Suriname

 

Suriname is located on the north-eastern coast of South America bordering French Guiana in the east, Brazil in the south, Guyana in the west, and the Atlantic Ocean in the north. The northern, lowland coastal area is particularly vulnerable to inundation and erosion of coastal zones and other negative impacts of climate change. Some of the proposed adaptation measures include: integrated coastal zone management, the efficient utilization of water resources, and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

Suriname’s climate is semi-humid, influenced by the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The mean annual air temperature in Suriname is 27 degrees Celsius. Two rainy and two dry seasons occur annually. Suriname receives between 1500mm and 2500mm of rainfall each year. Suriname’s coastal zone is very fertile. 90 per cent of Suriname’s human activities such as agriculture and small industries are located here, along with a large share of the population. Coastal zones also include highly important ecosystems for the breeding and feeding of various species. The tropical rainforest in Suriname is one of the important natural resources, covering approximately 91 per cent or 15 million hectares of the total land area, of which about 2 million hectares or 13% has the status of Protected Areas.

The industrial base of Suriname is dominated by the mining and petroleum industries. To a lesser extent, the agricultural and tourism sectors also contribute to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The vast majority of these industries are concentrated in coastal zones. Large-scale inundation associated with climate change could adversely affect these industries.

Reference: First National Communication 2005

Related Content

Suriname – GEF Trust Project Identification Form (29 August 2012)

Project Identification Form (PIF) for the project titled “Mainstreaming global environment commitments for effective national environmental management in Suriname.”

Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname

Presently there is poor communication amongst ministries and the system for accounting towards meeting the commitments under the conventions is weak. Coupled with low levels of awareness, knowledge and skills among decision-makers, Suriname is struggling to effectively fulfill its obligations towards the 3 Rio Conventions. With the aim of creating a steady platform for effective and efficient political dialogue and cross-institutional alliances, this UNDP-supported, GEF Trust funded project, Mainstreaming Global Environment Commitments for Effective National Environmental Management in Suriname, will work to strengthen the national environmental management at all levels.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-55.7226562693 4.41213681023)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry of Labour, Technological Development and Environment, Government of Suriname
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$1,078,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)
Co-Financing Total: 
$900,000 (As of 29 August 2012, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Generation of access and use of information through  improved decision-support mechanisms and the development of an environmental information and knowlege platform by targetting the ability of institutions and stakeholders to manage information for better environmental planning and processes (Outcome 1.1) and ; increasing the ability of stakeholders to diagnose, understand and transform information into local actions (Outcome 1.2)
  2. Creating and enhancing capacities for management and implementation on convention guidelines including the strengthening of the existing structures and coordination mechanisms to institutionalize coordination across agencies and other relevant  actors  (Outcome 2.1); negotiations of financial commitments to finance the delivery of global environmental outcomes (Outcome 2.2) and; improve the effectiveness of institutions and enhance the functioning of the political, economic, and social system (Outcome 2.3).
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Suriname's Second National Communication - In Progress

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities. The ultimate goal is the integration of climate change considerations into relevant social, economic and environmental policies and actions.

The northern, lowland coastal area is particularly vulnerable to inundation and erosion of coastal zones and other negative impacts of climate change. Some of the proposed adaptation measures include: integrated coastal zone management, the efficient utilization of water resources, and the development of salt-tolerant crops. 90% of Suriname’s human activities such as agriculture and small industries are located here, along with a large share of the population. Coastal zones also include highly important ecosystems for the breeding and feeding of various species.

To view progress on Suriname's SNC click here.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-55.1767401445 5.82167305657)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
420,000
Co-Financing Total: 
410,000
Project Details: 

Suriname is located on the north-eastern coast of South America bordering French Guiana in the east, Brazil in the south, Guyana in the west, and the Atlantic Ocean in the north. The northern, lowland coastal area is particularly vulnerable to inundation and erosion of coastal zones and other negative impacts of climate change. Some of the proposed adaptation measures include: integrated coastal zone management, the efficient utilization of water resources, and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

Suriname’s climate is semi-humid, influenced by the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The mean annual air temperature in Suriname is 27 degrees Celsius. Two rainy and two dry seasons occur annually. Suriname receives between 1500mm and 2500mm of rainfall each year. Suriname’s coastal zone is very fertile. 90 per cent of Suriname’s human activities such as agriculture and small industries are located here, along with a large share of the population. Coastal zones also include highly important ecosystems for the breeding and feeding of various species. The tropical rainforest in Suriname is one of the important natural resources, covering approximately 91 per cent or 15 million hectares of the total land area, of which about 2 million hectares or 13% has the status of Protected Areas.

The industrial base of Suriname is dominated by the mining and petroleum industries. To a lesser extent, the agricultural and tourism sectors also contribute to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The vast majority of these industries are concentrated in coastal zones. Large-scale inundation associated with climate change could adversely affect these industries.

Reference: First National Communication 2005

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Sustainable development and the integration of climate change concerns into medium- and long-term planning
  • Inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases
  • Measures contributing to addressing climate change
  • Research and systematic observation
  • Climate change impacts, adaptation measures and response strategies
  • Education, training and public awareness

Potential Adaptation Measures:

Agriculture and Food Security

  • Enhance irrigation efficiency and/or expand irrigation
  • Agricultural research and transfer of technology
  • Develop new crops

Water Resources

  • Increase water supply, e.g. by using groundwater, building reservoirs, improving or stabilizing watershed management, desalination
  • Decrease water demands, e.g. by increasing efficiency, reducing water losses, water recycling, changing irrigation practices
  • Improve or develop water management

Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems

  • Develop Integrated Coastal Zone Management
  • Protect, including building sea walls, and beach nourishment
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

In 1992, countries joined an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to cooperatively consider what they could do to limit average global temperature increases and the resulting climate change, and to cope with whatever impacts were, by then, inevitable.

Parties to the Convention must submit national reports on implementation of the Convention to the Conference of the Parties (COP). The required contents of national communications and the timetable for their submission are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. This is in accordance with the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities" enshrined in the Convention.

The core elements of the national communications for both Annex I and non-Annex I Parties are information on emissions and removals of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and details of the activities a Party has undertaken to implement the Convention. National communications usually contain information on national circumstances, vulnerability assessment, financial resources and transfer of technology, and education, training and public awareness.

Since 1994, governments have invested significant time and resources in the preparation, collection and validation of data on GHG emissions, and the COP has made determined efforts to improve the quality and consistency of the data, which are ensured by established guidelines for reporting. Non-Annex I Parties receive financial and technical assistance in preparing their national communications, facilitated by the UNFCCC secretariat.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Yamil Bonduki
Coordinator, National Communications Support Programme (NCSP)
UNDP
Nancy del Prado
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: