SCCF

SCCF

The Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) was established to support adaptation and technology transfer in all developing country parties to the UNFCCC. The SCCF supports both long-term and short-term adaptation activities in water resources management, land management, agriculture, health,  infrastructure development, fragile ecosystems, including mountainous ecosystems, and integrated coastal zone management.

 

 

Here are a few examples of the UNDP-GEF supported LDCF projects currently under implementation around the world:

caption

The Adapting to Climate Change through Effective Water Governance in Ecuador project is increasing adaptive capacities of water resource management in the agriculture and the energy sector through sound water governance arrangements, information management and flexible financial mechanisms to promote local innovation towards sustainable water management.

 

Photo: UNDP Ecuador

 

The SCCF project in the Philippines will Scale up Risk Transfer Mechanisms for Climate Vulnerable Farming Communities. This project aims to reduce poverty through strengthening the resilience of vulnerable farming communities to climate risks in the North of Mindanao, including measures to promote greater productivity, sustainability and increased certainty. The project will deliver this objective through reducing vulnerability in development sectors and strengthening awareness and ownership of adaptation and climate risk reduction processes at local levels.

 

Photo: ILO-DOLE-DTI, CCA Project, UNDP Philippines

The Mozambique Coping with Drought and Climate Change project will reduce drought vulnerability in farming and pastoral communities by guaranteeing water supply and through training the local communities to grow drought-resistant crops, like sweet potato, cassava or sorghum.

 

Photo: UNDP Mozambique

Taxonomy Term List

Technology Transfer for Climate Resilient Flood Management in Bosnia and Herzegovina's Vrbas River Basin​

BiH is significantly exposed to the threats of climate change, but has very limited capacity to address and adapt to its negative impacts, in particular the frequency and magnitude of floods from its major rivers which have tripled in frequency in the last decade. The negative impacts of climate change particularly affect the vulnerable groups within the basin and key sectors such as agriculture and energy (hydropower). Vrbas River basin is characterized by a large rural population comprised of the poorest and most vulnerable communities in BiH, including war returnees and displaced people, with high exposure to flooding and its devastating impacts. In May 2014, Bosnia and Herzegovina experienced its worst flooding in 150 years which resulted in 23 deaths and 2.7 Billion USD worth of damages which is 15% of GDP, and is expected to result in a 1.1% contraction in the economy this year, compared to the growth of 2.2% that had been predicted before the flood.

The project, “Technology transfer for climate resilient flood management in Vrbas River Basin”, will enable the government of BiH and communities of the Vrbas basin to adapt to flood risk through the transfer of adaptation technologies for climate resilient flood management and embark on climate resilient economic activities.

Working closely with state, entity and local governments and institutions the project will enable strategic management of flood risk through the legislative and policy framework and appropriate sectoral policies and plans that incorporate climate change considerations. In order to develop institutional and local capacities in Flood Risk Management (FRM) the project aims to:

  • Upgrade and rehabilitate of the hydrometric monitoring network,
  • Develop Flood Risk Management plan (FRM) for Vrbas river basin (VRB),
  • Develop flood risks and flood hazard maps for the VRB,
  • Develop a flood forecasting system and early warning system,
  • Develop emergency response plans, and provide trainings in flood-specific civil protection,
  • Provide targeted training on climate-induced FRM to over 100 practitioners and decisions makers,
  • Prepare institutional capacity development plan for the long-term development of capability and capacity in Flood Risk Management (FRM),
  • Implement non-structural interventions in municipalities of the VRB,
  • Provide training to local communities in climate resilient FRM, and introduce community-based early warning systems,
  • Prepare and implement municipal-level flood response and preparedness plans,
  • Implement agro-forestation scheme,
  • Introduce financial instruments such as index-based flood insurance and credit deference schemes as a means of compensating for flood damages for agriculture. 

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014) and Establishment of hydro-meteorological network in Vrbas River Basin (November 2015).

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (17.413330041505 44.592423131342)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the Vrbas River Basin
Funding Source: 

Together in the struggle with the climate change - UNDP BiH

The workshop on reducing the risk of floods and the impact of climate change was held in Banja Luka, April 2015, and it aimed to gather all relevant representatives of local authorities and institutions and international organizations in order to get familiar with all the activities that take place and effectively coordinate them. The ongoing projects and planned activities were presented in the field of flood protection and water management in BiH and all participants expressed their willingness to reduce the risk of flooding and other negative impacts of climate change.

Financing Amount: 
5,000,000 (Grant Amount detailed in the CEO Endorsement, 21 January 2015.)
Co-Financing Total: 
77,260,000 (As detailed in the CEO Endorsement, 21 January 2015.)
About: 

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) is a middle income country with an estimated 3.8 million inhabitants, which is still recovering from the 1992-1995 war which had a devastating impact on its human, social and economic resources, leading to enormous challenges of the post-war reconstruction and economic and social recovery. This challenge has been further compounded by the transition towards market economy requiring structural reforms and improved governance. The slow rate of the post-war economic recovery of Bosnia and Herzegovina has been compounded by the negative impacts of climate change on key sectors such as agriculture, energy (hydropower), the environment and, in particular, the frequency and magnitude of flood disasters, which have tripled in frequency in the last decade.  In May 2014, Bosnia and Herzegovina experienced its worst flooding in 150 years which resulted in 23 deaths and $2.7 Billion USD worth of damages which is 15% of GDP, and is expected to result in a 1.1 percent contraction in the economy this year, compared to the growth of 2.2 percent that had been predicted before the flood.

BiH is significantly exposed to the threats of climate change, but has very limited capacity to address and adapt to its negative impacts, in particular the frequency and magnitude of floods from its major rivers. The Vrbas River basin is characterized by a large rural population comprised of the poorest and most vulnerable communities in BiH, including war returnees and displaced people, with high exposure to flooding and its devastating impacts. Of the 28 munipalities that make up the Vrbas basin, 13 have experienced flooding in the past decade. Around a third of the rural population of Vrbas Basin (approximately 100,300 people) manage "smallholdings" where they produce fruit, vegetables and livestock products mainly for their own consumption, and about 16% may be classified as "farmers", in that they manage at least 3 ha and/or 3 livestock units. Agriculture is therefore important to the Vrbas River Basin, and the direct impacts of climate change on agriculture such as floods and droughts will inevitably impact the rural communities without any adaptation. Under climate change there is a real risk of reduced crop yields leading to increased food prices, which would in turn have negative implications for food security. 

The SCCF funds will be used to enable the communities of the Vrbas basin to adapt to flood risk through the transfer of adaptation technologies for climate resilient flood management, upgrade and rehabilitation of the hydrometric monitoring network, development of a flood forecasting system and early warning system, development of emergency response plans, and provision of training in flood-specific civil protection.   Importantly, the project will provide targeted training on climate-induced FRM to over 100 practitioners and decisions makers, and will develop an institutional capacity development plan for the long-term development of capability and capacity in Flood Risk Management (FRM).  The project will work closely with affected communities to introduce climate resilient community-based non-structural measures and provide training to local communities in climate resilient FRM. This will include the introduction of agro-forestry, community-based early warning systems, reforestation and introduction of financial instruments such as index-based flood insurance and credit deference schemes as a means of compensating for flood damages for agriculture. 

The enabling environment will be enhanced by embedding climate change into key sector policies, strategies and plans to enable climate resilient flood risk management within sectors that impact flood risk significantly, including land use and spatial planning, forestry, agriculture and energy sectors.  Specifically, the project will introduce floodplain management regulations that will enhance zoning of development and activities away from high risk areas. 

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1. Key relevant development strategies/policies/legislation integrate climate change-resilient flood management approaches

Update at least two priority sectoral policies and plans (e.g. agriculture, hydropower, water resources) to include climate change modeling results (Output 1.1); Update floodplain management and spatial planning regulations and policies to include climate change risks (revision of land use regulations, stricter policy on construction permits in the areas prone to flooding, etc) (Output 1.2); also to codify and disseminate appropriate adaptation technology solutions for climate resilient flood management in BiH (Output 1.3).

Outcome 2. Climate resilient flood risk management is enabled by transferring modern technologies and strengthening institutional capacities

Improved hydrological and hydrodynamic model for the VRB incorporating climate change predictions, developed to produce flood hazard inundation maps for spatial planning and emergency response planning, and for the long-term strategic flood risk management of the VRB (Output 2.1)establishe and institutionalize GIS-based vulnerability, loss and damages assessment tool and database to record, analyze, predict and assess hydro-meteorological and other hazard events and associated losses (Output 2.2)upgrade the hydro-meteorological monitoring system in the VRB (increased from 11 to 25 gauging stations) and harmonize into a central hydrometric system (Output 2.3); Develop institutional capacity strengthening plan and provide targeted training on climate-induced flood risk management to at least 100 practitioners and decision-makers (Output 2.4)

Outcome 3. New technologies and approaches for enhanced flood risk management applied to increase resilience of vulnerable communities in VRB.

Developed integrated land use and flood risk management plan for the VRB and implement non-structural measures by local communities (through Output 3.2.), government and/or private sector (Output 3.1)Implement articipatory community-based adaptation strategies, technologies and practices in priority flood risk areas (e.g. community afforestation scheme on the flood plains as well as establish locally controlled and managed flood zones and watershed rehabilitation works, etc. (Output 3.2); Train local communities (particularly women and refugees) to implement and maintain flood resilient non-structural intervention measures, including agricultural practices such as agro-forestry, to improve livelihoods of 13communities in the VRB, and community-based flood early warning systems (Output 3.3)Modify early warning system in VRB to include the new hydrometric monitoring network as part of a fully-integrated flood forecasting system (comprised of centrally-based and community-based early warning systems) while also preparing and implementing municipal-level flood response and preparedness plans (Output 3.4)

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The project will be monitored through the following M& E activities, which include Inception Workshop and Report; Measurement of Means of Verification of project results; Measurement of Means of Verification for Project Progress on output and implementation; ARR/PIR; Periodic status/ progress reports; Mid-term Evaluation; Final Evaluation; Project Terminal Report; Audit; and Visits to field sites.

A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

The Inception Workshop should address a number of key issues including:

a)     Assist all partners to fully understand and take ownership of the project.  Detail the roles, support services and complementary responsibilities of UNDP CO and RCU staff vis à vis the project team.  Discuss the roles, functions, and responsibilities within the project's decision-making structures, including reporting and communication lines, and conflict resolution mechanisms.  The Terms of Reference for project staff will be discussed again as needed.

b)     Based on the project results framework and the relevant SOF (e.g. GEF) Tracking Tool if appropriate, finalize the first annual work plan.  Review and agree on the indicators, targets and their means of verification, and recheck assumptions and risks. 

c)     Provide a detailed overview of reporting, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) requirements.  The Monitoring and Evaluation work plan and budget should be agreed and scheduled.

d)     Discuss financial reporting procedures and obligations, and arrangements for annual audit.

e)     Plan and schedule Project Board meetings.  Roles and responsibilities of all project organisation structures should be clarified and meetings planned.  The first Project Board meeting should be held within the first 12 months following the inception workshop.

Periodic Monitoring through site visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-term of project cycle:

The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation at the mid-point of project implementation (insert date).  The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  The organization, terms of reference and timing of the mid-term evaluation will be decided after consultation between the parties to the project document.  The Terms of Reference for this Mid-term evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.  The management response and the evaluation will be uploaded to UNDP corporate systems, in particular the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC)

The relevant SOF (GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the mid-term evaluation cycle. 

End of Project:

An independent Final Terminal Evaluation will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals. The Terms of Reference for this evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.

The Final Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities and requires a management response which should be uploaded to PIMS and to the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC)

The relevant SOF (e.g GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the final evaluation.

During the last three months, the project team will prepare the Project Terminal Report. This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Contacts: 
UNDP
Nataly Olofinskaya
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SCCF
Map Caption: 

Vrbas River Basin

Display Photo: 

Addressing Climate Change Vulnerabilities and Risks in Vulnerable Coastal Areas of Tunisia

The coastal region constitutes the backbone of Tunisia's economy with important agricultural activity, industry and ports offering access to external markets. It is also considered an important water reserve for the whole country, with coastal aquifers accounting for over 50% of Tunisia’s shallow groundwater resources. As a result, the government of Tunisia has identified sea level rise and coastal development as a top priority for adaptation action. The SCCF funded project aims to promote innovative adaptation strategies, technologies and financing options in Tunisia’s most vulnerable coastal areas.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (9.40429686025 33.3764123621)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The coastal community of Tunisia
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$6,050,000 (As of 20 September 2012, detailed in PIF)
Co-Financing Total: 
$55,165,000 (As of 20 September 2012, detailed in PIF)
About: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project has three components with the following associated outcomes –

  1. Enabling policy and institutional frameworks through regulations and enforcement mechanisms governing coastal land use to include climate risks management requirements (Outcome 1.1); the introduction of advanced methods and tools for coastal risk assessment and adaptation planning (Outcome 1.2); delivery of hardware and software observation capacities, data collection and treatment (Outcome 1.3) and; the revision of zoning regulations and disaster management strategies on impact scenarios, shoreline management planning and cost-benefit analysis of adaptation options (Outcome 1.4).
  2. Replicable adaptation measures are developed in the target coastal sites including shore protection practices and technologies to mitigate long-term risks (Outcome 2.1); controlled extraction and improved management systems for coastal fresh aquifer (Outcome 2.2); Strengthening of technical capacities, institutional functions and associated budgets for the maintenance, planning and expansion of  the introduced shore protection and coastal adaptation practicies (Outcome 2.3) and; Development of a coastal risk monitoring and early warning system (Outcome 2.4).
  3. Economic incentives for coastal adaptation are created including a comprehensive coastal adaptation investment plan for the tourism sector (Outcome 3.1); introduction of regulations and disbursement procedures for the National Fund for the Protection of Tourism Zones (Outcome 3.2) and; introduction of property insurance and fiscal mechanisms that provide effective risk sharing and risk reduction incentives for highly exposed businesses and households (Outcome 3.3).

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

(More information to come)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Strategic Planning and Action to strengthen climate Resilience of Communities in Nusa Tenggara Timor province (SPARC)

The project will apply a holistic approach to improve rural livelihoods and food security by strengthening climate resilience. It will work simultaneously at the policy and grassroots levels. It will create continuous dialogue between these levels and stakeholders involved to ensure that policies to be developed or revised are based on needs and lessons learned from the grassroots.

The climate induced problem that this project is focused on is that the impacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT. Rural communities in NTT are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. Underlying causes of the problem include 1) Systemic vulnerabilities are high due to geographical and geophysical factors (remote and archipelagic area, with a naturally high climate variability); 2) Slow development progress in NTT (e.g. short term planning, reactive responses to problems, poor infrastructure and communication network); 3) Decentralization challenges (e.g. ineffective coordination, little attention to capacity development for sub-national institutions, 4) Community challenges such as low education levels, cultural perspectives on adopting new approaches and practices.

The project will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution: 1) Local government (including both provincial and district governments) has integrated climate resilience principles in policy, planning and budgeting, and have the institutional capacity to develop, implement and monitor this; and 2) Communities will strengthen and diversify their livelihoods in anticipation of further changes in the climate and its impacts. Identified barriers that local government and the communities are facing to improve livelihoods, food security and water security in a changing climate include informational, policy, financial, individual, and institutional barriers, with gender cutting across these.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (120.695800781 -8.63100145604)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Villages in Nusa Tenggara Timor province
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
5,000,000 (GEF/SCCF), 100,000 (UNDP)
Co-Financing Total: 
6,337,332 (UNDP), 67,873,318 (Government of NTT)
About: 

Rural communities in Nusa Tenggara Timur [NTT] are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. The climate-induced problem that this project is focused on is that the mpacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT.

SCCF funding will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security, to pave the way for climate resilient development in NTT. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution with regard to:

1. Local government and climate resilient development
2. Climate resilient rural communities

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

At the national level, the project will address climate resilience in terms of food, water and livelihood security in NTT, serving as a model for climate resilient development in an increasingly decentralized Indonesia. The project will thus contribute to MDG 1– Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger. Progress on this is of particular importance to NTT because the province has the highest prevalence of underweight children under five years of age, and almost a quarter of the NTT population is below the national poverty line.

Expected project outcomes are:
1. Institutional capacity developed to integrate climate resilience in sustainable development at provincial and district level
2. Livelihoods of vulnerable rural communities strengthened in a changing climate

At the provincial level, SCCF resources will be used to raise awareness, develop institutional capacity, and to integrate climate resilience in development planning, programmes and budgeting. This will indirectly benefit the whole population of NTT, which are 4.7 million people (about 960,000 households).

At the district level, SCCF resources will be invested in 3 districts for integrating climate resilience in district level development planning and programmes and access to knowledge and information, reaching out to all villages and households in these districts:
• Sabu Raijua which has a population size of 91,870 people (18,869 households), living in 58 villages (Desa) and 5 urban neighborhoods (Kelurahan). 
• East Sumba which has a population size of 225,906 people (46,465 households), living in 140 villages and 16 urban neighborhoods
• Manggarai which has a population of 512,065 (105,323 households) living in 132 villages and 17 urban neighborhoods

Out of these 330 villages, SCCF resources will be directly invested in 120 villages (approximately 34,000 households) to develop community vulnerability reduction assessments, community action plans, strengthen resilience of existing livelihoods, introduce alternative livelihoods, and develop climate resilient water resources management, to integrate climate resilience in community development plans, and to develop community based climate risk information system.
 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The project will be monitored through the following M& E activities:

Project start: 
A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan.

The Inception Workshop should address a number of key issues including:
a) Assist all partners to fully understand and take ownership of the project. Detail the roles, support services and complementary responsibilities of UNDP CO and RCU staff vis à vis the project team.  Discuss the roles, functions, and responsibilities within the project's decision-making structures, including reporting and communication lines, and conflict resolution mechanisms.  The Terms of Reference for project staff will be discussed again as needed.
b) Based on the project results framework and the relevant SOF (e.g. GEF) Tracking Tool if appropriate, finalize the first annual work plan.  Review and agree on the indicators, targets and their means of verification, and recheck assumptions and risks. 
c) Provide a detailed overview of reporting, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) requirements.  The Monitoring and Evaluation work plan and budget should be agreed and scheduled.
d) Discuss financial reporting procedures and obligations, and arrangements for annual audit.
e) Plan and schedule Project Board meetings.  Roles and responsibilities of all project organisation structures should be clarified and meetings planned.  The first Project Board meeting should be held within the first 12 months following the inception workshop.

An Inception Workshop report is a key reference document and must be prepared and shared with participants to formalize various agreements and plans decided during the meeting. 

Quarterly:
Progress made shall be monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Managment Platform.
Based on the initial risk analysis submitted, the risk log shall be regularly updated in ATLAS.  Risks become critical when the impact and probability are high.  Note that for UNDP GEF projects, all financial risks associated with financial instruments such as revolving funds, microfinance schemes, or capitalization of ESCOs are automatically classified as critical on the basis of their innovative nature (high impact and uncertainty due to no previous experience justifies classification as critical).
Based on the information recorded in Atlas, a Project Progress Reports (PPR) can be generated in the Executive Snapshot.
Other ATLAS logs can be used to monitor issues, lessons learned etc. The use of these functions is a key indicator in the UNDP Executive Balanced Scorecard.

Annually:
 Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR):  This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) reporting requirements. 

The APR/PIR includes, but is not limited to, reporting on the following:
• Progress made toward project objective and project outcomes - each with indicators, baseline data and end-of-project targets (cumulative) 
• Project outputs delivered per project outcome (annual).
• Lesson learned/good practice.
• AWP and other expenditure reports
• Risk and adaptive management
• ATLAS QPR
• Portfolio level indicators (i.e. GEF focal area tracking tools) are used by most focal areas on an annual basis as well. 

Periodic Monitoring through site visits:
UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-term of project cycle:
The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation at the mid-point of project implementation (insert date).  The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed. It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  The organization, terms of reference and timing of the mid-term evaluation will be decided after consultation between the parties to the project document. The Terms of Reference for this Mid-term evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.  The management response and the evaluation will be uploaded to UNDP corporate systems, in particular the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the mid-term evaluation cycle.

End of Project:
An independent Final Evaluation will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) guidance. The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals. The Terms of Reference for this evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.

The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities and requires a management response which should be uploaded to PIMS and to the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (e.g GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the final evaluation.

During the final three months, the project team will prepare the Project Terminal Report. This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and knowledge sharing:
Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects. Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this and related projects.

Audit: 
Project audit will follow UNDP Financial Rules and Regulations, and applicable Audit policies.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Alex Heikens
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SCCF
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Uzbekistan

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Uzbekistan" is working to pilot adaptation measures in Tashkent and Syrdarya provinces. These efforts are working to increase the adaptation capacity of health care system in the provinces to cope with climate induced diseases.

More specifically, the Uzbekistan project aims to reduce negative impacts of climatic drivers by equipping health care personnel and the wider population with essential tools and knowledge to prevent detrimental effects of climate on human health. Effective prevention will be monitored through the reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality of acute intestinal, cardio-vascular and respiratory diseases induced by climatic factors.

Uzbekistan is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments) and their related health risks.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (69.2552459245 41.3361191504)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The greatest national benefit envisaged in the implementation of this program will be the enhanced awareness and capacity of health workers and the community at large. In specific, the project is focused on piloting adaptation measures in two provinces: Tashkent and Syr-Darya.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

Uzbekistan Project Objective

To pilot adaptation measures in Tashkent and Syrdarya provinces that will increase adaptation capacity of health care system in these provinces to cope with climate induced diseases.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Uzbekistan will have significant health affects caused by climate change and rising temperatures. Most of the health problems are related to water and its availability. Water Borne diseases play a major role in Uzbekistan's health issues. More than 30% of household's nationwide lack quality drinking water and over 1000 settlements have no potable water at all. The water quality is poor with microbial and chemical pollution due to insufficient infrastructure to treat waste water and purify drinking water. Bacterial pollution increases in warmer temperatures and is reflected in the number of cases of intestinal diseases during summer.

As an example, bacterial dysentery increases by a factor of 3 in the summer. Dust storms are a particular problem for Uzbekistan and water shortages and increasing aridity caused by climate change coupled with land degradation problems have aggravated the desertification processes. As a major consequence, this has resulted in an increased number of dust storm events. Excessive exposure to dust constitutes a major health risk for many parts of the country already. For instance, Karakalpakstan exceeds the maximum safe threshold of the concentration of total suspension particles (TSP) by more than a factor of 2.  Winds transport the sand particles for long distances extending the geographic boundaries affected by this phenomenon and over 5.5 million people have become increasingly affected by the dust storms.

Results and Learning

The project aims to reduce negative impacts of climatic drivers on health by equipping health care personnel and the wider population with essential tools and knowledge to prevent the detrimental effects of climate on human health. The effective prevention will be monitored through the reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality of acute intestinal, cardio-vascular and respiratory diseases induced by climatic factors. It will achieve this by addressing the following barriers:

  • Knowledge - Health care system personnel are not fully aware of the relationship between climate change and variability and health impacts. There has been no specific training of the personnel in regard to adaptation to climate change and mitigating its negative health impacts.
  • Capacity - The level of knowledge and skills to prevent diseases connected with climatic factors are also limited among the general population.
  • Monitoring and surveillance - The climate and health monitoring and surveillance systems are not conducted at the right geographical and temporal scale that would allow observations of trends and make advance forecasts to direct interventions against climate sensitive diseases.
  • Research - No mechanisms currently exist to give early warning to the health system and undertake preventive measures. No research is currently conducted to observe the trends and the health system does not have clearly developed indicators that would give a chance to react. Thus no early warning system has been developed. 
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Benefits

The most significant benefit expected from this project is the reduced number of acute intestinal, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases that are induced by climate change. Other benefits include:

  • Improved general health of the national population and through this will contribute to the human development in Uzbekistan.
  • Increased knowledge and skills to monitor variations in climate and make preventive steps in order to minimize possible detrimental effects on human health.
  • The public will have enhanced knowledge on how to protect themselves against diseases that can be triggered by climate factors.
  • People would be equipped with the concrete instruments to cope with climate variability and change.
  • The Government will benefit from healthier and more economically active population and fewer social payments to disabled (sick) people.
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: An early warning system that provides reliable information on likely incidence of climate-sensitive health risks established

  1. Cooperation agreement on information flow sharing between governmental agencies is reached.
  2. Computer-based information system established to share climate change and health information to Government decision makers in the two pilot states.
  3. An early warning system of potential health impacts of climate events on vulnerable groups will be designed and tested.
  4. Contingency plans for health care system developed in the event of adverse climate variation.

Outcome 2: Skills and knowledge of health care personnel to cope with climate sensitive diseases enhanced and awareness of the population to take self-preventive measures for climate-induced diseases are increased

  1. Capacity building training programs for medical personnel and primary care workers on the relationship between diseases and climate developed and introduced.
  2. Increased awareness raising to the local population in the health risks associated with climate change and how to take self-preventive measures against climate sensitive diseases.

Outcome  3: Action plans to address climate sensitive diseases successfully implemented within the 2 study provinces

  1. Intervention plans for climate-sensitive health outcomes implemented within the study regions.
  2. Effectiveness of interventions will be monitored.

 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project coordination

Project activities will be executed following established UNDP national execution modality (NEF). The Ministry of Health will act as the Executing Agency (EA) for the project and will be executing the project in cooperation with WHO and UNDP-GEF. The project will establish a Project Implementation Unit (PIU) which will consist of the Project Manager (PM), and an administrative/finance assistant. National consultants will be recruited upon necessity according to an established plan of activities developed by the PM.

Contacts: 
Natalia Sharipova
WHO
Dr Michel Louis Marie Tailhades
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Kenya

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Kenya" is working to strengthen national focus and adaptive capacity to prevent epidemic highland malaria.

The Kenya project will provide training and development of tools to prepare malaria control programs to understand the influence of climate change and variability on the transmission risks of malaria in focalised areas.

Kenya is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments,) and their related health risks.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (35.2868011226 -0.367682342201)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The greatest national benefit envisaged in the implementation of this program will be the enhanced awareness and capacity of health workers and the community at large. Specifically, the beneficiaries of this project are the communities in the highlands of Kenya: Kericho zone, Nandi zone, Trans-nzoia zone and Kisii zone.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

Project scope

The pilot project will provide training and development of tools to prepare malaria control programs to understand the influence of climate change and variability on the transmission risks of malaria in focalised areas. A model for predicting highland malaria was developed in 2006 and validated with previously observed malaria epidemics. It indicated a very high utility in predicting malaria epidemics three months in advance at areas higher than 1800 m. This project aims to take the model to the next step by operationally validating it and developing better tools for malaria forecasting to support decision-making on public health interventions that help prevent epidemics. To be able to do this effectively the following areas of adaptive capacity development will the specifically targeted in the project:

  • Improved use of weather forecasting - Forecasting through global weather networks can provide the data needed to predict malaria epidemics. Currently there is limited access to short-term and long-term health specific weather information at the community, district and national levels.
  • Improved disease prediction capacity - The development of an Early Warning System will significantly improve preparedness for malaria epidemics, despite current deficiencies in the quality of routinely collected health data.
  • Improved epidemic preparedness, and disease detection - Districts have the capacity to develop plans for epidemic preparedness and response, however timely availability of the required resources has been a challenge. Most districts have adequate data to calculate threshold levels for existing epidemic detection only.
  • Improved outbreak response - Many barriers to effective response currently exist and will be addressed in the project.

Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Malaria has always existed in Kenya, however in the past, the higher altitudes of the highlands region limited highland malaria transmission to seasonal outbreaks, with considerable year-to-year variation.

Climate change is projected to make malaria control more difficult in many areas of Kenya.  In areas where malaria already occurs, transmission intensity is expected to increase along with the length of the transmission season. It is also expected that malaria will spread into new locations, particularly the higher altitudes of the highlands, where its prevalence is not currently actively monitored or forecasted. Communities living at altitudes above 1,100 meters are more vulnerable to malaria epidemics due to lack of immunity, lack of preparedness, climate variability and other factors.

Approximately 13 to 20 million Kenyans are at risk of malaria, with the percentage at risk increasing as climate change facilitates the movement of the malaria vector up the highlands.

Studies into the affect of climate change on health in Kenya also reported increases in acute respiratory infections for ASAL areas; emergence and re-emergence of Rift Valley fever; leishmaniasis and malnutrition.  Floods, occasional outbreaks of waterborne diseases e.g. cholera, dysentery and typhoid have been reported in lowland areas.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Benefits

The most significant benefit envisioned to arise from this project is the reduction in the burden of highland malaria epidemics. Additional benefits include:

  • Increased capacity of health actors to climate sensitive diseases.
  • Harmonized management structures across all provisions provided by the Annual Operational Plans (AOPs)
  • Additional Implementation of malaria epidemic prevention measures through the National Malaria Strategy.
  • Strengthening partnerships, including: meteorological department provision of forecasting data to the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI).
  • Improved interactions between health officers and stakeholders and sharing of resources and reduction in duplication of tasks within a district.
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: Climate-sensitive health risks are identified with sufficient lead-time for effective response

  1. Climate-sensitive health risk data are reported in timely and reliable manner to disease control agencies.
  2. Climate data are reported in timely and reliable manner to disease control agencies.
  3. Climate change-induced changes and drivers of health-risks are determined.

Outcome 2: Capacity of health sector institutions to respond to climate-sensitive health risks will be improved

  1. Clarified and harmonized institutional mandates and procedures to respond to climate risks to public health.
  2. Training syllabus and long-term support mechanisms for community and national level health  protection from climate change developed.

Outcome 3: Disease prevention measures piloted in areas of heightened health risk due to climate change

  1. Advance planning of responses for pilot regions.
  2. Preventative interventions applied on the basis of plan, in response to warning system information.

 

 

Contacts: 
WHO
Solomon Nzioka
WHO
Wilfred Ndegwa
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Jordan

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Jordan" is working to increase adaptive capacity to respond to health risks resulting from water scarcity induced by climate change.

The Jordan project will focus on; (i) strengthening monitoring and surveillance capacity, (ii) development of the necessary institutional and regulatory framework for safe use of wastewater; and (iii) increasing the capacity related to health protection measures and pilot testing these in the field.

Jordan is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments,) and their related health risks.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (35.9007628998 31.9791810374)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The greatest national benefit envisaged in the implementation of this program will be the enhanced awareness and capacity of health workers and the community at large.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

Jordan Project Objective

To increase adaptive capacity to respond to health risks resulting from water scarcity induced by climate change in Jordan.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Jordan is ranked among the poorest countries in the world in terms of water availability. Resources are already seriously limited and are far below under the water poverty line of (1000) m3 per capita per year. The threat of climate change will increase water scarcity. The lack of water and secondary effects of these changes are considered as the highest priority threat to health in Jordan.

Water scarcity will have a direct impact on the health of Jordanians. In 2005, a WHO/UNEP project determining minimum water requirements for health in Jordan showed a linkage between the per capita water consumption and the incidences of diarrhoea.

Due to the serious vulnerabilities of water scarcity, the national Government has prioritized the use of clean water for domestic supply. This should avoid much of the direct health risks from water scarcity: However, the proposed increase in use of wastewater reuse as an alternative water supply could raise a series of health risks.  Unless adequately managed, both untreated and to a lesser extent treated wastewater poses significant risks to health.

Increasing use of wastewater in agriculture, driven by climate change, will therefore increase the potential of intestinal diseases and exposure to toxic chemicals for farmers, consumers, and neighbouring communities.

Expected Benefits

The greatest benefit expected from this project is the elevated level of national preparedness and adaptation to protect human health from a key risk associated with climate change and variability. Other expected benefits include:

  • Enhanced coordination and cooperation among different governmental and non-governmental organization concerned with climate change adaptation  to protect human health.
  • Increased awareness and strengthened institutional capacity to address other health risks from climate change within Jordan.
  • All areas where wastewater reuse is practiced will have a safer and healthier environment and the health conditions of farmers and farm workers will also be improved.
  • Economic benefits will be attained on both national and local levels through fresh water savings and higher value of safer agricultural products.

Results and Learning:

This project will focus on; (i) strengthening monitoring and surveillance capacity, (ii) development of the necessary institutional and regulatory framework for safe use of wastewater; and (iii) increasing the capacity related to health protection measures and pilot testing these in the field.  To achieve this goal, several adaptive capacity issues will be addressed:

  • Standards and criteria - The use of treated water in agriculture and points of monitoring treated wastewater effluent is currently unregulated there is also no reuse criteria related to hygiene, public health and quality control or  irrigation techniques, degree of wastewater treatment, and choice of areas and types of crops to be irrigated.
  • Monitoring - The lack of efficient control and monitoring on safe practices of wastewater reuse in agriculture.
  • Capacity - The lack of trained personnel both in the competent authorities and the treatment plants.
  • Communication - The low level of awareness of the farmers and the public at large and the lack of communication and information dissemination between different parties involved.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: A comprehensive and integrated monitoring and surveillance systems for wastewater reuse activities is in place.

  • Coordination and implementation of existing monitoring systems of quality of treated wastewater used in agriculture are improved.
  • Coordination and implementation of existing monitoring systems for food safety are improved.
  • Heath and epidemiological surveillance programs provide reliable data on wastewater-related diseases, linked to water and food quality monitoring.
  • Social acceptance of agricultural products irrigated by treated wastewater is increased.

Outcome 2: Regulatory and institutional frameworks for management of health risks associated with increased wastewater reuse in unrestricted agriculture are improved and implemented.

  • National health guidelines or standards for safe wastewater reuse are developed and promoted.
  • Institutional responsibilities to operationalize the national health guidelines for safe wastewater re-use are defined.
  • A legislative tool to define institutional responsibilities for different components of the system is issued.
  • Institutional capacity needed to execute the system is established.

Outcome 3: Health protection measures for safe wastewater reuse are defined and implemented in X pilot sites.

  • A manual and operating procedure on health protection measures for all vulnerable groups (farmers, nearby communities, and consumers) is developed.
  • Operational wastewater reuse safety plan, applying the provisions of the national guidelines on safe wastewater reuse, is developed and implemented at 10 selected sites.
  • The manual and lessons learnt from applying the safety plan at the site are disseminated.
  • A mechanism for implementation of the needed safety plan at all farms using treated wastewater is established and enforced.

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project coordination

The project will be implemented in close co-operation and coordination with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation (MWI) and Ministry of Environment (MoE). The Executing Agency of the project will be the Government of Jordan, MWI. The National Technical Advisory Group (TAG) for the project will be the Inter-Ministerial Steering Committee (ISC). The ISC includes representatives from the MoH, MWI, Ministry of Planning, MoE, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Meteorology, a representative from CEHA/ WHO, a representative from UNDP/GEF, and representatives from major NGOs.

Contacts: 
WHO
Basel Al Yousfi
WHO
Mazen Malkawi
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Fiji

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Fiji" is working to increase the adaptive capacity of the health sector to respond to climate sensitive risks.

The Fiji project has been designed to increase the Ministry of Health’s capacity to monitor, assess and respond to hydro-meteorological disasters (HMDs) and Climate Sensitive Diseases (CSDs) and thus reduce health risks associated with climate change and variability.

Fiji is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments,) and their related health risks.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (178.187991157 -17.7989190171)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities living on Fiji’s inhabited islands
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

Fiji Project Objective

To increase the adaptive capacity of the health sector to respond to climate sensitive risks.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Fiji has conducted a study looking at which afflictions have a clear link with climate change. Dengue fever, diarrhoeal diseases (food and water borne) and nutrition-related illnesses were all shown to be linked to climate and have the potential to worsen with increasing climate change and variability.

Climate change (and the associated temperature rise) will impact dengue-fever by increasing the frequency of epidemics, as well as the possibility that a larger proportion of the population will be affected by each epidemic. With severe climate change there is even a chance that dengue will become endemic rather than occur in isolated epidemics. Improper water storage practices in water stricken areas have also been associated with an increase in mosquito breeding sites and the risk for related diseases.

Diarrhoeal disease may become more common if Fiji becomes warmer and wetter and if droughts and tropical cyclones occur more frequently, disrupting water supplies and sanitation systems.

Nutrition-related illnesses are most likely to be affected by increases in frequency and/or magnitude of tropical cyclone and drought events. Further, it is also likely that if climate change leads to economic and social disruption and environmental degradation, disadvantageous effects on health may be serious.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Benefits

The greatest national health benefit of the proposed project is having a functional Health Information System that is capable of generating Early Warning Systems for Climate Sensitive Diseases. Other linked benefits include:

  • Enabling field practitioners carry out required interventions as per requirement of EWARS Guidelines, the Psychosocial Intervention Guidelines.
  • Creating awareness amongst communities hence having communities that are more resilient to climate change and variability.
  • Strengthening both inter disciplinary collaboration and communication within all levels the Ministry of Health.
  • Strengthening inter sectoral collaboration at all levels with other key government agencies such as the Fiji Meteorological Service, the National Disaster Management Office.
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: An early warning system providing reliable information on likely incidence of climate sensitive health risks.

  1. Climate sensitive health risks/CSD reporting system with prediction modeling.
  2. Institutional strengthening of health and key multisectoral partners in data management across sectors.
  3. Timely dissemination of data and advocacy.
  4. Information systems supporting integrated assessments of climate change and risks in management and long term health planning.

Outcome 2: Capacity of health sector institutions to respond to climate sensitive health risks based on early warning systems improved.

  1. Clarified and harmonized institutional mandates and procedures to respond to climate risks to public  health.
  2. Health professionals in selected pilot regions have the capacity to respond to climate  sensitive health risks based  on early warning systems.
  3. Health professional in selected pilot regions have the capacity to effectively respond to HMDs and CSDs with specific attention on psychosocial intervention.

Outcome 3: Disease prevention measures piloted in areas of heightened health risk due to climate change

  1. Community members are aware of climate change on their community and take actions to make adaptations to minimize potential health risks.
  2. Community members are aware of CSDs, what to do when symptoms develop and how to take preventative  measures to avoid them.
  3. Community members are aware of the effects of climate change on their community and take actions to make adaptation to minimize potential risks.
  4. Detailed Communication Plans in place (for Outcomes 1-3).

 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Results and Learning:

This project has been designed to increase the Ministry of Health’s capacity to monitor, assess and respond to hydro-meteorological disasters (HMDs) and Climate Sensitive Diseases (CSDs) and thus reduce health risks associated with climate change and variability.  In order to be able to achieve this goal, several specific needs have been identified:

  • Mainstreaming and planning - Climate Sensitive Diseases need to be incorporated in the Strategic Planning stages of the Ministry of Health and specifically reflected in the National Health Outcomes as well as the Disaster Preparedness Plans and the National Contingency Plans for Drought and Floods.
  • Evaluation - National policies and plans have to be evaluated with specific attention to Watershed and Water Resource Management.
  • Assessments - Incorporation of Environmental and Health Impact Assessment (E&HIA) as an integral part of new land and infrastructure development approval, so as to address potential health issues, including those associated with climate change.
  • Response - Intensifying surveillance and response programmes for CSDs during HMDs and other disasters, and enhancing rapid and effective response, with specific attention to psychosocial intervention.
Contacts: 
Ministry of Health
Dr Salanieta Saketa
Mr Steven Iddings
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in China

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in China" is working to strengthen the national capacity to respond to the increased health risks due to heat waves in China.

The project will focus on reducing the impacts of climate change on cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in the three project cities through the implementation of heat wave forecasting and early warning systems designed to protect human health.

China is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments,) and their related health risks.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (126.645272745 45.7532092901)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local governments, including health, meteorological, education, transportation, finance departments and the individuals in the pilot communities (i.e. three large cities in China, each with a population over 6 million: Harbin, Nanjing, Guangzhou).
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

China's Project Objective

To strengthen the national capacity to respond to the increased health risks due to heat waves in China.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

China, with its fragile ecological environment, is vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change. In recent years, China has experienced more frequent and higher intensity extreme weather events. Floods, heat waves, freezing rain, snow weather etc which were once rare now happen on a regular basis causing great harm to health and society. The largest impact on health from climate change in China is heat; particularly in urban environments which can change the incidence and mortality of heat or cold related disease.

China experienced extremely hot summers in 1988, 1990, 1994, 1998, 1999, 2002 to 2008, resulting in thousands of excessive deaths. Mortality was particularly high among those 60 years of age and older, and heat waves present serious risks to infants. It is estimated that the number of deaths caused by the recorded heat waves is 2-3 times above normal summer periods. These deaths could be greatly reduced with an early warning system in place.  Heat waves can also increase the morbidity and mortality due to cerebro-cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases.

Cerebro-cardiovascular diseases already have a huge impact in China, with the country having the highest morbidity of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in the world. 45% of all deaths in China, is due to cerebro-cardiovascular diseases. The health care cost and labour force loss from cerebro-cardiovascular diseases is more than US$2,500 million per year.  This burden will only increase with climate change and rising temperatures.

Expected Benefits

The most significant benefit of implementing effective adaptive measures will be the reduction of the incidence and mortality of the cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, thus improving people's quality of life and greatly reducing the social-economic burden.
Other benefits include:

  • Facilitating the harmonization of health issues with economic development.
  • Strengthening health education and training on the impacts of climatic change on the environment and human health.
  • Increase awareness of the potential impacts climatic change across various media.

Results and Learning:

The project will focus on reducing the impacts of climate change on cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in the three project cities through the implementation of heat wave forecasting and early warning systems designed to protect human health. The project will do this with a focus on the following capacity development:

  • Data collection - Additional data collection and research is needed to quantify the health risks of climate change and to identify effective and efficient adaptation options.
  • Data sharing - There are still some gaps in data sharing among environmental, meteorological and health agencies. Therefore a scientific research database will be created using national and international meteorological and disease data; this database will provide accurate, prompt, and authoritative disease monitoring and will produce products relevant for disease prevention.
  • Communication and Cooperation - The project will strengthen communication between decision-makers and the public health system. It also will encourage and support Chinese scientists to participate in the international activities to reduce the health impacts of climate change.
  • Public awareness - There is limited public knowledge of the health impacts of climate change and the actions individuals should take to protect themselves, particularly during heat waves.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: An early warning system is established for impending heat waves to protect people at risk of cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases.

  • Establishment of a multi-sectoral cooperation mechanism of health sector, meteorological bureau and environmental protection bureau.
  • Collection and analysis of information on the relationship between meteorological and health data to establish a model to forecast health risks for vulnerable groups.
  • Design of a system for “early forecast, early prevention and early treatment”, providing graded forecasts of the severity of health risks in the project community.

Outcome 2: Systemic and institutional capacity of health sector will be improved to respond to climate-sensitive health risks.

  • Setting up a steering committee for actions during heat waves, and implementing resource sharing, information and skill exchange.
  • Community medical consulting personnel trained with respect to health risks during climate extremes, necessary health consultations and services, and self-protection measures.

Outcome 3: Improve the adaptation capacities and emergency medical plans implemented for cases of cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases during heat waves.

  • Emergency plan and support system established for high risk people in the project sites.
  • Public awareness raised through a coordinated media campaign, including videocasts with health education lectures, and regular update of health education and consulting services in communities and schools.
  • Communication and education provided to Government and other decision makers on health risks associated with extreme heat, and effective behavioural responses.
  • Strengthened bilateral and multilateral cooperation through the participation and communication of decision-makers, government officers and researchers in international exchange.

 

Contacts: 
WHO
Mr Mao Jixiang
Ministry of Health P.R. China
Mr. Zhao Yuechao
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Bhutan

 As part of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNDP, global project on public health adaptation to climate change, the "Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health in Bhutan" is working to strengthen national capacity to identify and prevent adverse climate change related health outcomes.

This pilot project will provide better information and surveillance of climate change related health risks in Bhutan. Improved data collection will allow the country to monitor and receive early warnings and thus the opportunity to prepare and respond to potential health risks. The project will also provide training and development of tools for health providers to understand the influence of climate change and variability on the transmission of vector borne diseases, extreme weather events and other health issues.

Bhutan is one of seven countries taking part in this Global Pilot. The seven countries, Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan, together represent four distinct environments (Highlands, Small Islands, Arid Countries and Urban environments,) and their related health risks.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (89.7350463644 27.4744753599)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The greatest national benefit envisaged in the implementation of this program will be the enhanced awareness and capacity of health workers and the community at large.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

The objective of this first global project on public health adaptation to climate change is to “increase adaptive capacity of national health system institutions, including field practitioners, to respond to climate-sensitive health risks”. This will contribute to the broader goal of ensuring that “Health sectors are able to cope with health risks resulting from climate change, including variability”.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Bhutan suffers from high rates of a series of climate-sensitive health burdens.  Projected temperature rise (higher in mountainous areas than elsewhere in the world) is likely to increase the probability of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF); increases in the geographic range and incidence of vector-borne diseases, particularly malaria and dengue; and increase in the incidence of water borne diseases. With an estimated 2,674 glacial lakes in Bhutan, and 24 considered potentially dangerous, GLOF’s represent a major climate change concern in the country. Major incidents of glacial lake outbursts have been documented 1957, 1960, and 1994.  Flash floods and landslides are also common during the monsoon period of June to August.

Vector Borne diseases are becoming more prevalent in Bhutan due to the increasing temperatures. Two types of malaria are prevalent in Bhutan: the more severe Plasmodium falciparum (30-60% of cases) and Plasmodium vivax with over 50% of the population residing in malarial areas.  Dengue is an emerging infectious disease in Bhutan.  Dengue was first documented in Bhutan in 2004 and is now endemic during the monsoon period.

Diarrhoeal diseases represent a significant cause of morbidity in Bhutan for the last decade and contribute to about 10-15 % of the morbidity cases.  Climate change has also influenced water resources due to drying up of water sources or contamination due to flooding, increasing incidences of diarrhoeal disease.

Results and Learning:

This pilot project will provide better information and surveillance of climate change related health risks in Bhutan. Improved data collection will allow the country to monitor and receive early warnings and thus the opportunity to prepare and respond to potential health risks.  The project will also provide training and development of tools for health providers to understand the influence of climate change and variability on the transmission of vector borne diseases, extreme weather events and other health issues. To be able to do this effectively the following areas of adaptive capacity have been identified to be particularly targeted by the project:

  • Metrological and surveillance data - Bhutan has very limited metrological data and sparsely located metrological stations. There is also very limited surveillance for climate-sensitive health outcomes, resulting in insufficient data and lack of awareness of the possible health impacts of climate change across all government sectors including health.
  • Resources - There is a lack of sufficient national capacity in terms of human and financial resources for incorporating climate change risks into all levels of health activities.
  • Climate change mainstreamed - National Programs dealing with the climate sensitive diseases like the National Vector borne Disease Control Program (VDCP), ARI and Diarrhoeal Disease programs, Water and Sanitation programs do not currently take climate change into account.
  • Improved coordination - A new Environmental Health program has been formed in the Ministry of Health to coordinate and take through the climate and health initiatives.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Benefits

The greatest national benefit envisaged in the implementation of this program will be the enhanced awareness and capacity of health workers and the community at large.
Additional benefits include:

  • Helping to plan and sustain the Vector borne Disease Control Program take into consideration the impact of climate change on the increase of malaria, DHF and vector diseases in the country.
  • Contribute towards improvement in rural water quality and community sanitation.
  • Help create awareness on the health impacts of climate change.
  • Improved rural water quality and community sanitation.
Project Components:
  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks
Expected Outputs:

Outcome 1: Risk Assessment and integrated surveillance enhanced for effective management of climate sensitive health risks.

  • Vulnerability and impact assessment determines high-risk areas and populations, and establishes the disease burden (baseline) of climate sensitive diseases.
  • Integrated surveillance and alert network system piloted across high-risk (riverine and highland) areas to monitor and provide early detection of changes in climate sensitive diseases and health risks.

Outcome 2: Community and health sector institutions have improved capacity to respond to climate-sensitive health risks.

  • Professional skills and health system strengthen in areas identified to have higher risks of extreme weather events or disasters, and epidemic diseases by providing training, capacity building and institutional support.
  • Strengthened awareness of climate relevance to health amongst national policy makers, and improved multi-sector health coordination improves effectiveness of prevention, monitoring and management of health risks.
  • Increased community awareness, capacity and empowerment helps communities prepare for and cope with increased stresses on the community posed by climate change or emergencies.

Outcome 3: Emergency preparedness and disease prevention measures implemented in areas of heightened health risk due to climate change.

  • Implementation of Health sector Emergency Contingency Plan.
  • Scale up and targeting of community level interventions for control of water and vector borne diseases, mental health and nutritional issues.

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project coordination

The Environmental Health Unit (EHU), Department of Public Health (DoPH), and Ministry of Health (MoH) will be the principal executing agencies for the PDF-B phase of the project. The EHU will be the central coordinating body which is responsible for implementation, liaising with other units, sections and programs, as well as for timely reporting, monitoring and evaluation of the project. A Project Steering Committee (PSC) will be created in order to advise the Environmental Health Unit team, Department of Public Health. The PSC includes several Government Ministries as well as WHO and UNDP.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
WHO
Thinlay Dorji
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 

Piloting climate change adaptation to protect human health in Barbados

This project will include two areas of action. The first will use treated wastewater to recharge an aquifer, while minimizing health impacts. The second will focus on using wastewater for irrigation, while ensuring no increase in adverse health outcomes. Results from the pilot projects will be used to develop water quality standards for the use of treated wastewater, policies and procedures to ensure adequate aquifer recharge and safe and effective use of wastewater for irrigation, and increase the proportion of the community who are aware of the need for the use of treated wastewater. 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-59.6143799275 13.1589997853)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the whole island of Barbados
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
550,000 USD
About: 

Barbados Project Objective

To strengthen national adaptive capacity to address health issues related to climate change attributable water scarcity.

Key Health Concerns and Vulnerability to Climate Change

Barbados is already classified as a water scarce country.  A further reduction in the availability of water, due to changes in precipitation patterns could lead to serious health impacts.  Climate change is expected to affect the quantity and quality of available water.  Previous projects concluded that sea level rise causing saline intrusion and changing weather patterns will adversely affect the water supply.  With a limited water supply in the future there will be competition between various sectors with regards to the use of water.

Water scarcity can cause a variety of health problems by reducing the amount of water available to practice basic hygiene and by increasing the risk of chemical and microbial contamination; these can lead to gastrointestinal diseases and other health risks.  Treated wastewater will be needed for non-potable purposes in the future; this will require effective management of the resultant health risks.

Barbados has the highest rate of dengue fever in the Americas.  Studies in the Caribbean show an association between climate variability and increasing incidence of dengue fever. Rainwater storage is being promoted as an adaptation option to increase availability of freshwater, however, environmental health officers report an increase in the Aedes aegypti index due to mosquito breeding in domestic rainwater storage tanks.  To reduce the negative impacts on public health, there are requirements to improve storage facilities to eliminate vector breeding, provide technical guidelines with regards to the construction and maintenance of water tanks, and to increase public awareness with regards to effective and safe water storage.

Results and Learning:
This project will include two areas of action. The first will use treated wastewater to recharge an aquifer, while minimizing  health impacts. The second will focus on using wastewater for irrigation, while ensuring no increase in adverse health outcomes.  Results from the pilot projects will be used to develop water quality standards for the use of treated wastewater, policies and procedures to ensure adequate aquifer recharge and safe and effective use of wastewater for irrigation, and increase the proportion of the community who are aware of the need for the use of treated wastewater. These results will be achieved through addressing the following adaptive capacity issues:

  • Resources - There is a lack of sufficient national capacity in terms of human and financial resources for incorporating climate change risks into health sector activities.
  • Governance - There are a lack of guidelines and legislation for water storage. This means that any new storage facility that is developed does not take into consideration climate change and the related health impacts.
  • Waste water capacity - There is also a lack of capacity with regards to wastewater reuse issues. Barbados has little experience with regards to utilizing wastewater for non-potable purposes or for aquifer recharge. Human and technological capacity can be improved in this area.
  • Communication and Information - There is a significant lack of information and therefore communication on climate change and it impacts in Barbados. This includes those in the health sector as well as the general public.  Linked to this, there is a shortage of communication to the general public on climate change issues and how certain diseases, particularly dengue are related to climate.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Benefits

The most substantial benefit expected to arise from this project is the reduced incidence of dengue fever while increasing water safety and
availability. Other significant benefits include:

  • Improved coordination and cooperation between relevant governmental and nongovernmental organizations.
  • Improved practices for the storage of rainwater, preventing the breeding of Aedes aegypti.
  • Increased awareness of A. aegypti breeding sites in rainwater tanks as well as other potential breeding sites and the reduction of overall breeding opportunities.
  • The level of public knowledge will be enhanced in regards to wastewater reuse.

Project Components:

  1. Climate change and health early warning and planning  systems
  2. Institutional and technical capacity to manage  climate change health risks
  3. Demonstration Measures to reduce vulnerability
  4. Regional Cooperation to address climate change health risks

Outcome 1: Policies and Programs are implemented to ensure health risks do not increase as a result of using treated wastewater to recharge aquifers and for irrigation.

  • Develop Procedures and guidelines for the effective recharge of aquifers using wastewater.
  • Develop Strategies, policies and procedures for the use of wastewater for irrigation, ensuring that the quality and safety of agriculture crops is assured.
  • Develop guidelines and standards for the safe use of wastewater.
  • Develop monitoring systems for using wastewater in agriculture and aquifer recharge.

Outcome 2: Public acceptance of the use of treated wastewater for non potable use.

  • Social Acceptance of the use of treated wastewater.

Outcome 3: Public safely stores water to prevent the breeding of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

  • Enhance current rainwater storage facilities for the prevention of the breeding of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

 

 

 

Contacts: 
Winfred Greaves
Government of Barbados
Honourable Donville O. Inniss
WHO
Dr Berzabe C. Butron Riveros
WHO
Sally Edwards
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
WHO
Joy Guillemot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: