Sierra Leone

 

Sierra Leone has a tropical climate with two distinct seasons. The Dry Season (December to April) is dominated by winds from the northeast (i.e. the North-east trades), and the rainy season (May to November). Both seasons may have some variations in the commencement and duration.

Sierra Leone has developed many adaptation projects to address adverse effects of climate change based on existing coping mechanisms and practices such as Develop and enact appropriate policies and regulations relevant to the development of coastal communities, urban growth planning, and critical coastal ecosystems preservation and the Establishment of a National Sea- Level Observing System for Sierra Leone.

Sierra Leone has an area of 72,325 km2 between latitudes 6055’ and 10000’ North and between longitudes 10014’ and 13017’ West. The coastal zone of Sierra Leone extends for a distance of about 465 km. The configuration of the coastline and international boundaries of Sierra Leone encloses a very compact country. Sierra Leone is bordered in the northeast by the Republic of Guinea, in the south and southeast by the Republic of Liberia and in the west by the North Atlantic Ocean.

Climate Change is known to have adversely affected the environment, Agriculture, Food Security, and even the lives and livelihood of large communities. Fishermen are known to have lost their lives in storms and passenger boats have encountered weather-related accidents – even though some go unreported Flooding is known to have affected agriculture and habitats of people in Sierra Leone and their suffering aggravated by the attending health problems of water-borne diseases (typhoid dysentery cholera and diarrhea) due to lack of safe drinking water.

 

Related Content

ProDoc - Building Adaptive Capacity to Catalyze Active Public and Private Sector Participation to Manage the Exposure and Sensitivity of Water Supply Services to Climate Change in Sierra Leone

ProDoc -  Building Adaptive Capacity to Catalyze Active Public and Private Sector Participation to Manage the Exposure and Sensitivity of Water Supply Services to Climate Change in Sierra Leone

23 May 2014

Adapting to Climate Change Induced Coastal Risks Management in Sierra Leone

The coastal zone of Sierra Leone is highly vulnerable to the increased frequency and severity of coastal erosion, flooding and storm surges which severely impact social wellbeing, livelihood security, water resources and major economic sectors such as fishing, tourism and agriculture. Coastal communities are already experiencing considerable repercussions of these impacts, notably on their livelihoods with reduced fishing productivity, ecosystem degradation and low farming outputs. The limited accessibility of climate-related data – in particular marine and sea parameters databases such as wave height, wave period, wind speed and direction – affects the ability of decision-makers to make informed planning and policy decisions for the coast and to take any clear strategic actions to remedy these negative effects. This inadequate lack of knowledge is contributing towards undermining social and economic development, particularly under a changing climate.

The "Adapting to Climate Change Induced Coastal Risks Management in Sierra Leone" project will strengthen the ability of coastal communities to systematically manage climate change risks and impacts on physical infrastructure and economic livelihoods. The project will work along the coastal zone in six pilot sites (Conakry Dee, Lakka, Hamilton, Tombo, Shenge and Turtle Island).

Barriers need to be overcome in order to achieve the project objective. These include: (i) the limited accessibility and use of data and information relevant to understanding coastal related climate risks, (ii) inadequate institutional and policy capacities for Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), (iii) limited awareness programmes on coastal related climate risk and human activities along the coast; (iv) inadequate resources and financial constraints, and (v) the need to introduce climate resilient livelihood options and approaches to address the climate risk facing coastal communities. The project’s approach to be adopted will deliver three complimentary outcomes to address these barriers in a coherent and holistic manner. It shall also contribute to the improvement of Sierra Leone’s ability to systematically manage coastal risks in the face of a changing climate.

Key national partners include the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA SL), the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR), the Institute of Marine Biology and Oceanography (IMBO) and the National Tourist Board (NTB).

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-12.782592799886 8.3405037764018)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
116,000 people
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$9.9 million
Co-Financing Total: 
US$ 31.6 million (anticipated cofinancing)
Project Details: 

Studies and results relating to climate change impacts from Sierra Leone’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA, 2007) revealed that rainfall and temperature patterns experienced in Sierra Leone are changing. Projections of mean annual rainfall averaged from different climate model predictions show a wide range of changes in precipitation, though all indicate a trend towards overall precipitation increase, particularly from July to December. Regional trends, indicated by the IPCC AR4, also anticipate that climate change will result in increased rainfall variability and frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, including Sea Level Rise and higher storm surge risks within West African Coastal regions. Further, results from recent studies carried out as part of the second national communication (GEF-UNDP, 2012) confirm these climate change trends with records of extreme rainfall events, extensive coastal flooding throughout the country, and severe and extensive coastal erosion as result of both heavy rainfall and tidal activity.

The continued vulnerability of coastal communities in Sierra Leone to climate induced risks and related hazards are deemed a key problem. This is further exacerbated by the limited access to accurate and timely climate data and information that can be used to inform decision-making on the coast. In addition to this key problem, weak institutional regulatory capacity coupled with the absence of a national “coastal specific” community-based information system that focuses on supporting the management of climate-related risks continue to hamper long-term coastal planning, management and early warning activities. This thereby affects the ability of coastal communities to effectively and efficiently adapt to the pressures of climate change. The introduction of innovative and resilient livelihood options to address the issue of sand mining along the coast of Sierra Leone shall provide a sustainable and economically viable solution that may be embraced by the GoSL and the construction sector.

Aligning with the SDGs

  • SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere - This project aims to improve flood and marine forecasting within the coastal zone of Sierra Leone, providing useful climate information such as daily and seasonal forecasts, particularly for coastal fishing communities. By 2030 the project will seek to improve the resilience of the poor, reducing their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.
  • SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security – The project will contribute towards ensuring that sustainable food production systems are initiated and that climate resilient agricultural practices are implemented within vulnerable coastal communities so as to increase productivity and production. The project will work with local Women’s Associations and develop resilient coastal small-scale farming including the provision of small scale water sources and irrigation systems to withstand droughts.
  • SDG 5 Achieve gender equality – Women account for over 90% of the people engaged in fish marketing, over 80% of retailers of food products and vegetables, and over 90% of operators involved in the artisanal processing of agricultural and fishery products. The project shall seek to ensure that women will be better empowered by enabling them to have access to financial services through a newly established Community Grant Facility, encouraging them to take action to get involved in local coastal adaptation projects that invest in sustainable livelihood activities.
  • SDG 11: Resilient cities and human settlements - The project will effectively develop national capabilities to better predict future climate scenarios of sea level rise and its related impacts on coastal communities. It will also work to create systematic processes for packaging, translating and disseminating climate information and warnings.
  • SDG 13: Fighting climate change and its impacts - The project will undertake a detailed topographic analyse along the coastline to develop coastal erosion profiles. This will allow for better detailed setback values and the development of a national coastal zone vulnerability and risk mapping programme. The new knowledge base generated on future climate risks will be integrated into national policies, strategies and planning processes. The project will also improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity strengthening on topics such as climate change adaptation, impact reduction and early warning systems.
  • SDG 15: Protect, restore and reverse land degradation – In an attempt to restore degraded mangrove forests, the project will support ecosystem-based interventions (including mangrove afforestation and reforestation programmes) as well as promoting the implementation of sustainable community based alternative income generation activities to help address deforestation.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced availability of high quality climate risk information that is critical for development decision-making in the coastal zone.

Output 1.1:  Climate and oceanographic monitoring network (with 6 automated oceanographic monitoring systems) and related data processing systems installed along the coastal zone to improve the knowledge base for measuring future climate induced risks.

Output 1.2: Institutional capacity of MFMR, EPA-SL, SLMD, ONS, SLMQ and IMBO for assessing coastal hazard risk and vulnerability to climate change through probabilistic modelling is strengthened.

Output 1.3: A systematical link between the collected data and the existing CIDMEWS (web based GIS) is established.

Output 1.4: The human capacity of the MFMR, EPA-SL, MLGRD is strengthened and trained on CVA techniques.

 

Outcome 2 - Appropriate protection measures, policy, budgeting and legal tools and integrated coordination mechanisms developed to improve and support policy design and implementation in dealing with current and long-term coastal challenges.

Output 2.1: Sea Level Rise and coastal erosion profiles developed for the six target pilot sites to support the strengthening of Coastal Zone Management Plans at both urban and district levels.

Output 2.2: Ecosystem-based adaptation design guidance to support future climate resilient planning and development in place.

Output 2.3: Marine spatial plan framework to compliment with ICZM is developed.

Output 2.4:  Sierra Leone ICZM is strengthened with the establishment of SL-ICZM-WG and sustainability mechanisms.

 

Outcome 3 - Public awareness enhanced and climate resilient alternatives to sand mining promoted for better adhesion of policy makers and communities on adaptation.

Output 3.1: An outreach communication, information and awareness strategy designed and implemented to enhance decision-making and foster public awareness and safety about the potential impacts of climate change;

Output 3.2:  Adaptation strategies for alternative livelihoods are designed to strengthen women and sand miner youth association’s resilience to CC impact on the coastal zone so as to reduce pressure on natural resources.

Output 3.3: CSEB practices are introduced to mitigate the risk of unregulated sand mining in Sierra Leone.

Output 3.4: Participatory implementation of urgent and priority medium-scale soft (non-structural) and hard (structural) coastal adaptation works undertaken to protect coastal community at risks.

Output 3.5: Early Warning Systems are extended to target sites in the coastal zone to protect fishing and farming communities.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Clotilde Goeman
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 


Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced availability of high quality climate risk information that is critical for development decision-making in the coastal zone.

Outcome 2 - Appropriate protection measures, policy, budgeting and legal tools and integrated coordination mechanisms developed to improve and support policy design and implementation in dealing with current and long-term coastal challenges.

Outcome 3 - Public awareness enhanced and climate resilient alternatives to sand mining promoted for better adhesion of policy makers and communities on adaptation.

Civil Society Engagement: 

 

     

    Sierra Leone: Fact Sheet (Sep 2013)

    Sierra Leone is particularly vulnerable to the increasing frequency and severity of droughts, floods and severe storms (hail, thunder, lightning and violent winds), and their impacts on sectors such as agriculture, fisheries, water resources, as well as infrastructure and hydro-electric power production. Such climate-related hazards are having increasingly adverse effects on the country and future climate change is likely to further exacerbate the situation. 

    Sierra Leone's Strategy for the Development of a Climate Change Abatement Economy: Introducing and Implementing REDD/REDD+ – July 2010

    In an effort to develop a climate change abatement economy, Sierra Leone’s main focus is to earn forest carbon credits through the implementation of REDD/REDD+ programmes. The government aims to develop and manage 2.5 million hectares of forests in the next decade to assist income-generating activities of non-timber forest products, sustainable tree crops and ecotourism. They plan to achieve this through participatory forest management in all forested districts and communities. 

    Sierra Leone: UNDP Ends Workshop On Climate Change Adaptation

    AllAfrica
    By Patrick J. Kamara, 17 September 2012

    Full Article

    United Nations Development Programme UNDP in partnership with the Global Environment Facility GEF and the Government of Sierra Leone has ended the second phase of the project inception workshop on early warning on climate change adaption in the country.

    Sierra Leone's Second National Communication - In Progress

    The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities. The ultimate goal is the integration of climate change considerations into relevant social, economic and environmental policies and actions.

    Climate Change is known to have adversely affected the environment, agriculture, food security, and even the lives and livelihood of large communities. Fishermen are known to have lost their lives in storms and passenger boats have encountered weather-related accidents, even though some go unreported. Flooding is known to have affected agriculture and habitats of people in Sierra Leone and their suffering has been aggravated by the attending health problems of water-borne diseases (typhoid dysentery cholera and diarrhea) due to lack of safe drinking water.

    To view progress on Sierra Leone's SNC click here.

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-13.2515124618 8.49054923935)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    420,000
    Co-Financing Total: 
    410,000
    Project Details: 

    Sierra Leone has a tropical climate with two distinct seasons. The Dry Season (December to April) is dominated by winds from the northeast (i.e. the North-east trades), and the rainy season (May to November). Both seasons may have some variations in the commencement and duration.

    Sierra Leone has developed many adaptation projects to address adverse effects of climate change based on existing coping mechanisms and practices such as Develop and enact appropriate policies and regulations relevant to the development of coastal communities, urban growth planning, and critical coastal ecosystems preservation and the Establishment of a National Sea- Level Observing System for Sierra Leone.

    Sierra Leone has an area of 72,325 km2 between latitudes 6055’ and 10000’ North and between longitudes 10014’ and 13017’ West. The coastal zone of Sierra Leone extends for a distance of about 465 km. The configuration of the coastline and international boundaries of Sierra Leone encloses a very compact country. Sierra Leone is bordered in the northeast by the Republic of Guinea, in the south and southeast by the Republic of Liberia and in the west by the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Climate Change is known to have adversely affected the environment, agriculture, food security, and even the lives and livelihood of large communities. Fishermen are known to have lost their lives in storms and passenger boats have encountered weather-related accidents, even though some go unreported. Flooding is known to have affected agriculture and habitats of people in Sierra Leone and their suffering has been aggravated by the attending health problems of water-borne diseases (typhoid dysentery cholera and diarrhea) due to lack of safe drinking water.

    Key Vulnerabilities:

    • Agriculture/Food Security
    • Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems
    • Water Resources
    • Public Health
    • Fisheries
    • Land Resources
    • Terrestrial Ecosystems
    • Soils
    • Biodiversity
    • Energy
    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
    • Sustainable development and the integration of climate change concerns into medium- and long-term planning
    • Inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases
    • Measures contributing to addressing climate change
    • Research and systematic observation
    • Climate change impacts, adaptation measures and response strategies
    • Education, training and public awareness

    Potential Adaptation Measures:

    Agriculture and Food Security

    • Educational & outreach activities to change management practices to those suited to climate change
    • Switch to different cultivars
    • Improve and conserve soils
    • Enhance irrigation efficiency and/or expand irrigation
    • Establish seed banks

    Water Resources

    • Develop and introduce flood and drought monitoring and control system
    • Improve or develop water management
    • Alter system operating rules, e.g. pricing policies, legislation

    Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems

    • Develop Integrated Coastal Zone Management
    • Develop planning/new investment requirements
    • Protect, including building sea walls, and beach nourishment
    • Retreat
    • Research/monitor the coastal ecosystem
    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    In 1992, countries joined an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to cooperatively consider what they could do to limit average global temperature increases and the resulting climate change, and to cope with whatever impacts were, by then, inevitable.

    Parties to the Convention must submit national reports on implementation of the Convention to the Conference of the Parties (COP). The required contents of national communications and the timetable for their submission are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. This is in accordance with the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities" enshrined in the Convention.

    The core elements of the national communications for both Annex I and non-Annex I Parties are information on emissions and removals of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and details of the activities a Party has undertaken to implement the Convention. National communications usually contain information on national circumstances, vulnerability assessment, financial resources and transfer of technology, and education, training and public awareness.

    Since 1994, governments have invested significant time and resources in the preparation, collection and validation of data on GHG emissions, and the COP has made determined efforts to improve the quality and consistency of the data, which are ensured by established guidelines for reporting. Non-Annex I Parties receive financial and technical assistance in preparing their national communications, facilitated by the UNFCCC secretariat.

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Yamil Bonduki
    Coordinator, National Communications Support Programme (NCSP)
    UNDP [nid:57]
    Keith Wright
    Country Officer
    Government of Sierra Leone
    Dr Reynold Johnson
    Project Coordinator
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Project Status: 

    Sierra Leone National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) Official Document - December 2007

    The government of Sierra Leone has adopted short-term development plans based on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP), the vision 2025 Sierra Leone document and a series of action plans which are project (short-term) driven. These development (sectoral) plans constitute baseline development strategies which have not taken onboard stresses that can be created by climate change. The NAPA projects seeks to address climate change related stresses or shocks that may disrupt these ongoing development plans.

    Sierra Leone National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA)

    National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) provide a process for Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to identify priority activities that respond to their immediate needs to adapt to climate change, ultimately leading to the implementation of projects aimed at reducing the economic and social costs of climate change.

    Key Vulnerabilities:

    • Agriculture/Food Security
    • Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems
    • Water Resources
    • Public Health
    • Fisheries
    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-13.282449323221 8.4832174179252)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Through improved capacity building and project identification, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    200,000
    Co-Financing Total: 
    20,000
    Project Details: 

    The government of Sierra Leone has adopted short-term development plans based on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP), the vision 2025 Sierra Leone document and a series of action plans which are project (short-term) driven. These development (sectoral) plans constitute baseline development strategies which have not taken onboard stresses that can be created by climate change. The NAPA projects seeks to address climate change related stresses or shocks that will disrupt the process of development. This report also contains priority activities and projects which are to be undertaken to enable Sierra Leone meet its immediate needs and respond to her most urgent concerns with regards to adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change. 

    Sierra Leone has developed many adaptation projects to address adverse effects of climate change based on existing coping mechanisms and practices such as Develop and enact appropriate policies and regulations relevant to the development of coastal communities, urban growth planning, and critical coastal ecosystems preservation and the Establishment of a National Sea-Level Observing System for Sierra Leone.

    Climate Change is known to have adversely affected the environment, agriculture, food security, and the lives and livelihood of large communities. Fishermen are known to have lost their lives in storms and passenger boats have encountered weather-related accidents, even though some go unreported. Flooding is known to have affected agriculture and habitats of people in Sierra Leone and their suffering has been aggravated by the attending health problems of water-borne diseases (typhoid dysentery cholera and diarrhea) due to lack of safe drinking water.

    Key Vulnerabilities:

    • Agriculture/Food Security
    • Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems
    • Water Resources
    • Public Health
    • Fisheries
    • Land Resources
    • Terrestrial Ecosystems
    • Soils
    • Biodiversity
    • Energy

    Climate Related Hazards:

    • Floods
    • Dry spells
    • Thunderstorms
    • Shifting rainfall patterns
    • Landslides 
    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    Potential Adaptation Measures: 

    Agriculture and Food Security

    • Educational & outreach activities to change management practices to those suited to climate change
    • Switch to different cultivars
    • Improve and conserve soils
    • Enhance irrigation efficiency and/or expand irrigation
    • Establish seed banks

    Water Resources

    • Develop and introduce flood and drought monitoring and control system
    • Improve or develop water management
    • Alter system operating rules, e.g. pricing policies, legislation

    Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems

    • Develop Integrated Coastal Zone Management
    • Develop planning/new investment requirements
    • Protect, including building sea walls, and beach nourishment
    • Retreat
    • Research/monitor the coastal ecosystem

    Priority Adaptation Projects

    Agriculture Sector

    • Develop irrigation and land drainage system for agriculture
    • Develop and implement agricultural land-use and land cover management
    • Promote swamp land farming

    Forestry Sector

    • Promote the use of renewable energy (solar energy) and improve energy efficiency and conservation by retrofitting existing and future structures
    • Establish forest reserves, protected Areas and National Park/Sanctuaries and redemarcate existing ones in order to maintain their integrity
    • Management and protection of forests reserves and catchments areas including wetlands and reduce dependence on firewood and charcoal by using liquid fuel (LPG) and bio fuels (ethanol/methane/oils)

    Water/Hydrology Sector

    • Improve water research, monitoring and management
    • Improvement of the efficiency of existing water supply systems in both urban rural areas
    • Promote rain water harvesting and develop an integrated management system for fresh water bodies

    Coastal Zone Development

    • Develop an Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan
    • Rehabilitate degraded coastal habitats
    • Develop and enact appropriate policies and regulations relevant to the development of coastal communities, urban growth planning, and wetland preservation

    Fisheries Sector

    • Promote sustainable fishing practices and develop aquaculture
    • Improve weather forecasting and develop marine meteorological services
    • Preserve and restore essential habitats; promote conservation and environmental education

    Health Sector

    • Increase the use of insecticide treated materials (ITMs) as a key strategy in malaria control
    • Support HIV/AIDs prevention activities
    • Develop appropriate sanitation programs

    Meteorology Sector

    • Establishment on National Early Warning System
    • Improve research and weather forecasting capabilities and rehabilitate national weather stations as well as educate meteorological department personnel to forecast and inform about particular dangerous or extreme events
    • Raise public awareness and mainstream gender perspectives into climate change issues
    • Foster cooperation with International Conventions and Programmes
    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Jessica Troni
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Project Status: 

    Sierra Leone Project Identification Form (May 2012)

    Project Title: Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Western and Central Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change in Sierra Leone

    Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Sierra Leone

    The project, "Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation in Sierra Leone", responds to priorities and actions identified in the NAPA of Sierra Leone which articulate the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes. The technologies required to achieve these aims will increase the capacity of the national early warning network to forewarn and rapidly respond to extreme climate events. 

    The NAPA clearly identifies a priority project on Early Warning Systems (EWS) along with projects associated with Food security, Energy, Water resources and Terrestrial ecosystems. The EWS project is not associated with any one particular sector and is expected to be relevant to multiple sectors, including food/agriculture, water management, health, infrastructure, coastal zones and energy.

    For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects in Africa, visit the UNDP-EWS Africa Blog.

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-13.2739067809 8.47748937686)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Rural farmers and urban residents who will be given advanced warning and access to adaptive technologies in the case of extreme weather events and droughts.
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    4,000,000 (as of May 22, 2012)
    Co-Financing Total: 
    18,389,000 (as of May 22, 2012)
    Project Details: 

    This project is fully in line with LDCF/SCCF focal area objective 2 "Increase adaptive capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change, including variability, at local, national, regional and global level"and objective 3: Promote transfer and adoption of adaptation technology. It is specifically aligned with outcomes linked to these objectives including increased knowledge and understanding of climate variability and change-induced risks at country level and in targeted vulnerable areas, strengthened adaptive capacity to reduce risks to climate-induced economic losses, successful demonstration, deployment, and transfer of relevant adaptation technology in targeted areas and enhanced enabling environment to support adaptation related technology transfer.

    The project outcomes are closely aligned and coordinated with efforts already underway within Sierra Leone to promote development which is resilient to climate change at the national and local levels. The project is focused on strengthening the capacity of national and sub-national entities to monitor climate change, generate reliable hydro-meteorological information (including forecasts) and to be able to combine this information with other environmental and socio-economic data to improve evidence-based decision-making for early warning and adaptation responses as well as planning.

    The proposed project will be implemented at the country level by the lead Ministry mandated to advance climate monitoring including management of climate data in full collaboration with other relevant line Ministries who rely on the information for planning purposes (Disaster Management, Agriculture, Water, Finance and Planning etc). Sub national authorities (Provincial and/or District officers, Municipalities, civil society (women and youth associations, NGOs, media, farmers' associations) and the private sector will all also be important stakeholders (as end users) and will be provided with the space and opportunity to contribute to the design of the project in each country.

    The link between this project strategy and the NAPA is centered on a common goal of informing climate resilient development planning and sector management through improved national systems that generate relevant climate information. Sierra Leone's number 1 priority NAPA intervention is the project, "Develop an Early Warning System in Sierra Leone". This project would "build the capacity of the Sierra Leone Meteorological Department in order to enable it properly monitor weather systems and climate and in particular to be in a position to provide "Early Warning of Imminent Hazardous Weather or Climate." In addition, the country’s number 20 priority intervention is, "Establishment of a National Sea-Level Observing System for Sierra Leone".

    Source: UNDP Sierra Leone Project Identification Form (May 22, 2012)

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
    • Outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change.
      • Output 1.1: Procurement and installation or rehabilitation (in case of existing) of approximately 10+ hydrological monitoring stations with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities.
      • Output 1.2: Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of 20+ meteorological monitoring stations with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities.
      • Output 1.3: Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of radar for monitoring severe weather.
      • Output 1.4: Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of upper air monitoring stations.
      • Output 1.5: Procurement and installation or rehabilitation of satellite monitoring equipment to receive real time climate and environmental information.  
      • Output 1.6: Training of at least 3-5 officers to maintain and repair equipment, computer infrastructure and telecommunications
    • Outcome 2: Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and long-term development plans.
      • Output 2.1: NHMS capacity to make and use climate forecasts (on daily to seasonal, as well as medium- to long-term timescales) is strengthened by training at least 4 forecasters
      • Output 2.2: Tailored sector-specific early warning products that link climate, environmental and socio-economic information on a range of timescales are developed, based on identified user needs.                    
      • Output 2.3: National capacity for assimilating forecasts and monitoring into existing development planning, PRSPs and disaster management systems is built.
      • Output 2.4: Communication channels and procedures for issuing warnings (through both governmental and non-governmental agencies) are enabled (e.g. radio, newspapers, mobile phones, television etc.).
      • Output 2.5: Plan for sustainable financing for the operation and maintenance of the installed EWS developed and implemented.         
    • Outcome 3: All components of implemented EWS are able to function as an integrated system within and between countries
      • Output 3.1: Technical guidance and training delivered to all relevant country agencies on selection and identification of cost effective technologies, including climate monitoring equipment, tailoring of climate information and generation of technically robust warning messages.
      • Output 3.2: Key stakeholders trained on installation of new equipment, warning products and systems in coordination with other ongoing initiatives, including supporting and strengthening EWS related activities (equipment purchases, telecommunications, computer systems, decision support tools) implemented through other initiatives.

    Source: UNDP Sierra Leone Project Identification Form (May 22, 2012)

    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    Project Start:

    • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

    Daily:

    • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

    Quarterly:

    • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

    Annually:

    • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

    Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

    • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

    Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

    • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

    End of Project:  

    • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
    • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

    Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

    • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
    • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
    • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

    Source: UNDP Sierra Leone Project Identification Form (May 22, 2012)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Mark Tadross
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Funding Source Short Code: 
    ldcf
    Project Status: