Togo

 

Togo is located in West Africa on the Guinea Coast. At latitudes of 6‐12°N, the climate of Togo is tropical, and strongly influenced by the West African Monsoon.

The rainfall seasons of Togo are controlled by the movement of the tropical rain belt, which oscillates between the northern and southern tropics over the course of a year. In northern Togo, there is a single wet season occurring between May and November, when the ITCZ is in its northern position and the prevailing wind is south‐westerly, and a dry season between December and March when the ‘Harmattan’ wind blows north‐easterly.

The seasonal rainfall in this region varies considerably on inter‐annual and inter‐decadal timescales, due in part to variations in the movements and intensity of the ITCZ, and variations in timing and intensity of the West African Monsoon.

The most well documented cause of these variations is the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). El Niño events are associated with drier conditions in West Africa. Seasonal variations in temperature in Togo are greatest in the north, with highest temperatures in the hot, dry season at 27‐32°C, and lowest at 25‐27°C. Further south, temperatures reach up to 27‐32°C in the warmest season, and 22‐25°C at their lowest.

Source: University of Oxford, School of Geography and the Environment. Accessed on 23 November 2009 at: http://country-profiles.geog.ox.ac.uk/.

Related Content

Togo – GEF Trust Project Identification Form (31 January 2012)

Project Identification Form (PIF) for the project titled “Strengthening National and Decentralized Management for Global Environmental Benefits in Togo.”

Strengthening National and Decentralized Management for Global Environmental Benefits in Togo

The project titled “Strengthening National and Decentralized Management for Global Environmental Benefits in Togo” aims to strengthen capacities at the systemic, organizational, and individual levels of the government. These in turn will reinforce Togo's efforts to mainstream environmental priorities into sectoral policies and apply sound environmental management practices.  The expected outcome of the project is that Togo will be able to catalyze effective and efficient implementation of international environmental conventions.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (1.14257811795 7.54765560789)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Ministry for the Environment and Forest Resources (MERF), Government of Togo
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$847,000 (As of 31 January 2012, detailed in PIF)
Co-Financing Total: 
$1,165,000 (As of 31 January 2012, detailed in PIF)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has two main components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Strengthen the national institutional framework for environmental management through creation of tools for the National Commission for Sustainable Development (CNDD) to effectively coordinate the implementation of global environment convention articles (Outcome 1.1); collection of data, knowledge, tools and human resources for the National Agency for Environmental Management (ANGE) to effectively implement the global environment Convention articles lying within its mandate (Outcome 1.2); capacity building of the National Environmental Fund (FNE) to mobilize and allocate resources (Outcome 1.3) and; capacity building of the National Committees for the global conventions to effectively oversee the achievement of the Convention’s obligations, and to ensure coordination and synergies (Outcome 1.4).
  2. Decentralization of planning and management to implement the global environment conventions including formulation of a modified decentralization methodology, revised databases, guidelines, monitoring system and local plans among others. This will first be piloted and then replicated across the country to support adaptation and conservation activities.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Togo's Second National Communication - Official Document (French) - November 2010

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities.

Togo's Second National Communication - November 2010

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities. The ultimate goal is the integration of climate change considerations into relevant social, economic and environmental policies and actions.

Key Vulnerabilities:

  • Agriculture/Food Security
  • Coastal Zones and Marine Ecosystems
  • Water Resources
  • Public Health
  • Fisheries
  • Terrestrial Ecosystems
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (1.22215199098 6.12712968005)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
420,000
Co-Financing Total: 
410,000
Project Details: 

Togo is located in West Africa on the Guinea Coast. At latitudes of 6‐12°N, the climate of Togo is tropical, and strongly influenced by the West African Monsoon.

The rainfall seasons of Togo are controlled by the movement of the tropical rain belt, which oscillates between the northern and southern tropics over the course of a year. In northern Togo, there is a single wet season occurring between May and November, when the ITCZ is in its northern position and the prevailing wind is south‐westerly, and a dry season between December and March when the ‘Harmattan’ wind blows north‐easterly.

The seasonal rainfall in this region varies considerably on inter‐annual and inter‐decadal timescales, due in part to variations in the movements and intensity of the ITCZ, and variations in timing and intensity of the West African Monsoon.

The most well documented cause of these variations is the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). El Niño events are associated with drier conditions in West Africa. Seasonal variations in temperature in Togo are greatest in the north, with highest temperatures in the hot, dry season at 27‐32°C, and lowest at 25‐27°C. Further south, temperatures reach up to 27‐32°C in the warmest season, and 22‐25°C at their lowest.

Source: University of Oxford, School of Geography and the Environment. Accessed on 23 November 2009 at: http://country-profiles.geog.ox.ac.uk/.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Sustainable development and the integration of climate change concerns into medium- and long-term planning
  • Inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases
  • Measures contributing to addressing climate change
  • Research and systematic observation
  • Climate change impacts, adaptation measures and response strategies
  • Education, training and public awareness
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

In 1992, countries joined an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to cooperatively consider what they could do to limit average global temperature increases and the resulting climate change, and to cope with whatever impacts were, by then, inevitable.

Parties to the Convention must submit national reports on implementation of the Convention to the Conference of the Parties (COP). The required contents of national communications and the timetable for their submission are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. This is in accordance with the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities" enshrined in the Convention.

The core elements of the national communications for both Annex I and non-Annex I Parties are information on emissions and removals of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and details of the activities a Party has undertaken to implement the Convention. National communications usually contain information on national circumstances, vulnerability assessment, financial resources and transfer of technology, and education, training and public awareness.

Since 1994, governments have invested significant time and resources in the preparation, collection and validation of data on GHG emissions, and the COP has made determined efforts to improve the quality and consistency of the data, which are ensured by established guidelines for reporting. Non-Annex I Parties receive financial and technical assistance in preparing their national communications, facilitated by the UNFCCC secretariat.

Contacts: 
UNDP [nid:57]
Yamil Bonduki
Coordinator, National Communications Support Programme (NCSP)
UNDP
Yawo Jonky Tenou
Project Affiliate
Government of Togo
Koffi Hounkpe
Project Affiliate
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

Togo National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) Official Document - September 2009 (French)

According to the Togo's National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA), the country’s economy depends on the agriculture (mainly coffee, cocoa, and cotton). Agriculture activity represents about 40% of GDP (comprises 50% of the country’s export earnings) and employs 70% of the population. Togo's climate varies from tropical to savanna. The main climate risks facing Togo are violent winds, coastal erosion, poor distribution of rain, and late rains, with flooding and drought remaining the greatest threats.

 

Togo National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA)

According to the Togo's National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA), the country’s economy depends on the agriculture (mainly coffee, cocoa, and cotton). Agriculture activity represents about 40% of GDP (comprises 50% of the country’s export earnings) and employs 70% of the population. Togo's climate varies from tropical to savanna. The main climate risks facing Togo are violent winds, coastal erosion, poor distribution of rain, and late rains, with flooding and drought remaining the greatest threats.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (1.2250030743852 6.1241422582786)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved capacity building and project identification, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
200,000
Co-Financing Total: 
20,000
Project Details: 

Togo is located in West Africa on the Atlantic coast of the Gulf of Guinea. The country spans an area of 54,400 km2 encompassing rolling hills (the Chaîne du Togo) in the north, a southern plateau (Ouatchi Plateau or Terre de Barre), and a low coastal plain with extensive lagoons and marshes. A number of lakes dot the Togolese landscape, the largest being Lake Togo, in the south.1 In 2006, the country had an estimated population of of 6.6 million with an average annual growth rate of 2.5%.2 Considered to be one of the poorest countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Togo’s average per capita GNP is estimated at US $440.34 This is particularly low compared to the Sub-Saharan Africa average (US $842) and to the Low-Income Countries average (US $650).

In Togo, over 61% of the population lives below the poverty line, a situation more acute in rural areas. Rural poverty is a significant problem in the country; the Savannah region is the poorest with roughly 90% living in poverty, followed by the Central region (78%), Kara (75%), Coastal (69%), Plateau (56%), and Lomé (24%). Undernourishment afflicts 64.2% of the population, and the poor lack reliable access to education, health, electricity, and drinking water. The country’s poverty is in part due to the political turmoil it experienced between 1991-2006 when per capita incomes fell by 20%. In addition to widespread poverty, environmental problems and population growth continue to hinder advancements in development. Togo’s natural resources are being depleted rapidly with devastating consequences for the ecosystem. In particular, clean water is becoming increasingly scarce.

According to the Togo's National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA), the country’s economy depends on the agriculture (mainly coffee, cocoa, and cotton). Agriculture activity represents about 40% of GDP (comprises 50% of the country’s export earnings) and employs 70% of the population. The livestock sector remains undeveloped. Phosphate exporting is an important source of revenue for the country. Togo's climate varies from tropical to savanna. The main climate risks facing Togo are violent winds, coastal erosion, poor distribution of rain, and late rains, with flooding and drought remaining the greatest threats.

Source: World Bank Climate Risk and Adaptation Profile (April, 2011)

Priority Sectors

  • Agriculture
  • Water Resources
  • Coastal Zone Management
  • Health
  • Energy
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Togo's National Adaptation Programme of Action describes the following most urgent adaptation needs:

  • Adaptation of agricultural production systems in three regions through the introduction of cultural techniques including the improvement of agro-meteorological information;
  • Establishment of an early warning system to provide real-time information regarding flooding in the Maritime and Kara regions;
  • Strengthen coastal protection against coastal erosion in the eastern port of Lomé;
  • Support for rural communities in the Savannah and Kara regions to prevent and combat vector- borne diseases;
  • Develop small-scale irrigation in lowland areas for groups of farmers living in the Central, Kara, and Savannah regions in an effort to curtail migration;
  • Initiate income-generating schemes for communities of farmers and fishermen in coastal areas with the objective of building capacity to manage the adverse effects of climate change;
  • Support the capture of surface water in the Savannah and Kara by multi-purpose hillside water catchments;
  • Source: Togo’s National Adaptation Programme of Action.
  • Sustainable management of wood and charcoal energy, bush fire, reforestation, and participative management of existent forest;
  • Develop and reinforce the electricity network for its transportation and distribution.
Contacts: 
UNDP
Jessica Troni
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: