Regional

Taxonomy Term List

Regional project for the conservation and sustainable development of Lake Chad

Lake Chad is home to a growing population that has urgent needs to address the impacts of climate change on the water resources and the ecosystem of the basin. It provides for millions of people living in Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Niger and Nigeria, and a diverse range of environmental services. It is also an important center for the provisioning of food and water, supporting land and nutrient cycling, regulatory ground water replenishment, carbon sequestration, air purification, as well as a wonderful spot for simple recreation.

Over the last 45 years, Lake chad has lost 90 percent of its volume and surface area, creating serious environmental, economic and social challenges for people whose lives and livelihoods depend on the lake. Environmental resources are critical to the survival of the Lake Chad population, both for subsistence and economic growth. The escalating degradation of water resources and ecosystems is exacerbated by the current security challenge and the subsequent migration of livestock and people in search of a better life. In 2008 a previous UNDP-supported GEF-financed project assisted the countries and the Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC) in preparing a regional transboundary diagnostic analysis leading to a regionally endorsed Strategic Action Programme (SAP).

The “Improving Lake Chad management through building climate change resilience and reducing ecosystem stress through implementation of the Strategic Action Programme for the Lake Chad basin” project has a focus to initiate the implementation of the SAP with the overall objective to achieve climate resilient, integrated ecosystem-based management of the Lake Chad Basin through implementation of agreed policy, legal and institutional reforms, and investments that improve water quality and quantity, protect biodiversity, and sustain livelihoods. Meeting this objective will address concerns linked to the management capacity of the LCBC and its member countries to develop and implement sustainable management policies and to address unsustainable land/water practices responding to the SAP and the regionally agreed Water Charter.

The project will focus on developing and implementing policies, investments and improved integrated ecosystem-based lake management through enhanced basin-wide monitoring, and developing and managing regional projects in accordance with the basin’s priorities expressed in the Lake Chad SAP and other relevant strategic documents for the Lake Chad Basin.

Project outputs include: Strengthened and harmonised approaches to implementing sustainable legal and policy instruments across the Lake Chad Basin countries (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria) leading to greater water availability through effective conjunctive use management of surface and groundwater; technical capacity and awareness of national ministries, institutions and other stakeholders (e.g. academia, civil society) strengthened to contribute to the sustainable management practices of the natural resources in the Lake Chad basin at both national and basin levels; LCBC and member states operating and utilising data and information from management information system for effective and sustainable land, water, and biodiversity resources management; LCBC, national governments and local communities gain practical experience and upscaling validation on sustainable ecosystem management and alternative livelihoods; assessment of stress reduction and livelihood strengthening activities identified in the SAP leads to a broad investment programme to further assist SAP implementation.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (14.527588299127 13.044161588787)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$6 million
Co-Financing Total: 
US$236 million (US$1.9 million UNDP, US$5.8 million LCBC, US$216 million partner governments, US$9.4 million GIZ, US$2.5 million IUCN)
Project Details: 

The relationship between environmental (natural) resources, livelihood and conflicts has long been established in literature. Environmental resources are critical to the survival of the Lake Chad population, both for subsistence and for economic growth. The basin’s population live mostly in rural areas and are strongly dependent on their natural resources. Desertification and the effects of climate change exacerbate the overexploitation of these natural resources.

The escalating degradation of water resources and ecosystems is further exacerbated by the current security challenge and the subsequent migration of livestock and people in search of more secure lives and livelihoods.

In the long term, it is crucial to secure the environmental conditions for prosperity, stability and equity, through long-term and co-ordinated management responses to the scale of the environmental challenges. In its vision 2015, the LCBC has expressed the responsibility of the Lake Chad Basin (LCB) Member States on the “common heritage-and other wetlands maintained at sustainable levels to ensure the economic security of the freshwater ecosystem resources, sustainable biodiversity and aquatic resources of the basin, the use of which should be equitable to serve the needs of the population of the basin, thereby reducing the poverty level”). Achieving this vision is still facing many difficulties in the Lake Chad Basin.

There is a crucial need to harmonise policies, legislation, enforcements, incentives, etc., between member states and on a regional basis to address environmental and socio-economic issues and mitigate disaster risks. A further challenge remains the absence of suitable mechanisms and instruments for mobilising internal and external financial resources, aimed at progressively achieving self-sufficiency for the sustainable management of resources in the Lake Chad Basin. Lastly, failing to integrate the risks of climate change and to build the resilience of the population will undermine all efforts to sustain the water resources, ecosystems and socio-economic development of the Lake Chad Basin and its inhabitants.

The project will address concerns linked to the management capacity of the LCBC and member countries to develop and implement sustainable management policies to rectify unsustainable land/water practices and respond to climate change threats in accordance with the agreed SAP (and any updates).

The project will take advantage of key achievements of the previous (and ongoing) projects and regional policy agreements that have been strengthening LCBC capability for effective transboundary lake management. LCBC has acquired knowledge of Lake Chad’s potential resources and produced an inventory regarding the hydrology, geology, pedology and climatology with the support of international institutions. However, at the national level, the harmonization of sectoral policies for integrated management of land and water resources and ecosystems, and the capacity of the countries to address these issues remains a major challenge.

Addressing challenges

At the UNFCCC CoP 21 in Paris (December 2015), the high-profile problem of the significant loss of volume (90%) and surface area (90%) of Lake Chad over the last 45 years has been highlighted. The basin has suffered multiple years of declining rainfall. In addition to the climate change threats, the Lake Chad Basin Strategic Action Programme (SAP) (based on a Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis - TDA) developed and endorsed by the riparian countries in 2008, identified the following interlinked transboundary issues that need to be addressed within the Lake Chad Basin:

  • Variability of the hydrological regime and fresh water availability: the drastic decrease in fresh water availability in the LCB is a major concern. This is a result of variability in the hydrological regimes of the rivers and rainfall regimes in the region. Some of the root causes contributing to the overall degradation of the lake and its ecosystems include the absence of sustainable development in the political programs of the member states to handle the population pressure, and the insufficient awareness of stakeholders. The ecosystems degradation has led to continuing decline in local access to water, crop failures, livestock deaths, collapsed fisheries and wetlands services, etc. As identified in the SAP, the socioeconomic consequences of these impacts include food insecurity and declining health status of the population. Variability of the hydrological regime and fresh water availability is considered to be the most significant problem, not only due to the above impacts, but also because it drives or contributes to the other six transboundary problems.
  • Water pollution: it is one of the immediate causes of biodiversity loss in the wetlands. The use of agrochemicals for commercial cotton and rice production, and the increasing oil exploitation in Chad with a lack of working regulations and environmental standards will increase inorganic chemical pollution and eutrophication of the Lake in the near future.  Moreover, the increasing urbanization resulting from the oil exploitation in Chad risks giving rise to domestic waste and increases pollution from oil spills. If these trends are maintained, the likelihood for drastic fisheries depletion and wider ecological damage is high.
  • Decreased viability of biological resources: the stress created by the overexploitation of the natural resources of Lake Chad are undermining the ability of the plant and animal populations to maintain their normal regenerative rate. There is an absence of appropriate and harmonized policies and plans between the Member States to regulate basin activities coupled by the insufficient awareness of the local population in the member states on environmental issues. It also contributes to biodiversity loss and increasing variability of hydrological regime and fresh water availability.
  • Loss of biodiversity: concerns the loss of plant and animal species, as well as damages to ecosystem health. It is rooted in population growth, absence of sustainable development in political programs, and low environmental awareness. This reduces ecosystem productivity and thus resources availability, resulting in deepening poverty. It also contributes to the decreasing viability of biological resources.
  • Loss and modification of ecosystems:  The TDA has identified extensive habitat and community modification that has been experienced in the lake and the river environment. The lake, for example, has changed from open water to a marshy environment, and about 50% of wetlands have been destroyed. This has been due predominantly to reduced flows resulting from the lack of sustainable development in the member states, as well as a low level of environmental awareness. The impact of the loss/modification of ecosystems has most impact on the decline of some fisheries and rice cultivation, as well as on biodiversity loss and the decreased viability of biological resources.
  • Sedimentation in rivers and water bodies: this has led to changes in channel flow patterns, a reduction in the inflows to the lake through channel diversion, and the colonisation of the silted sites by invasive species. It is driven mainly by unsustainable farming practices on marginal lands and is rooted in low environmental awareness, population pressure, and absence of sustainable development on the political agenda of the member states.
  • Invasive species: The Lake is being invaded by typha grass and water hyacinth. Typha is also a major problem in the Komadugu Yobe Basin, and quelea birds are the major pest prevalent all over the basin. Invasive species, to a large extent, are a function of poor water resources management, poor enforcement of environmental regulations and standards, etc. The typha grass blocks river channels and diverts flows, while the quelea destroys crops, both contributing to poverty through the loss of livelihoods.

 

Recognising that the development of the TDA was over a decade ago and there have been significant additions to the knowledge-base in the region, including on climate variability and change, and groundwater resources, the TDA is currently being updated (by GIZ) and this UNDP-GEF project will update the SAP. It is not expected that there will be significant changes to the above identified transboundary problems however the new and emerging regional issues (e.g. climate impacts and conjunctive use aspects of groundwater) will be incorporated to enhance the overall planning and decision making.

Alignment with ongoing strategies

The project is supportive of elements of the National Adaption Programmes of Actions (NAPAs) under the UNFCCC for CAR, Chad and Niger and the recent (2015) Lake Chad Development and Climate Resilience Plan (the project assistance will provided strengthen data and information management to aid the DRR plans for floods and droughts). The project is also consistent with, and supportive of, the World Bank’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) for all the Lake Chad Basin Countries.

All member states have developed NAPA as a response to climate change. The LCBC under this project will review each country’s NAPA and coordinate the implementation of aspects that falls within the transboundary mandate of the LCBC and the objectives of the Lake Chad Basin Water Charter.

Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria have each developed and adopted a national biodiversity strategy and action plans aligned with Aichi Biodiversity Targets. In each of the biodiversity strategy, attention is paid to the role of biodiversity in poverty reduction and sustainable development. This project shall work within the goals of each country’s NBSAP and identify opportunities to coordinate transboundary implementation within Lake Chad Basin.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1: Effective transboundary lake catchment management through a strengthened Lake Chad Basin Commission

Output 1.1: The 2008 SAP updated on the basis of the revised TDA

Output 1.2: LCBC Biodiversity Protocol developed and adopted by all parties

Output 1.3: Disaster risk reduction response plans developed to ensure the protection of people, the environment and water resources

Output 1.4: LCBC’s coordination and monitoring capacity strengthened with effective reporting of performance to the Council of Ministers

Output 1.5: Strengthening LCBC’s capacity to develop and manage programmes and projects

Component 2: Establishment of effective, sustainable national governance structures to support the SAP and Water Charter

Output 2.1: Harmonising the national legal and policy frameworks for effective conjunctive management of surface and groundwaters to reflect the relevant provisions of the Water Charter

Output 2.2: Operationalize national inter-ministerial committees to improve coordination and support the policy mainstreaming process at the national level

Component 3: Capacity of national ministries, institutions and other stakeholders (e.g. academia, civil society) strengthened to support the harmonisation of policies and improved monitoring and management of the Lake Chad basin ecosystem

Output 3.1: Training national authorities on technical and environmental management

Output 3.2: Increase capacity in national research and academic institutions in the basin to conduct assessments on emerging issues in the Lake Chad basin and produce policy and management recommendations.

Output 3.3: Develop participation capacities and provide environmental awareness training of basin users

Component 4: Monitoring, Modelling and Data/Information for Integrated Management of Basin Water, Land and Biodiversity Resources

Output 4.1 Transboundary lake basin monitoring system designed and agreed by all member states.

Output 4.2: Contribution to GEF IW:LEARN related activities for information sharing and knowledge management

Component 5. Implementing targeted community-based pilot projects to demonstrate local / national / regional stress reduction benefits in support of SAP implementation

Output 5.1:  Regional/National pilot projects to control invasive plant species

Output 5.2: Promote ecosystem-based income-generating activities through sustainable financing schemes established at the national/local levels

Output 5.3: Development of National Replication sustainability strategies for community-based actions

Component 6: Pre-feasibility studies to identify Lake Chad SAP investment opportunities

Output 6.1: Assessment of potential investments based on the SAP recommendations

Output 6.2: Pre-feasibility studies on potential bankable investments with outline budgets, scope of work and timescales

 

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 
Why Lake Chad Basin governors’ forum was established — UNDP

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on Wednesday said its decision to facilitate the establishment of the Lake Chad Basin Governors’ Forum was to ensure regional stabilisation, peace-building and sustainable development in the region. The Forum consists of governors from the seven States and provinces in the Lake Chad Basin region, including those in Cameroun, Chad, Niger and Nigeria. The officials were in Maiduguri, Borno State to discuss and agree on a framework for stabilising, building peace and fostering sustainable development across the Basin considered the epicentre of the Boko Haram crisis. Diminishing water levels of the Lake Chad, shared by eight countries in the region has pushed an estimated 12 per cent of the more than 370 million people who depend on it for crop and livestock farming, fishing, commerce and trade to abject poverty. The situation has triggered mass migration, conflicts and crises in the region, including the nine-year long Boko Haram insurgency, which resulted in mass displacement of millions across the region. The UNDP said the Boko Haram crisis traced to development-related challenges including multi-dimensional poverty has caused billions of dollars in damages to property and disruption of livelihoods in North-east Nigeria. At the inaugural meeting, the governors highlighted the need for all countries affected by the crisis to come together to tackle the challenges in the Basin. In a statement at the end of the meeting sent to PREMIUM TIMES on Wednesday the governors agreed to establish the Lake Chad Basin Governors’ Forum. UNDP spokesperson, Lucky Musonda, said the Forum was a platform to enhance joint efforts towards “stabilising, building peace and fostering sustainable development across the region”.

Premium Times
Thursday 10 May 2018

 

Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Component 1: Effective transboundary lake catchment management through a strengthened Lake Chad Basin Commission

Component 2: Establishment of effective, sustainable national governance structures to support the SAP and Water Charter

Component 3: Capacity of national ministries, institutions and other stakeholders (e.g. academia, civil society) strengthened to support the harmonisation of policies and improved monitoring and management of the Lake Chad basin ecosystem

Component 4: Monitoring, Modelling and Data/Information for Integrated Management of Basin Water, Land and Biodiversity Resources

Component 5: Implementing targeted community-based pilot projects to demonstrate local / national / regional stress reduction benefits in support of SAP implementation

Component 6: Pre-feasibility studies to identify Lake Chad SAP investment opportunities

Japan Caribbean Climate Change Partnership

The Challenge

Climate change is recognized as one of the challenges which compounds inherent vulnerabilities in the Caribbean; it could significantly increase the risk of hurricanes and storms and threaten the region’s development. Increasing coastal erosion and severe coral reef bleaching events in 2005 and 2010 bear witness to this. Tourism and agriculture will be among the sectors most negatively impacted by these climatic changes. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirms that small islands are highly vulnerable to climatic and non-climatic stressors, with sea level rise and temperature rise among the most insidious threats for coastal flooding and erosion, ecosystem degradation and loss of livelihoods. Further, inadequate awareness, information, technical and policy capacity, and limited funding availability for informing and formulating a low-emissions development strategy are among the reasons that it has been difficult to direct and guide climate change mitigation investments in the Caribbean. In sum, climate change threatens to undermine decades of progress and effort. As a result, it is a focal area for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), being explicitly identied in goal 13 but also encompassing other goals.

The Solution

Recognising that persistent climate-related liabilities will continue to undermine their potential for sustainable development, Caribbean countries are focusing their post-2015 long-term sustainable development strategies on the principles of climate risk management and resilience building – understood as market transformations based on “adjustments in ecological, social, or economic systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli and their eects or impacts.” Studies have shown that cost-effective adaptation and risk mitigation solutions can help to avoid up to 90% of expected losses. The Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership (J-CCCP) brings together policy makers, experts and representatives of communities to encourage policy innovation for climate technology incubation and diffusion. By doing so, the initiative aims to ensure that barriers to the implementation of climate-resilient technologies are addressed and overcome in a participatory and efficient manner. Policy instruments such as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) provide tailored frameworks to expand access to clean energy and to prioritise adaptation measures. As a result, concrete mitigation and adaptation will be implemented on the ground, in line with countries' long-term strategies.

Building upon and supported by the NAMAs and NAPs, the partnership will support the incubation of climate technology into targeted public sectors, private industries, and community groups and enterprises so that green, low-emission climate-resilient technologies can be tested, refined, adopted, and sustained as a practical measure to enhance national, sub-national and community level resilience. These technologies will help reduce the dependence on fossil fuel imports, setting the region on a low emission development path; as well as improve the region’s ability to respond to climate risks and opportunities in the long-run, through resilient development approaches that go beyond disaster response to extreme events. The Partnership will include the following eight Caribbean countries: the Belize, Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, the republic of Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and the Republic of Suriname. The Government of Japan has provided financial and technical support for this project, with UNDP acting in the capacity of implementing partner.


 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-62.226562504703 17.486911106985)
Presentation
Assessments and Background Documents
Manual
Project Brief / Fact Sheet
Reports
Communications Products
ProDocs

Water Woes Lessened with J-CCCP Support

Launch of the 'Beat the Clock' Campaign in Grenada

Launch of J-CCCP Pilot Projects in Grenada

J-CCCP Mid-term Lessons Learned Review

J-CCCP 'Beat the Clock' Campaign Video

SIEGE ON MY LAND - Guyana's Battle with Climate Change Premiere Highlights

Climate Change Animation for Suriname [Dutch]

Youth Climate Change Conference 2017 Highlights

SIEGE ON MY LAND - Guyana's Battle with Climate Change - A Short Film

Launch of the J-CCCP Solar-PV Pilot Project in Bartica, Guyana

J-CCCP 'Beat the Clock' Campaign Video

J-CCCP 'Feel the Change' Campaign Overview

J-CCCP 'Feel the Change' Campaign Video

J-CCCP Pilot Projects in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Expected Results

Indicator Baseline Target (end of project)
Outcome 1: NAMAs and NAPs to promote alternative low-emission and climate-resilient technologies that can support energy transformation and adaptation in economic sectors are formulated and institutionalized 1A. Number of countries where implementation of comprehensive measures - plans, strategies, policies, programmes and budgets - to achieve low-emission and climate-resilient development objectives have improved (SP1.4.2) Some Caribbean countries have developed urgent and immediate plans for adaptation and other related climate change strategies and started their implementation, with some having coordination mechanisms in place to integrate them into the development process as well as other elements which could be used for medium to long-term planning. 6 countries with developed and validated  NAMAs (supported under this initiative)
 
1B. Number of countries with disaster reduction and/or integrated disaster reduction and adaptation plans (disaggregated by gender responsiveness), and dedicated institutional frameworks and multi-stakeholder coordination mechanisms (SP5.2.1) Almost all Caribbean countries report on lack of capacity, data, expertise, institutions and financial resources to undertake medium- to long -term oriented impact assessment and adaptation planning 1 country with coordination mechanism that advance the NAP process

8 countries with increased capacity to develop adaptation plans

4 national organisations with baseline climate change impact data necessary for development of adaptation plans
1C. Number of national/sub-national development and key sectoral plans that explicitly address disaster and/or climate risk management being implemented, disaggregated by those which are gender responsive 1 beneficiary country has submitted a NAMA to the UNFCCC (Dominica)

At least 3 countries have projects underway to develop NAPs/LEDS/GE Strategy (Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Lucia)
5 countries have country approved NAPs or NAP Road Maps, which explicitly address disaster and climate risk resilience and gender impacts
Outcome 2: Selected mitigation and adaptation technologies transferred and adopted for low emission and climate resilient development in the Caribbean  2A.  Number of schemes which expand and diversify the productive base based on the use of sustainable production technologies (SP1.1.3) Few positive measures exist (water harvesting, micro-dams, water saving incentives) but are limited in reach and need up-scaling

Some countries have incentives and mechanisms to encourage sustainable practices within various sectors.
15 schemes/interventions which expand and diversify the productive base based on the use of sustainable production technologies
10 agricultural sites implementing climate adaptation and sustainable production methods
2B.  Number of people with improved access to water that meets international drinking standards with % female-headed households benefitting from this access 500 people with improved access to water with 40% of female-headed households benefitting from this access
2C. Area of farmland where climate smart agriculture technologies have been adopted (e.g. reduced tillage, permanent crop cover etc.) and/or with adaptive and improved grazing techniques 5 hectares of grazing area with adaptive and improved grazing techniques
5 hectares of farmland where climate smart agriculture technologies have been adopted (e.g. reduced tillage, permanent crop cover etc).
15% increase crop density (plants per hectare) relative to inputs 
2D. Number of communities where sector-specific risk reduction measures  are being implemented disaggregated by urban and rural areas 12 communities implementing risk reduction measures, disaggregated by urban/rural area
2E. Number of people with improved access to energy with % of female-headed households benefitting from improved access to energy (SP1.5.2) 150 people with improved access to energy with 40% of females benefitting from improved access to energy 
Outcome 3: Knowledge networks strengthened in Caribbean to foster South-South and North-South cooperation through sharing of experiences surrounding climate change, natural hazard risk and resilience

 

3A. Number of new partnership mechanisms with exposure to funding for sustainable  management  solutions of natural resources, ecosystem services, chemicals  and waste at national and/or sub-national level (SP1.3.1)

Several formal and informal relationships exist within the region, and opportunities for cooperation originate in many forms, including through regional bodies as well as projects 3 partnership mechanisms agreed
3B. Number of case studies disseminated and available on regional knowledge platforms 10 case studies disseminated and available on regional knowledge platforms
3C. Number of targeted communities with a strengthened understanding and awareness of climate change risks and adaptation measure 8,000 persons across 20 communities with a strengthened understanding and awareness of climate change risks and adaptation measure
3D. Number of persons benefitting from knowledge-sharing and targeted South-South and North-South cooperation 1,000 persons benefitting from knowledge-sharing and targeted South-South and North-South cooperation

 

       

Please also view the Project's Mid-term Evaluation Report. 

Contacts: 
Yoko Ebisawa
Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership - Project Manager
Neisha Manickchand
Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership - Technical Specialist
Donna Gittens
Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership - Technical Specialist
Sherri Frederick
Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership - Monitoring & Evaluation Analyst
Penny Bowen
Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership - Communications Associate
Wilfred Tate
JCCCP National Focal Point - Belize
Claudine Roberts
JCCCP National Focal Point - Dominica
Astrid Lynch
JCCCP National Focal Point - Guyana
Annlyn Mc Phie
JCCCP National Focal Point - Grenada
Eltha Brown
JCCCP National Focal Point - Jamaica
Kurt Prospere
JCCCP National Focal Point - Saint Lucia
Ruthvin Harper
JCCCP National Focal Point - Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Sharon Legiman
JCCCP National Focal Point - Suriname
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre's International Conference on Climate Change for the Caribbean

More than 100 climate scientists, researchers and negotiators from across the Caribbean and the world gathered at the Hilton Hotel in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad from October 9 to 12, 2017, to highlight the region’s climate change adaptation successes at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) International Conference on Climate Change for the Caribbean.

Youth Climate Change Conference 2017

Caribbean and Japanese youth have put forward their recommendations for climate-smart actions for the region following two days of intense dialogue between October 10-11, 2017 at the third staging of the Youth Climate Change Conference at the Jamaica Conference Centre.

National Adaptation Plan Workshop for Latin America and the Caribbean

Representatives from twenty-six countries in the Latin America and Caribbean countries attended the regional workshop on national adaptation plans (NAPs), held in San Jose, Costa Rica, from 4 to 7 September, 2017.

Capacity Development for Media Practitioners

J-CCCP provided climate change training to more than 30 journalists from across the region. The two-day training seminar enabled media practitioners to learn and share best practices on climate change issues including, climate change science, economics and policy as well as the role of media entities in communicating on climate change.

Consultation for the Development of a Transportation NAMA in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

As St. Vincent and the Grenadines pursues the development of a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (NAMA) in the transportation sector, stakeholders gathered to consult on the process.

Presentation of KAP Study Results and Campaign Brainstorming in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Stakeholders, some of whom took part in data collection for the study, gathered to hear the results of a knowledge, attitudes and practices study conducted in St. Vincent and the Grenadines in December, 2016. Participants also assisted with the development of campaign approaches and committed to supporting campaign implementation.

Development of Belize's National Communication Strategy for Climate Change

J-CCCP supported the National Climate Change Office of Belize in the development of a national communications plan for climate change. This support was in the form of a workshop where stakeholders from key sectors across the country fed into the development of the plan. 

Caribbean Climate Change Coordination Seminar

In April 2016, representatives from regional organisations gathered in St. Lucia to map synergies and actions between development partners and the Project relating to NAPs, NAMAs and knowledge management and communications. Organisations in attendance included: CARDI, CARICOM, CEDMA, CCCCC, CYEN, CIMH, CARPHA, and PANOS, among others. For NAP and NAMA development and pilot projects, organisations were asked to identify stages at which each organisation may be able to lend support based on their expertise, the specific nature of the assistance and how additional funding could be leveraged. Participants also contributed to plans under outcome 3, including policy events, study tours and campaigns and noted that the exercise was useful in order to break a trend of working in silos.-NAMA training

Training Seminar on the Development and Implementation of Climate Mitigation Actions

J-CCCP partnered with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Regional Collaboration Centre (UNFCCC RCC), the UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme and local Ministries in the months of June and September to conduct two-day training seminars in Belize, Grenada, Guyana, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Suriname. The seminars were designed to support the development of climate mitigation actions, including Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). Approximately two hundred persons were trained in total. 

National Adaptation Plans Regional Workshop for the Caribbean

Representatives from 10 Caribbean countries, including J-CCCP’s 8 beneficiary countries, met in Grenada’s capital of St. Georges to discuss strategies to prepare for the impact of climate change. Following Grenada’s final consultation on its National Adaptation Plan (NAP), they were able to share lessons from their experience of national adaptation planning, including some key topics such as political buy-in, coordination, integration of the sectoral plan, climate finance with peers through this two-day event.  The NAP Assembly was co-hosted by Grenada’s Ministry of Education, Human Resource Development and the Environment; the UNDP Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership (J-CCCP); and the NAP Global Network.

National Communication Strategy Development Workshop - Belize

J-CCCP supported the National Climate Change Office of Belize in the development of a country-wide communications strategy. This workshop saw Communications Professionals from Belizean Ministries, CBOs, NGOs and the media gather to have inputs into the strategy. The Project will focus its efforts on implementing the initial stage of the strategy with support from other local stakeholders.  

News and Updates: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
February, 2018
 
December, 2017
 
 
November, 2017
 
 
October, 2017
 
 
October, 2017
 
September, 2017
 
September, 2017
 
 
 
July, 2017
 
April, 2017
 
 
 
February, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
November, 2016

June, 2016

UNDP and UNFCCC Initiates Training Seminars for Climate Mitigation Actions in the Caribbean

 

January, 2016

Japan and UNDP kick start US$15 million Caribbean Climate Change Project

 

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Civil Society Engagement: 

 

Building Resilience of Health Systems in Asian Least Developed Countries to Climate Change

Climate change brings with it serious risks to public health, particularly in Asia.  While heat waves are expected to increase morbidity and mortality in vulnerable groups, altered rain patterns and water flows will impact crop production and thus increase malnutrition.  At the same time, changes in air and water temperatures, as well as increased incidence of extreme events, will affect transmission of infections diseases.  Those in low-lying coastal zones and flood plains are particularly at risk. 

The problems are exacerbated in Least Developed Countries (LDCs), where adaptive capacity and economic vulnerability limit adequate preparation for the impacts of climate change on health. 

The Building Resilience of Health Systems in Asian Least Developed Countries to Climate Change project will support Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal and Timor-Leste by:

  • strengthening institutional capacity to integrate climate risks and adaptation into health sector planning
  • improving surveillance and/or early warning systems for effective decision-making
  • enhancing health sector service delivery
  • supporting regional cooperation and knowledge sharing to promote up-scaling and replication of best practices
  • and integrating health into the National Adaptation Plan process

This project will be implemented in partnership with the World Health Organization and is funded by the Least Developed Countries Fund.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Funding Source: 
Project Details: 
In Asia, the least developed countries (LDCs) of Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao, Myanmar, Nepal, and Timor-Leste, have limited technical capacity of health care systems and personnel to effectively integrate climate-related risks into policy, planning, and regulatory frames, and into interventions to control the burden of climate-sensitive health outcomes. 
 
Existing climate early warning systems managed by national meteorological organizations lack systematic coverage of observational data from regions and areas of the countries with high risks of climate-sensitive health outcomes. 
 
Climate information services are not adequately tailored to the needs of public health professionals.  
 
Primary health care facilities are ill-equipped to prepare for and respond to extreme weather and climate events, lacking information and cost-effective methods and technologies to provide adequate water and sanitiation services during extreme events. 
 
Recognizing these challenges, the National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) of the above-mentioned countries prioritize adaptation to the health risks of climate variability and change. 
 
Designed in consultation with stakeholders, this project will increase the adaptive capacity of national health systems and institutions, and sub-level actors, to respond to and manage long-term climate-sensitive health risks, through the following complementary outcomes: 
 
• Outcome 1: Institutional capacities are strengthened to effectively integrate climate risks and adaptation options in health sector planning and implementation 
• Outcome 2: Effective decision-making for health interventions is enabled through generation of information and improved surveillance and/or early warning systems
• Outcome 3: Climate resilience is enhanced in health service delivery
• Outcome 4.1: Enhanced regional cooperation and knowledge exchange for promoting scale-up and replication of interventions 
• Outcome 4.2: HNAP are effectively integrated into ongoing NAP processes 
 
The regional approach of the project will ensure partnerships across countries are developed and the regional-level systematization of lessons and best practices are documented and assessed to develop technical guidelines, manuals and tool-kits – thereby ensuring that these can be replicated and scaled-up across the region. 
 
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
The objective of this project is to increase the adaptive capacity of national health systems and institutions, and sub-national level actors, to respond to and manage long-term climate-sensitive health risks in six Asian Least Developed Countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal and Timor-Leste).
 
This will be achieved through interventions and policy-level actions, under five outcomes. The project will be overseen by UNDP with project components implemented by the World Health Organization and UNDP, in cooperation with Ministries of Health.
 
Outcome 1: Institutional capacities are strengthened to effectively integrate climate risks and adaptation options in health sector planning and implementation
 
• 1.1 Integrated health national adaptation plan (H-NAP) is designed/updated to achieve the national health adaptation goals
• 1.2 Standard operating procedures developed for managing climate-sensitive health outcomes
• 1.3 Capacity building to support the implementation of standard operating procedures
 
Outcome 2: Effective decision-making for health interventions is enabled through generation of information and improved surveillance and/or early warning systems   
 
• Output 2.1 Vulnerability assessment conducted for future health burdens considering development and climate change 
• Output 2.2 Integrated surveillance system strengthened of climate-sensitive health outcomes
• Output 2.3 Early warning system and response strengthened 
 
Outcome 3: Climate resilience is enhanced in health service delivery 
 
• Output 3.1 Health care infrastructure strengthened to the impacts of climate change
• Output 3.2 Capacity of health personnel improved to identify and treat to climate-sensitive health issues 
• Output 3.3 Climate-sensitive disease control/water programmes strengthened
 
Outcome 4.1: Enhanced regional cooperation and knowledge exchange for promoting scale-up and replication of interventions
 
• Activity 4.1.1 Regional experiences synthesized and shared among countries in the region and across different regions;
• Activity 4.1.2 Definition of normative aspects related to climate-resilient health systems by developing regional-level guidelines, manuals, and other relevant technical documents (e.g. climate-resilient health care facilities (CR-HCFs) and climate resilient Water Safety Plans (CR-WSPs), as required by countries;
• Activity 4.1.3 Regional capacity-building events for different topics (on policy, science and implementation of interventions) and conferences;
• Activity 4.1.4 Systematization of regional experiences and promotion of North-South and South-South cooperation and knowledge exchange (which may include virtual communities of practice and platforms)
 
Outcome 4.2: Health National Adaptation Processes are effectively integrated into ongoing National Adaptation Plan processes
 
• Activity 4.2.1 Training and technical support for Ministries of Health to conduct economic analyses to inform integration of health into adaptation planning and budgeting.
• Activity 4.2.2 Training and tech support for designing/developing bankable projects to secure public or other finance
 
Monitoring & Evaluation: 
The project will be monitored through the following M&E activities:
 
Project start
 
A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first two months of project start after the project document has been signed by all relevant parties.
 
The inception Workshop addresses a number of key issues including:
• Re-orienting project stakeholders to the project strategy and discussing any changes in the overall context that influence project strategy and implementation;
• Discussing the roles and responsibilities of the project team, including reporting and communication lines and conflict resolution mechanisms; 
• Reviewing the project results framework and finalizing the indicators, means of verification and monitoring plan; 
• Discussing reporting, monitoring and evaluation roles and finalizing the M&E budget; identifying national/regional institutes to be involved in project-level M&E; discussing the role of the GEF OFP in M&E;
• Updating and reviewing responsibilities for monitoring the various project plans and strategies, including the risk log; knowledge management strategy, and other relevant strategies;
• Reviewing financial reporting procedures and mandatory requirements, and agreeing on the arrangements for audits 
• Planing and scheduling Project Board meeting and finalizing first year annual work plan
 
An Inception Workshop report is a key reference document and must be prepared and shared with participants to formalize various agreements and plans decided during the meeting. 
 
Quarterly reports
 
Project Progress Reports (PPR) quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. The risk log will be regularly updated.
 
Annually reports
 
An annual Project Implementation Report (PIR) will prepared to monitor progress made since project start, and in particular for the previous reporting period (July to June). The PIR submitted to the GEF will be shared with the Project Board. UNDP-GEF and WHO will coordinate the input of the GEF OFP and other stakeholders to the PIR as appropriate.  The quality rating of the previous year’s PIR will be used to inform the preparation of subsequent PIR. Portfolio level indicators (i.e. GEF focal area tracking tools) are used by most focal areas on an annual basis as well. 
 
Periodic Monitoring through site visits will be conducted, based on the agreed schedule in the Project Inception Report and Annual Work Plan to assess first-hand project progress. A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared and circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.
 
Mid-term evaluation of project cycle
 
An independent Mid-Term Evaluation of the project will be conducted after completion of the first two years. The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  
 
End of project evaluation
 
An independent terminal evaluation (TE) will take place upon completion of all major project ouputs and activities.  The terminal evaluation process will begin three months before operational closure of the project allowing the evaluation mission to proceed while the project team to reach conclusions on key aspects such as project sustainability.  The project manager will remain on contract until the TE report and management response have been finalized.  The terms of reference, the evaluation process and the final TE report will follow the standard templates and guidance prepared by UNDP IEO for GEF-financed projects available at the UNDP Evaluation Resource Center.  As noted in this guidance, the evaluation will be “independent, impartial and rigorous”.  The consultants that will be hired to undertake the assignment will be independent from organizations involved in designing, executing or advising on the project to be evaluated.  The GEF Operational Focal Point and other stakeholders will be involved and consulted during the terminal evaluation process.  Additional quality assurance support is available from the UNDP-GEF Directorate.  The final TE report will be cleared by the UNDP-GEF Regional Technical Advisor, and will be approved by the Project Board.  The TE report will be publicly available in English and the corresponding management response to the UNDP Evaluation Resource Centre (ERC).  Once uploaded to the ERC, the UNDP IEO will undertake a quality assessment and validate the findings and ratings in the TE report, and rate the quality of the TE report.  The UNDP IEO assessment report will be sent to the GEF IEO along with the project terminal evaluation report.   
 
Project Terminal Report
 
The project’s terminal PIR along with the terminal evaluation (TE) report and corresponding management response will serve as the final project report package.  The final project report package shall be discussed with the Project Board during an end-of-project review meeting to discuss lessons learned and opportunities for scaling up.
 
Learning and knowledge sharing
 
Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project.  The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects and disseminate these lessons widely.  There will be continuous information exchange between this project and other projects of similar focus in the same countries, region and globally.
 
A detailed plan for disseminating results will be developed within the first 2 months of project implementation, in consultation with relevant parties including the project management unit of UNDP’s Adaptation Learning Mechanism.
 
There will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. This will be supported by knowledge management activities in Outcome 4.1, including the development and sharing of case studies, national and regional seminars/workshops and exchange visits, and information exchange via a project website and national/regional level workshops. 
 
Auditing
 
The project will be audited according to UNDP Financial Regulations and Rules and applicable audit policies for agency-implemented projects.
 
Contacts: 
UNDP
Ms. Mariana Simoes
Regional Technical Advisor, Climate Adaptation
Ms. Mari Tomova
Regional Technical Advisor, Climate Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

The objective of this project is to increase the adaptive capacity of national health systems and institutions, and sub-national level actors, to respond to and manage long-term climate-sensitive health risks in six Asian Least Developed Countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal and Timor-Leste).

Project Dates: 
2018 to 2022

Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA)

Climate stresses and low adaptive capacity are increasing Africa´s vulnerability to climate change. Climate related shocks to the economy, vulnerable populations, ecosystems and infrastructure threaten development goals and poverty alleviation strategies. The ability of decision-makers to understand and communicate the likely impacts of climate change is of critical importance in adapting development plans to new climate realities. However, the lack of access to reliable climate information and the lack of capacity of disseminating it prove to be significant obstacles in allowing governments and populations to develop the correct tools to address the changes that will be brought on as a result of climate change.

The Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) will enable vulnerable countries in Africa (Benin, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia) to strengthen national climate information systems as well as to benefit from regional coordination and draw upon a platform of knowledge management.

The CIRDA Programme will coordinate among different stakeholders needs and capacities in collecting, generating, analysing and disseminating relevant climate information. It will also provide capacity building on: meteorological, climate and hydrological observing and forecasting systems, disaster risk management and viable communication systems/processes for disseminating alerts, and the use of alternative cost-effective technologies. The Programme will provide special consideration on reaching end user populations such as farmers as well as strategies to engage with the private sector as a service provider and as an end user of climate information.

The multi-country programme is being implemented by UNDP with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Country Fund (LDCF) and is an example of the concrete actions that the UN is taking to reduce the impacts of climate change in all development sectors.

CIRDA Blog

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Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (38.320312491284 10.328754533132)
Funding Source: 

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation: Prevent Natural Disasters in Benin

Presentation
Board Meeting Reports
Programme Related Events
Reports and Publications of relevance to Country Teams
Communications Products
Knowledge Products
Training & Tools
Reports and Publications by country teams
Newsletter
Brochures, Posters, Communications Products
News article
Planning Meeting Presentations
Project Brief / Fact Sheet
Nairobi Round Table on Strengthening Development of Climate Information and Early Warning Systems
ProDocs
Launch Workshop CIRDA
Project Details: 

The Multi-Country Programme will support the following countries in Africa use climate information as a key tool in long term planning fundamental for economic development.

The Programme will strengthen the capacity of these countries and the region to develop and operate modern climate information and early warning systems by making available technical assistance and provide access to new technologies. Countries will also benefit from regional coordination and a knowledge sharing platform.

For up to date information on the CIRDA Programme and to engage in our ongoing discussions, make sure to check out our blog: http://undp-cirda.blogspot.com/

For a brief snapshot of the Programme, download the CIRDA Fact Sheet.

Bonizella Biagini

Dr. Bonizella (Boni) Biagini currently manages the UNDP’s Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA).

Prior to joining UNDP in 2014, Dr. Biagini worked at the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for 12 years, leading the creation and development of the GEF Adaptation program and project portfolio. She was the senior official responsible for mobilizing resources for the first two dedicated adaptation funds: the Least Developed Country Fund (LDCF) and the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF), which together have received donor support of $1.5 billion.  Before joining the GEF, Dr. Biagini worked at several NGOs including the Climate, Energy and Pollution Program at the World Resources Institute and the international office of Legambiente, a leading Italian environmental research organization.

A physicist by training, Dr. Biagini has worked on climate change and other global environmental issues for 25 years in Europe, the United States, Africa, Asia, and several small island states. In addition to her technical skills, her background encompasses an unusual combination of operational experience on the ground and high-level participation in international environmental meetings including the Earth Summit and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Learn more about Dr. Biagini's work with the GEF Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) and the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) in the May 2016 publication "Time to Adapt: Insights from the GEF's Experience in Adaptation to Climate Change." Dr. Biagini is also a contributor to the IPCC Third and Fourth Assessment Reports on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, and the author of numerous publications on climate change science and policy, including the report “Confronting Climate Change, Economic Priorities and Climate Protection in Developing Nations.” (Biagini, 2000).  She is the lead author of three recent articles documenting experiences resulting from climate change adaptation projects:  “Engaging the Private Sector in Adaptation to Climate Change in Developing Countries” (Biagini, Miller, 2013), “A Typology of Adaptation Actions: A Global Look at Climate Adaptation Actions Financed Through the Global Environment Facility” (Biagini, Bierbaum, Stults, Dobardzic, McNeeley, 2014); and “Technology Transfer for Adaptation” (Biagini, Kuhl, Sims Gallagher, Ortiz, 2014). (Photo Courtesy Margherita Mirabella)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Climate Data Digitization

Overview
At the request of the governments of The Gambia, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, the UNDP Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) is taking steps to assist in the preservation of historic climate data in these six African Least Developed Countries.

In its initial phase of support, two experts were commissioned by the CIRDA Programme to meet with National Hydro-Meteorological Services (NHMS) to provide guidance on digitization efforts and create a plan to capture digital records, particularly data used to manage climate impacts on agriculture, fishing and floods. With new training support, three countries are now scaling up efforts to capture historic records and digitize tens of thousands of pages of historic climate archives.

Types of Climate Data
Climate data generally falls into two categories: historical data and data from recent and current observations.

While most people understand the importance of current and recent climate data, fewer appreciate the equal importance of historical climate data. Historical data allow one to establish long-term trends, which in turn helps us understand and better plan for future changes in climate. They also help in developing and refining climate models and seasonal forecasts, as well as provide the foundational datasets used for adaptation studies at local, national and regional scales.

Climate models are mathematical representations of the interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, ice and the sun. Once a climate model is developed, it has to be tested to find out if it works. And since we can’t wait for 30 years to see if a model is any good or not, the models have to be tested against the past in a process that is called “hindcasting” that rely on historical observations. The simple assumption of hindcasting is that if a model can correctly predict current trends from a starting point somewhere in the past, one can expect it to predict what might happen in the future.

History of Climate Data
Meteorological data observations in most African countries date back to the early 19th Century (for example, in Tanzania the first meteorological observation was made along the coast in 1850). Once recorded on paper, the observations are kept in various formats in data archives usually located at meteorological agency headquarters or even still at the stations where the measurements were originally taken. But this historical data is recorded largely on paper and, depending on the age of the paper and the condition of the archives, some of the data is unreadable or is wearing out at dramatic rates, due to handwritten ink that fades over time. 

Initial Needs Assessment
During an initial needs assessment, only Malawi reported having partial access to digitized historic data, with other countries often reporting no central digital archive of these data existing. One reason for this is that historic climate data sets are often held by other agencies aside from the NHMS. Alternative agencies holding historic data sets often include the Ministries of Agriculture, Water, Transport and Education.

Why Digitization is Important
Climate data is an essential ingredient needed to develop weather/climate-based early warning systems and a cornerstone for resilience building efforts. It not only allows us to monitor adverse impacts across development sectors, populations and ecosystems, but it also helps countries to prepare for and adapt to the realities of climate change. This information can be analyzed and applied to protect development gains and aid in the achievement of National Adaptation Plan goals. It is also an essential ingredient in creating more accurate forecasts that can be used to track storms, protect lives and build more resilient livelihoods. Unfortunately, in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, these important data – often recorded with pen and paper – is being lost at a remarkable rate. Civil War, material decay and the sands of time are literally erasing the historical record of climate in the region.

The Strategy
National digitization strategies depend on a number of factors, including where and how data is stored, legal frameworks, in-house capacity, budgets, and equipment. Generally speaking, and often utilizing external funding, governments electronically capture paper records into a database with the first step being to record digital images of the data using a scanner or digital camera. This ensures that a digital copy of the record is preserved and can be be shared. However, the data itself is not yet in a digital form where it can be used to make calculations or for computational analyses. This requires either manually keying the records into a digital database, using software such as ClimSoft or Excel, or using automatic character recognition software to read, analyze and warehouse the new digital archive. Each variable and data set is important for improved weather forecasting and historical climate tracking, with different variables being used in different applications e.g. wind speed, humidity, temperature and incident radiation all important to calculate evaporation which is used model hydrological flows and crop development. An example of some of the main data useful for climate applications are given below:

Top Level Data Sets

  • Rainfall
  • Temperatures
  • Wind speed and direction
  • Humidity
  • Sunshine duration
  • Incident solar radiation
  • River Discharge
  • Salinity
  • Surface Water levels

Resources and Further Reading

Images

From top to botton: Historic records in The Gambia, where the archive is not in a good state, but recent records are intact; handheld data recue efforts in Uganda; and the Tanzania Meteorological Department's historic archive.

Programme Outputs

UNDP's CIRDA Programme provides support to 11 vulnerable countries African countries in their efforts to enhance their capacity to collect, analyze and disseminate climate information as a tool in adaptation planning. It does so by providing expert technical advice, promoting regional cooperation efforts, and capacity building.The support provided by the CIRDA Programme is in addition to each countries efforts to implement individual national climate information/early warning projects.

Click below to learn about some recent on the ground achievements:

Uganda

Zambia

Benin

Sao Tome and Principe

Tanzania

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Implementation of the CIRDA Programme is carried out under the general guidance of a Project Board composed of senior-level representatives from UNDP-GEF, WMO, UN-SPIDER, and representatives from 3 UNDP Country Offices.

The Project Board is the strategic decision-making body of the project, providing overall guidance and direction to the CIRDA Programme Manager.

III Board Meeting- 2016/17

A CIRDA Project Board Meeting was held in 16 February, 2017. The meeting presented the 2017 AWP as well as the Programme's milestones for 2016.

Click here for Board Meeting Minutes

Click here for Board Meeting Presentation

Click here for UNDP CIRDA 2016 Milestones

II Board Meeting- 2015

A CIRDA Project Board Meeting was held in Kampala, Uganda on March 5, 2015. The meeting was held to present the Programme's 2015 Annual Work Plan and Budget, both were approved by all board members.

Click here for Board Meeting Minutes

Click here for the Board Meeting Presentation

I Board Meeting- 2014

The first Project Board Meeting was held on July 8, 2014. The meeting's objective was the presentation of CIRDA's Annual Work Plan and Budget, both which were unanimously approved.

Click Here for the Board Meeting Minutes

Click Here for the Board Meeting Presentation

Contacts: 
UNDP-GEF
Bonizella Biagini
Programme Manager
UNDP-GEF
Montserrat Xilotl
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

'Towards Sustainability of Climate Information Services' 

Achievements, Impacts, Lessons Learned and Next Steps for Climate Information Projects

29 November- 1 December, 2017, Lusaka Zambia

Information is power. With improved weather and climate information, nations are able to make climate-smart decisions on everything from agriculture to energy to natural resource conservation while vulnerable communities are be able to protect themselves when bad and unpredictable weather hits. With this in in mind, UNDP been collaborating with countries in strengthening their capacities to collect reliable climate information and to communicate effectively to enhance community and economic resilience to a changing climate. The UNDP Multi Country Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) has been working with 11 African countries for 5 years in meeting this objective by deploying world-leading experts on hydrology, new technologies, meteorology and public-private partnerships and helping national meteorological services establish the networks, partnerships and capacities needed provide climate information in a manner that meets the needs of vulnerable communites and main economic sectors.  

This past November, UNDP and the Govenment of Zambia held a regional workshop with representatives from Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Liberia, Malawi, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda aa as they begin to develop their plans to ensure long-term sustainability of the investments made in the in the framework of national GEF- LDCF funded projects aimed at strengthening national climate information and early warning systems (SCI/EWS). The workshop focused on the achievements made by each country project including the establishment of national standard operating procedures for early warnings, data rescue of important historical data, expansion of observation networks, enhanced national capacities in forecasting and administrating data and in some cases consolidating weather and climate data and making it available online to help users better assess climate risks. Through discussing achievements and lessons learned, the workshop was able to work with countries to address common concerns and issues as projects move forward with national resources and efforts. 

The workshop provided examples of regional and national African networks that have achived a sound level of sustainability  such as ASECNA and the Nigerian Meteorological Service (NIMET) and projects that have looked to innovative methods to disseminate climate information for decision making such as PICSA. Participation from the African Development Bank, the World Bank,and UNDP also provided discussion on lessons learned through its various portfolio of projects including a new approach that needs to be taken that goes beyond just investing in equipment but moving towards providing climate information services that are economically sustainable, country appropriate and in turn generate true resilience to climate change. 

Agenda

Workshop Presentations

  1. UNDP CIRDA Programme - Bonizella Biagini
  2. Liberia SCI/EWS Project Update
  3. Zambia SCI/EWS Project Update
  4. Sierra Leone SCI/EWS Project Update
  5. Malawi SCI/EWS Project Update
  6. Introduction to Data Rescue Efforts- Mark Tadross
  7. IEDRO: Historical Climate Data Rescue and Digitization Efforts in Africa- Martin Mukhondia
  8. ZMD: Climate Data Rescue in Zambia- Martin Swasa
  9. Uganda SCI/EWS Project Update
  10. Ethiopia SCI/EWS Project Update
  11. Tanzania SCI/EWS Project Update
  12. PICSA- Graham Clarkson
  13. Kukua- Penelope Cabot
  14. Sao Tome and Principe SCI/EWS Project Update
  15. Benin SCI/EWS Project Update
  16. Burkina Faso SCI/EWS Project Update
  17. ASECNA- Mahfoudh Moctar
  18. NIMET- Sani Abubakar Mashi
  19. They Hydro in Hydromet- Joost Hoedjes
  20. Long Term Agreement with BRL for hydro-modeling- Marie Christine Germain
  21. Lessons Learned African Development Bank- Justus Kabyerma
  22. Lessons Learned UNDP CIRDA- Bonizella Biagini

Workgroup Activity Results

Group 1: Benin, Burkina Faso, Sao Tome and Principe

Group 2: Malawi, Sierra Leone, Liberia

Group 3: Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia, Zambia

Workshop Minutes

Participant List

 

‘The Last Mile’

Saving lives, improving livelihoods and increasing resiliency with tailored weather information services
for a changing climate

15-17 March, 2016, Livingstone, Zambia

Climate information and early warning systems can save lives, improve livelihoods and build resiliency across Africa. In order to seize this opportunity, timely, accurate and actionable weather and climate information must be delivered from data collection and creation sources across the “Last Mile” to uninformed and vulnerable end-users.

In this innovation-driven multi-country workshop, experts on cutting-edge technology, communications, public-private partnerships, meteorology and sustainable development will come together to explore new pathways to move from the collection of data to its application, with the end goal of creating actionable recommendations that UNDP-supported climate-information programmes can leverage to impact lives and build sustainability. For this to happen, national weather information services should not only have access to modern weather observation technologies and forecast information, but they must also be able to communicate and apply the content derived from these systems to those in need.

Interactive sessions will cover diverse topics beginning with the sharing of best practices on the application of weather data in the field, followed by sessions and panel discussions that explore important topics that will guide our journey toward the “Last Mile.” These include defining roles and responsibilities of public and private information goods, establishing key partnerships required for the design, development and potential commercialization of “Last Mile” products and services, and developing integrated communications strategies. A notable side event, The Climate Action Hackathon, will also take place in parallel to generate ideas for Last Mile products and services from the application development community and local media.

Ample time will be provided for interactive discussion between project managers, implementing agency officials and the Last Mile application development community in order to more deeply explore the development of workshop ideas within each national project.

Main Goals

  • Understand challenges and opportunities for UNDP-supported Climate Information and Early Warning Systems projects as we journey toward the last mile
  • Share best practices, innovative technologies and cutting-edge methodologies
  • Define actionable recommendations to cover the “Last Mile”
  • Build relationships and partnerships
  • Ensure long-term sustainability
  • Embrace innovation
  • Connect, listen, explore

Resources

Presentations - Day 1

Presentations - Day 2

Country Presentations

Mobile APP

Climate Action Hackathon

Big Ideas, Visionaries, Amateur Forecasters and Computer Developers Welcome at UNDP Climate Information for a Resilient Africa Event. Learn More

 

 

25-27 August, 2015, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

UNDP CIRDA Country Project Managers Workshop

This workshop hosted by the UNDP’s Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) brings together country project managers, technical advisories, meteorologists and hydrologists, and experts on public-private partnerships, communications and development to explore innovative approaches and new technologies to strengthen and sustain climate information and early warning systems in Africa.

The meeting offers an opportunity for collaboration and knowledge sharing between in-country leadership teams from 11 African nations. Sessions focus on technical support mission planning, reports from the Strengthening National Climate Information/Early Warning System (CI/EWS) Projects, public-private partnership market studies, support for the procurement of Hydro-Meteorological technology, and covering the “Last Mile.”

Unique country clinics bring country project managers together with experts from the CIRDA Programme to discuss innovative climate and weather information
technologies, new approaches and cutting-edge applications of climate data.

The meeting is hosted at the UNDP Regional Service Center for Africa (RSC). Powerpoint presentations and videos from the event will be shared on this page as they become available.

Links

Presentations

Introductions, Meeting Goals and Strategies

Reports from Strengthening National Climate Information/ Early Warning System (CI/EWS) Projects

Day 1

Day 2

Videos

 


 

 

3 March, 2015, Kampala, Uganda- Workshop on Creating Value Added Weather and Climate Services through Innovative Public Private Partnerships

The UNDP-CIRDA Programme and the Government of Uganda held a training workshop at the Golf Course Hotel in Kampala aimed at building sustainable climate change adaptation and economic development plans. The workshop will support National Hydrological and Meteorological Services (NHMS) in Africa create value added weather and climate services by engaging with the private sector and developing innovative public private partnerships. 

The workshop brought together government representatives, the private sector, international experts, representatives from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and UNDP.  Discussions were held with representatives from agriculture, financial, aviation and telecommunication sectors on how to  meet their needs and best engage them through the use of new technologies to communicate timely and reliable climate information to support national development. 

Long term financial sustainability of national weather and climate services was a key topic  addressed during this two day event.  As governments deal with budget constraints on many fronts, limited budget resources are a challenge for NHMS in their attempts meet the information needs of local populations. Conversations were centered on analyzing the potential for generating revenue to support the sustainability of weather and climate services, including opportunities for collaboration with mobile phone companies and establishing succesful public private partnerships. These discussions led to the development of country action plans to provide a pathway forward in CIRDA's 11 partner countries.

Workshop Agenda

Workshop Logistic Note

Official Press Release

Workshop Minutes

Action Plans

Presentations:

Day 1

Day 2

CIRDA Partner Country Presentations

 

 

14 October, 2014, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- Workshop on a Systems Approach to Designing, Implementing, and Utilizing Observing Networks

UNDP’s Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information and Resilience Development in Africa (CIRDA), in close collaboration with the UNDP Country Office in Tanzania, held a training workshop on a Systems Approach to Designing, Implementing, and Utilizing Observing Networks from 14 to16 October, 2014, at the Hotel White Sands in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

The workshop provided training to Directors of the National Meteorology and Hydrology Services (NHMS), Directors of the NHMS Observation Networks, CIRDA country managers, and other interested CIRDA partners, by introducing a systems approach to the design, implementation, and utilization of observing networks. Training sessions were led by international professionals in the fields of meteorology, surface observations, data quality, private sector engagement, and climate technologies. The event also provided an opportunity for country representatves to present their progress on implementing local and national early warning systems (EWS) with the support of the Programme. The workshop discussion resulted in the development of country posters that detailed national observing networks.

Click here for the agenda workshop

Workshop Participants

Links to Presentations:

Click here to see a video on the EWS in Benin and its success in alerting local populations on hazardous floodings.

Click here for a fact sheet on Sao Tome and Principe's EWS

Country posters detailing national observing networks

 

 

20 May, 2014, Nairobi, Kenya- Roundtable on Strengthening Development of Weather, Climate and Hydrology related Early Warning Systems in Africa

Development banks, intergovernmental agencies and meteorological services working in Africa to support the development of climate information and early warning systems across Africa met in Nairobi to communicate and raise awareness of ongoing and planned iniatives.  This event is an example of the ongoing  coordination between programmes and agencies to assure that all iniatives are in keeping with development and adaptation needs. Discussions served to highlight the complementary nature of regional activities directed at enhancing climate information systems. 

CIRDA Programme Manager, Bonizella Biagini, presented the aims, objectives, actions and scope of the CIRDA Programme.

Click here for presentation.

Presentations were also made by representatives from UNESCO, WMO, AFDB, Kenya's Metorological Service, ICPAC, NDMA, UNEP and the UN's International System for Disaster Reduction.

For a full summary of the event, click here.

 

 

13 April, 2014, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia- Launch of the Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information Systems in Africa

Representatives from UNDP's GEF Unit met in Ethiopia on April 13-14 with high level representatives from Benin, Liberia, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Sao Tome and Principe, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia to launch the Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information Systems in Africa. The Honorable Ministers of Environment from Uganda, Sao Tome and Principe as well as the Executive Chairperson of the Environment Protection Agency of Sierra Leone were present to celebrate the Programme's onset.

As a highlight to the workshop, an Expo with 13 meteorological companies and service providers was held to introduce government representatives to the cutting edge technologies available in the collection, processing and dissemination of climate information.

Agenda

Links to Presentations

Workshop Participants

 

Map Caption: 

The CIRDA Programme is based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and provides technical support and expertise to Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems Projects in 11 African least developed countries.

 

 

News and Updates: 

CIRDA Blog

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Video Playlist

Livefeed - Climate Action Hackathon - Leveraging Weather and Climate Data to Create Solutions for Adaptation

May 24, 2016, 18:30 (CEST) Bonn, Germany | Post questions on Twitter @unfccc_ccstudio
With obsolete or malfunctioning technologies, dozens of local languages, high-levels of illiteracy, and limited electricity and access to media, many vulnerable communities in Africa do not receive reliable weather reports, and only a few nations possess the ability to issue early warning messages and reach the “last mile.” In response to this challenge, this past March in Zambia the UNDP’s CIRDA Programme launched a Climate Action Hackathon. The event engaged young African developers to create innovative software focused on communicating directly with end users. The livestream of the side event at the May Bonn Climate Change Conference will present a practical demonstration of the innovative solutions that were developed by the hackers to provide weather information for specific end users, including farmers, vulnerable communities and policymakers to inform adaptation actions. The side event will also introduce the results of a Market Study on revenue generating opportunities for weather services in Africa.

CIRDA and CI/EWS Projects In The News

Tanzania: Free Mobile Phones to Boost Awareness On Climate, Weather
All Africa
Wednesday 19 April 2017

The government has embarked on issuance of free mobile phones to local farmers to facilitate direct channeling of information on climate, weather and related disasters to peasants for increased awareness. The initiative has been hatched under the 'Strengthen Climate Information and early Warning System,' the programme that the Disaster Management Department in the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) is executing. Read more

 

New GEF Least Developed Countries Fund Project Supported by UNDP to Detect Lightning in Uganda
Uganda Oberserver
20 May 2016
...The Uganda National Meteorological Authority (UNMA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have joined hands to strengthen climate information and early-warning systems [in Uganda]. Their initiative would, among other things, detect lightning and inform people to move away from known lighting hotspots... Read More

 

Procurement Assistance

As part of the CIRDA Programme’s objective to enhance national capacities in monitoring and forecasting extreme weather, hydrology and climate change, UNDP-GEF and UNDP's Procurement Support Office (PSO) have established a collaboration framework under the CIRDA Programme to support  partner countries in the procurement of weather, climate and hydrological monitoring infrastructure and new technologies.

Procurement support includes: a) reviewing technical specifications and Terms of Refrence (ToRs) developed by requisitioning units & projects; b) feedback and recommendations pertaining the suitability of technical specifications/requirements to conduct procurement processes; c) market research and sourcing activities to ensure awareness and interest of relevant supplier base; d) review of procurement documents submitted by requisitioning units/projects; e) assistance to Country Offices (COs) & projects with procurement related clarifications during tender processes; f) reviewing submissions to contract review committees and provide recommendations to COs and projects; g) assistance and backstopping support to ensure satisfactory completion of vendor’s contractual obligations and; h) developing managing and maintaining, suitable procurement tools, systems, mechanisms, agreements and contracts to ensure reliable on-going supply chain mechanisms.

In collaboration with CIRDA experts on alternative technologies, the PSO Unit has developed a fact sheet to serve as a support guide to partner countries in their efforts to procure new technologies.

The PSO Unit has also created an online platform with various resources to help country offices and partners. This information is available at the following websites:

UNDP-GEF Procurement Tools & Knowledge Sharing

Long Term Agreements (LTAs) and their corresponding Standard Operation Procedures (SOP)

For any questions please feel free to contact Mettelena Herring at mettelena.herring@undp.org

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Climate Change Adaptation in the Delta State of Nigeria (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

In December 2009, Delta State of the Federal Republic of Nigeria signed a Memorandum of Understanding on TACC with UNDP as part of its efforts to tackle environmental devastation arising from climate change. Being an oil and gas producing state, Delta State is well positioned to seize opportunities from climate change mitigation actions. At the same time, being a coastal state, Delta State is particularly vulnerable to sea water rise and therefore has to develop a strategy to analyze the present and future vulnerability of the state.

The design of the Delta TACC has taken the unique situation of the state as an oil production state into account and the needs and overall objectives of the State Government. Delta State expects that the partnership with UN through TACC and other programmes and organisationswill assist the state government in developing capacity to assess the level of environmental damage caused by oil pollution and rising sea level. Delta State considers the Delta TACC as a strategic initiative that can assist the government in carrying out an environmental diagnosis, which reviews the state of the environment, including the impacts of oil and gas production activities and land use on ecosystems.

The TACC Nigeria project will support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming in developing countries by:

  • Establishing partnership, coordination and participation platform for climate change planning and programming;
  • Building capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions;
  • Formulating an Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP);
  • Formulating a climate change policy and investment package, i.e., a portfolio of CC adaptation and mitigation policy and investment projects to be implemented by combining and sequencing different financial opportunities; and
  • Producing and disseminating lessons learned & best practices within and beyond Nigeria.

Click here for more information on the Overall TACC Project.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (5.77880859375 6.00945316308)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
Project Details: 

 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The overall objective of the project, namely supporting low-carbon and climate change-resilient local development in Nigeria, will be achieved by supporting local decision-makers and planners to design integrated climate change (adaptation and mitigation) policies, strategies and formulate concrete actions and investment plans that promote long-term sustainability and poverty reduction in the context of local / regional development.

  • Output 1. Partnership, coordination and participation platforms for climate change planning and programming established
  • Output 2. Capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions built
  • Output 3. Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP) formulated
  • Output 4. Climate change policy and investment package developed
  • Output 5. Lessons learned and best practices disseminated
Contacts: 
UNDP
Benoit Lebot
UNDP Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 
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An Integrated Water Resource Management Programme in the Maldives

The objective of this project is to ensure reliable and safe freshwater supply for Maldivian communities in a changing climate. As surface freshwater is generally lacking throughout the country, the key problems pertaining to freshwater security relate to the management of increasingly variable rainwater resources and increasingly saline and polluted groundwater. In order to reduce the aforementioned barriers to effective climate change adaptation in the water management sector, it is essential to reinforce the perspective of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) on inhabited islands. 

This will ensure that measures responding to additional, climate change-related risks (such as greater rainfall variability, unreliable recharge of aquifers, longer dry periods, and increasing damage to infrastructure from extreme weather events) are addressed in concert with a response to basic development problems (such as insufficient sewage and wastewater treatment, lack of environmental awareness, lack of water conservation, and lack of comprehensive stakeholder participation in the design and monitoring of water management schemes).

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
LINESTRING (71.54296875 4.12727313784, 74.5971679688 4.21493095735, 74.3774414063 -1.75754902265, 71.71875 -1.66969771289, 71.6528320313 4.14918850803)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the islands of: Mahibadhoo (Alifu Dhaalu Atoll), Ihavandhoo (Haa Alifu Atoll) and Gadhdhoo (Gaaf Dhaal Atoll).
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$8,989,225 (requested and funded)
Co-Financing Total: 
$1,800,000
Project Details: 

Groundwater and freshwater are scarce resources in Maldives, due to the hydrogeology of the country. The freshwater aquifer lying beneath the islands is a shallow lens, 1 to 1.5m below the surface, and no more than a few meters thick. A critical determinant of availability is net rainfall recharge, which is becoming more variable in a changing climate. Over the last few years the National Disaster Management Center has transported potable water to many islands facing acute water shortages due to prolonged dry periods, costing over US$ 2 million every year.

Many freshwater aquifers are already stressed from over-extraction and face the risk of total depletion. This already precarious hydrological system is further aggravated by climate change-induced effects of sea level rise and flooding during extreme weather events, which increases saltwater intrusion into the freshwater lens. Salinization of groundwater is affecting the quality of life in the islands, as people depend on groundwater for washing, bathing and other non-potable uses. In addition, groundwater is stressed from the effects of flood- induced pollution, especially spillovers of septic tanks and spillage of human, animal and household waste during periods of heavy rainfall and inundation.

This initiative will increase the resilience of freshwater resources through an integrated management of ground- and freshwater resources in the islands of Mahibadhoo (Alifu Dhaalu Atoll), Ihavandhoo (Haa Alifu Atoll) and Gadhdhoo (Gaaf Dhaal Atoll). These three islands represent different geographical locations across the country, are densely populated and have a flat topography varying between 0-0.5 meters above sea level (MSL).

In order to reduce the barriers to effective climate change adaptation in the water management sector, it is essential to reinforce the perspective of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) on inhabited islands. This will ensure that measures responding to additional, climate change-related risks (such as greater rainfall variability, unreliable recharge of aquifers, longer dry periods, and increasing damage to infrastructure from extreme weather events) are addressed in concert with a response to basic development problems (such as insufficient sewage and wastewater treatment, lack of environmental awareness, lack of water conservation, and lack of comprehensive stakeholder participation in the design and monitoring of water management schemes).

Through the rollout of an integrated water resource management programme in HA. Ihavandhoo, ADh. Mahibadhoo and GDh. Gadhdhoo, this project will ensure consistent, safe and equitable access of all island communities to safe freshwater in a changing climate. Through a targeted mix of investments, the project will address the effects of variable rainfall, extreme weather events, salinization and pollution of aquifers.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1: Establishment of integrated, climate-resilient water supply and management systems

Establish artificial groundwater recharge systems (Output 1.1) and improve rainwater harvesting schemes (Output 1.2). Establish production and distribution system for desalinated water supply (Output 1.3) and improve existing wastewater management systems (Output 1.4).

Component 2: Increase participation in the development, allocation and monitoring of freshwater use in a changing climate

Community consultations (Output 2.1) and targeted training events (Output 2.2) on each island to strengthen local awareness and ownership of integrated, climate-resilient freshwater management.

Component 3: Replication and upscaling of climate-resilient freshwater management

Train technicians (Output 3.1) and create institutional mechanisms (Output 3.2) to integrate of adaptation into water management projects through an Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) framework. Develop and finance action plans on at least 4 additional islands to replicate integrated, climate-resilient freshwater management (Output 3.3).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project monitoring and evaluation (M&E) will be in accordance with established UNDP procedures and will carried out by the Project team, verified by the MHE and the UNDP Country Office in Male. Dedicated support by the technical adaptation teams in the UNDP Asia-Pacific Regional Center and UNDP New York will be provided on a regular basis. A comprehensive Results Framework of the project will define success indicators for project implementation as well as the respective means of verification. A Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) system for the project will be established, based on these indicators and means of verification. It is important to note that the Results Framework in Annex B, together with Output indicators, targets and means of verification, will be reconfirmed during the inception phase of the project. Any changes to the Results Framework require approval by the Project Board.

A Project Inception Workshop will be conducted within four months of project start up with the full project team, relevant government counterparts, co-financing partners, and UNDP. The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. A fundamental objective of the Inception Workshop will be to present the modalities of project implementation and execution, document mutual agreement for the proposed executive arrangements amongst stakeholders, and assist the project team to understand and take ownership of the project‟s goals and objectives. Another key objective of the Inception Workshop is to introduce the project team which will support the project during its implementation. An Inception Workshop Report will be prepared and shared with participants to formalize various agreements decided during the meeting.

A UNDP risk log will be regularly updated in intervals of no less than every six months in which critical risks to the project have been identified. Quarterly Progress Reports will be prepared by the Project team and verified by the Project Board. Annual Project Reports will be prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period. These annual reports include, but are not limited to, reporting on the following:

  • Progress made toward project objective and project outcomes - each with indicators, baseline data and end-of-project targets (cumulative);
  • Project outputs delivered per project Outcome (annual);
  • Lessons learned/good practices;
  • Annual expenditure reports;
  • Reporting on project risk management.

Government authorities, members of the Project Board and UNDP staff will conduct regular field visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.

In terms of financial monitoring, the project team will provide UNDP with certified periodic financial statements. Audits on the project will follow UNDP finance regulations and rules and applicable audit policies. During project implementation, Annual Work Plans (AWPs) and Quarterly Work Plans (QWPs) will be used to refine project delivery targets and realign project work upon consultation and endorsement by the Project Board.

 

The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation (MTE) at the mid- point of project implementation, which will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and identify course correction if needed. It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management. Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for the final half of the project‟s term. A summative terminal evaluation will be conducted 3 months before project closure.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP - Maldives
Mohamed Inaz
Assistant Representative Representative, Energy and Environment Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
AF
Project Status: 
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