregularity of rainfall patterns (drought) while improving productivity of the land by more than 10%.
  • Output 1.2.4: Establishment of small-scale flood reduction infrastructure  in selected urban areas (such as water diversion structures, gabions, culverts) integrated with ecological measures (such as protective vegetation, hillside terraces planted with perennial trees and shrubs, stone bunds) improve water drainage and reduce damage from intense climate change induced floods.

Outcome 1.3: Adoption of climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices by > 50% of grain farmers reduce climate induced grain loss by > 30%

  • Output 1.3.1: Skills and institutional arrangements for individual and/or communal climate safe post harvest management practices and storage facilities disseminated, leading to adoption of improved practices by more than 50% and a reduction in post harvest losses of more than 30% of current baseline (baseline to be established at ppg);
  • Output 1.3.2: Financing institutions, local artisans,  marketing channels and the extension service set up to support the demonstration, upscaling and sustainability of the improved climate safe post harvest management practices and technologies

Outcome 2.1: Capacity of District level technical officers to support implementation, maintenance and monitoring of the activities under component 1 and to mainstream climate risks into all local developemnt process (skills, legislation, information)

  • Output 2.1.1: The extension service capacitated with skills (though training) and other support systems to integrate up-to-date information and techniques for mainstreaming climate change risks into the current and future extension support to land users and farmers;
  • Output 2.1.2: Research on local impacts of climate change and adaptation techniques supported to provide a scientific backbone to the mainstreaming of climate change considerations into local development, and linked to extension service for dissemination of more up to date information on weather, risks of drought and flooding to farmers and urban dwellers.
  • Output 2.1.3: A participatory M&E system formulated and implemented to monitor effects of the project on the baseline investments and livelihoods; lessons drawn and disseminated through the regional and national platforms (as well as used to support adaptive management);
  • Output 2.1.4: District councils, local authorities, district planning units and officers of the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning and National Housing Development Authority trained to recognize climate risk problems in new and existing investment projects and apply/recommend/enforce targeted risk reduction and risk management measures;
  • Output 2.1.5: Structural engineers, urban and rural infrastructure planners and teaching staff from technical colleges and vocational training institutes provided with skills on climate-resilient construction, land use and water resources planning

Outcome 2.2:– Local and national development policies influenced by the project supported pilots to strengthen policies and policy enforcement for climate consideration in development

  • Output 2.2.1: Two districts revise local development policy making it mandatory to integrate climate risk considerations  in the design, appraisal and approval process of district development, including the implemenaiton of the agricultural input subsidy programme and civil works (infrastructre and building);
  • Output 2.2.2: Agreement on, and operationalization of district level institutional arrangement for the long-term implementation of the ecological and physical measures and management plans, including enforcement of environmental regulations identified, and operationalized;
  • Output 2.2.3: Two Districts review planning processes to provide greater coherence, coordination and integration between climate change, agricultural-led local development and food security policy processes;
  • Output 2.2.4: A national “Year of Land Care ” launched to promote wide scale awareness of the cost effectiveness of  integrating ecological and physical measures as a means of  mitigating impacts of climate change driven floods and droughts;
  • Output 2.2.5:  Lessons generated at the project/district level fed into the national climate programme, SLM platform and other national planning debates, to lobby and influence the adoption of climate risk considerations as minimum criteria for accessing agricultural input subsidy benefits.

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jan Rijpma
CO Focal Point
UNDP
Veronica Muthui
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Malawi

This project, "Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Malawi to support climate resilient development", responds to priorities and actions identified in the NAPA of Malawi which articulate the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes. The technologies required to achieve these aims will increase the capacity of the national early warning network to forewarn and rapidly respond to extreme climate events.

It is expected that as climate change unfolds the frequency and intensity of climate related shocks will change, therefore improving Early Warning Systems (EWSs) is one way to adapt to a changing climate. As an adaptive measure EWS also benefit the poorer segments of society, those who do not necessarily benefit from large protective infrastructure project. Furthermore, improving the EWS also provides benefits for long term planning and helps NHMS and other institutions build capacity to service other needs e.g. for land-use and agricultural planning, hydro-electric power etc.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects in Africa, visit the UNDP-EWS Africa Blog.

 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.7939453125 -12.9695990267)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$4,000,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$17,136,749
Project Details: 

The project is focused on strengthening the capacity of national and sub-national entities to monitor climate change, generate reliable hydro-meteorological information (including forecasts) and to be able to combine this information with other environmental and socio-economic data to improve evidence-based decision-making for early warning and adaptation responses as well as planning. The proposed project will be implemented at the country level by the lead Ministry mandated to advance climate monitoring including management of climate data in full collaboration with other relevant line Ministries who rely on the information for planning purposes (Disaster Management, Agriculture, Water, Finance and Planning etc). Sub national authorities (Provincial and/or District officers, Municipalities, civil society (women and youth associations, NGOs, media, farmers’ associations) and the private sector will all also be important stakeholders (as end users) and will be provided with the space and opportunity to contribute to the design of the project.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Project Objective: To strengthen the climate monitoring capabilities, early warning systems and available information for responding to climate shocks and planning adaptation to climate change in Malawi.

Outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change.

  • Output 1.1 Procurement and installation or rehabilitation (in case of existing) of approximately 10+ hydrological monitoring stations with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities.
  • Output 1.2 Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of approximately 40 meteorological monitoring stations with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities.
  • Output 1.3 Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of radar for monitoring severe weather.
  • Output 1.4 Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of upper air monitoring stations
  • Output 1.5 Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of satellite monitoring equipment to receive real time climate and environmental information.
  • Output 1.6 Training of at least 3-5 officers to maintain and repair equipment, computer infrastructure and telecommunications , including cost-effective technologies to interface with existing equipment/software (approx. $150,000).

Outcome 2. Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and long-term development plans.

  • Output 2.1 NHMS capacity to make and use climate forecasts (on daily to seasonal, as well as medium- to long-term timescales) is strengthened by training at least 4 forecasters. (approx. $150,000)
  • Output 2.2 Tailored sector-specific early warning products that link climate, environmental and socio-economic information on a range of timescales are developed, based on identified user needs.
  • Output 2.3 National capacity for assimilating forecasts and monitoring into existing development planning, PRSPs and disaster management systems is built, including coordination with systems and warnings developed by other initiatives (approx. $390,000)
  • Output 2.4 Communication channels and procedures for issuing warnings (through both governmental and non-governmental agencies) are enabled (e.g. radio, newspapers, mobile phones, television etc).
  • Output 2.5 Plan for sustainable financing for the operation and maintenance of the installed EWS developed and implemented, including public and private financing options (approx. $150,000)
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The implementation of the project’s activities will reflect UNDP-GEF monitoring and evaluation standards and procedures, in line with the requirements of the LDCF. Details for monitoring and evaluation will be articulated during the project development phase.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mark Tadross
Regional Technical Advisor
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: