Niger

 

The climate in Niger is of the Sahelian type characterized by a great inter-annual rainfall, which has been expressed by multi-year droughts since 1968.

Major adaptation activities include, development of the concerted management of water through management committees for national waters basin and through joint-commission and multilateral bodies for trans-border waters and the improvement of knowledge about the great fossil aquifers prior to a balanced exploitation.

Niger is a sahelian landlocked country whose nearest point to the sea is about 600 km. It covers a surface area of 1,267,000 sq km. It is located between the longitude 0°16’ and 16° East and the latitude 11°1’ and 23°17’ North. The three fourths of the country’s land area are occupied by deserts among which the Ténéré, one of the most wonderful deserts in the world.

The country’s economy is mainly based on agriculture and cattle breeding . Furthermore, soils are generally poor and the area potentially suitable for crop production, estimated at 15 millions hectares, represent 12% of the country’s total surface area. These lands, mainly covered by dunes, are not very productive and are sensitive to water and wind erosion.

The potential of irrigable land is estimated at 270,000 hectares of which 140,000 hectares in the river Niger valley. Niger population was estimated at 11,060,291 people in 2001 (General census, 2001). Mainly rural, the populations draw most of their incomes from natural resources exploitation.

The growth rate of the population is one of the highest in the world. It was about 3.3 % in 2001. This population growth combined with difficult climatic conditions (droughts) and inadequate and not very rational use of natural resources led to ecological imbalances expressed by the deterioration of livelihoods.

According to the trends from national statistics, the population will reach 17.3 millions by 2015 and 24.1 millions by 2025.

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Advancing medium and long-term adaptation planning and budgeting in Niger

The “Advancing medium and long-term adaptation planning and budgeting in Niger” project will address the main challenges to integrating climate change adaptation into planning and budgeting in Niger, as identified in its National Adaptation Plan (NAP) Stocktaking Report and under the framework of the LEG Technical Guidelines.

This project will facilitate the implementation of activities to strengthen adaptation-related prioritization and planning, financing and capacity development for the medium term.  Reducing Niger’s vulnerability to climate change requires greater investments and greater integration of climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction into on-going development programmes.

The foundations have been built through the preparation of the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) in 2006 with support from UNDP and the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The NAPA identified urgent and most immediate needs in seven vulnerable sectors and fourteen priority adaptation interventions. The National Climate Change Policy (PNCC) adopted in 2013 provides the overall strategic framework to tackle climate change.  To move beyond urgent and immediate needs, and towards a medium-term approach, Niger intends to integrate climate change into medium- and long-term development planning and budgeting through the NAP process, under its obligation to the UNFCCC and as stated in its PNCC. This process will contribute to ensuring that the country’s long-term development strategy - starting with its Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (SDDCI) and its National Economic and Social Development plans - be based on an understanding of climate-related risks and opportunities for inclusive growth and sustainable development.

Niger has been advancing its NAP process by conducting a preliminary stocktake of relevant initiatives on climate adaptation and mainstreaming to identify gaps and needs. A NAP roadmap was subsequently drafted, which outlined the main steps and timeline of advancing the NAP process in Niger. These were confirmed through consultations with key national stakeholders in August 2016. Furthermore, the Niger submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) in September 2015, signifying a commitment to address both mitigation and adaptation challenges. In terms of adaptation, the INDC has identified the urgent need to support the agriculture, livestock and forestry sectors. This project will complement a project funded by the GEF-LDCF entitled “Planning and financing adaptation in Niger.”

These activities are aligned with the “Nigeriens Nourish the Nigeriens” Initiative (Initiative 3N), the Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (SDDCI), the National Economic and Social Development Plan (PDES), and the National Climate Learning Strategy.

This project will be steered at country level by the Executive Secretariat of the National Council of Environment for Sustainable Development (SE/CNEDD), which is the coordinating body for all Rio Conventions and climate change-related initiatives and the National Designated Authority to the GCF. It will closely engage the Ministry of Planning and the Ministry of Finance, as well as key sectoral ministries, national training and research institutions and civil society, including the private sector. It will closely coordinate with other related initiatives such as the GEF-LDCF adaptation planning in the water sector project, the EU-funded PARC-DAD and the World Bank Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (8.8330077893584 17.35762878292)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$2.9 million
Project Details: 

Niger is a Sahelian landlocked country of approximately 18 million people with a surface of 1,267,000 sq.km. mainly consisting of savannah, dotted with trees in the southern part and bushes in its northern part. The country was ranked 188 out of 188 in the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP)’s Human Development Index in 2015, with 89.8% of the population living in multidimensional poverty.

In Niger, 42.8% of the GDP comes from agriculture, forestry and the livestock sectors, and 80% of the workforce are employed in these areas. Climate change is expected to worsen climate risks over the next decades, with an increase in the frequency of droughts, resulting in a decrease in agricultural production, an increase in grazing pressure on pastoral ecosystems, and consequently soil erosion on a mass scale; and floods resulting from the heavy rainfall and overflow of rivers.

This exposure to climate risks, associated with its position as a Sahelian landlocked country, makes Niger one of the most vulnerable countries in the world and threatens food security even further. In terms of climate projections, the “wet” scenario projects an average increase in precipitation, compared to the reference period 1961-1990, ranging from less than 10% in Niamey to almost 90% in Agadez. The “dry” scenario projects an increase in precipitations ranging from 25% in Agadez to a decrease of around 10% in Niamey or Tillabéry. Compared to the same reference period, the maximum and minimum average temperatures are projected to increase from 0.5⁰ C in Tahoua (dry scenario) to more than 2⁰C to (wet scenario) in Maradi and Agadez in 2050.

The Government of Niger recognises the pressing need of tackling climate change to safeguard food security and to reduce poverty. Therefore, the Government of Niger has set up institutional arrangements to address this need.  The National Technical Commission on Climate Change and Variability (CNCVC) was set up in July 1997. To coordinate climate change and disaster related interventions, the Government of Niger has also established the National Council on Environment for Sustainable Development (CNEDD) and the National Mechanism for Disaster and Food Crises Prevention and Management (DNPGCCA). The Government has also signed and ratified various international conventions and agreements, such as the three Rio Conventions, the Paris Agreement, and the Sendaï Framework for DRR.

As part of the government consultations at national level held in 2014 and 2016 with the support of UNDP, approximately 70 stakeholders were consulted and 25 interviews and meetings were conducted. During the development of this project, a note was formulated by government and validated through a meeting of the national GCF committee, which is comprised of representatives of SE/CNEDD, Ministries of Planning, Agriculture, Economy, Energy, Finance, High Commission on I3N, and the National Meteorological Institute among others. The Ministries of Finance and Planning and the High Commission for the 3N Initiative were also consulted on the priority interventions of the project. Going forward, stakeholders will be consulted and engaged at all stages, from the launch to implementation and review of the NAP. This will be done through sensitisation, consultation, and training workshops. Stakeholders will represent Government institutions, financial and technical partners, international non-governmental organisation, and local civil society. A gender analysis will be conducted to assess the status of gender mainstreaming and to promote gender-responsive adaptation planning.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: National mandate, strategy and steering mechanism are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed

1.1 Re-launch the NAP process

1.2 Conduct stocktake, identity available information on climate change impacts, vulnerability and adaptation, and assess gaps

1.3 Address capacity gaps and weaknesses in undertaking the NAP process

1.4 Comprehensively and iteratively assess development needs and climate vulnerability

Output 2: Preparatory work for the NAP undertaken to develop a knowledge-base and compile a NAP

2.1 Analyse current climate and future climate change, and socio-economic scenarios

2.2 Assess climate vulnerabilities and identify adaptation options at the sector, subnational, national and other appropriate levels

2.3 Review and appraise adaptation options

2.4 Compile and communicate National Adaptation Plan

2.5 Integrate climate change adaptation into national and subnational development and sectoral planning and budgeting

Output 3: NAP implementation facilitated

3.1 Prioritize climate change adaptation in national planning and budgeting

3.2 Develop a national adaptation implementation strategy

3.3 Enhance capacity for planning, budgeting and implementation of adaptation

3.4 Promote coordination and synergy at the regional level and with other multilateral environmental agreements

Output 4: Mechanisms for Reporting, Monitoring and Review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place

4.1 Enhance capacity to monitor the NAP process and adaptation progress

4.2 Review the NAP process to assess progress, effectiveness and gaps.

4.3 Conduct outreach on the NAP process and report on progress and effectiveness

Output 5: Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available

5.1 Assess costs of meeting integrated adaptation needs

5.2 Identify, analyze and recommend policy and strategic options for scaling up financing for adaptation investments, including through public-private partnerships

5.3 Conduct study or research programmes to inform future investments in adaptation across sectors

Contacts: 
UNDP
Julie Teng
Location: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: National mandate, strategy and steering mechanism are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed

Output 2: Preparatory work for the NAP undertaken to develop a knowledge-base and compile a NAP

Output 3: NAP implementation facilitated

Output 4: Mechanisms for Reporting, Monitoring and Review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place

Output 5: Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available

 

Project Dates: 
2018 to 2022

National Adaptation Plan process in focus: Lessons from Niger

This briefing on the process to formulate and implement the National Adaptation Plan in Niger considers firstly the country context and the climate change risks. The groundwork for supporting the NAP is considered, covering the policy, planning and budgetary framework, priority adaptation sectors in NDC, climate assessments, the implementation of adaptation actions and plans thus far. The briefing contains a timeline of the Niger NAP process. Challenges, successes and opportunities are also discussed. This briefing is also available in French.

Evaluation des appuis pour les Activités Génératrices de Revenus (AGR) fournis par le projet – PANA - Résilience

Le projet porte essentiellement sur les principales mesures d’adaptation qui ont été identifiées et retenues au cours du processus d’élaboration du PANA, comme étant prioritaires pour les acteurs aux échelons départemental, communal et villageois ; visant les secteurs d’agriculture et d’élevage, les communautés d’éleveurs et d’agriculteurs. Les groupes des femmes et des enfants sont les plus vulnérables aux effets néfastes des changements climatiques. En effet, les nombreuses années de sécheresse ont contribué à la baisse de la production agropastorale dans certaines zones du pays.

Planning and Financing Adaptation in Niger

The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Niger to develop a project proposal for a new US$9 million grant proposal for the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund. The proposed "Planning and Financing Adaptation in Niger" project will include US$27 million in co-financing. The project looks to integrate climate change adaptation into relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national and local levels, promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transforms access to water to an income-generating opportunity, increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities, and establish an evidence-based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$9 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$27 million (proposed co-financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Integrate climate change adaptation in relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national (2020-2035 SDDCI, CC Strategy, IWRM, multiannual/annual budget frameworks) and local levels

Outcome 2 - Promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transform access to water to an income-generating opportunity and increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities

Outcome 3 - Establish an evidence based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Integrate climate change adaptation in relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national (2020-2035 SDDCI, CC Strategy, IWRM, multiannual/annual budget frameworks) and local levels

Outcome 2 - Promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transform access to water to an income-generating opportunity and increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities

Outcome 3 - Establish an evidence based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation

SUMMARY DOC: Filling Buckets Fueling Change - Ensuring Gender-responsive Climate Change Adaptation

This document provides a summary of a comprehensive study done on gender-responsive approaches to adaptation undertaken through the Canada-UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Facility (CCAF).  The study draws on findings from the six countries engaged in the CCAF, providing insights on the types of resources and partnerships needed at local and national level for designing and implementing effective gender-responsive adaptation.  The countries examined for the study include: Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Haiti, Mali, Niger and Sudan.