Strengthening Adaptative Capacity and Reducing Vulnerability to Climate Change in Burkina Faso

Introduction

Due to its socio-economic, climatic and geographical reasons, Burkina Faso is particularly vulnerable to climate change. Firstly, it is one of the poorest countries in the world with GDP per capita estimated at US$420 with approximately 72% of the population live on less than $2 per day. Secondly, the West African region is expected to experience amongst the greatest climatic impacts on the Sahel region (i.e. almost all of Burkina Faso) in particular is expected to experience the most challenging climatic changes in terms of temperature, rainfall, storms and extreme events. Thirdly, Burkina Faso's population and economy is largely dependent on primary food production and natural resources. The agriculture and food production sectors are also the sectors the most susceptible to climate change. Hence, large parts of the population and the economy are involved in and dependent on the sectors most vulnerable to climate change.

This project, 'Strengthening Adaptation Capacities and Reducing the Vulnerability to Climate Change in Burkina Faso', recognizes that measures to adapt to climate change must first and foremost be taken at the household and village level. The project therefore takes the community as a key entry point, and as key drivers for change. The project also recognizes that in most parts of rural Burkina Faso the agriculture, livestock and agro-forestry sectors are fully integrated and must be developed as a whole - it is not possible to address either agriculture, or livestock or forestry in isolation. Furthermore, in rural Burkina Faso, the combined agriculture, livestock-raising and agro-forestry sector is by far the most important element in the socio-economy, and there is a large equivalence between community development and development of this sector. Accordingly, it is valid to take community development as an initial entry point for development of the agriculture, livestock-raising and agro-forestry sectors.

Source: Burkina Faso UNDP Project Document (March 17, 2009)

Project Details

In recent years, Burkina Faso has made important steps towards achieving sustainable development, and has initiated important economic and governance reforms. Overall, Burkina Faso has a healthy natural resource base, with fertile soils, water and wood stocks. However, Burkina Faso is still affected by high levels of poverty. It has a relatively undiversified economy with a high dependence on agriculture and food production, and a low integration into regional and global economies. It is highly dependent on the natural resource base - biomass supplies 80% of energy. It also suffers some severe environmental challenges. These factors leave the people and the economy highly vulnerable to climate change.

The participatory and comprehensive process to prepare the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) identified priority and urgent measures to take in response to this challenge. This project addresses four of the twelve measures identified in the NAPA. Interventions will take place at community, regional and national levels, and will address, in an integrated manner, the agriculture, livestock, water and agro-forestry sectors. Specifically, the project is expected to: 

  • Improve capacity to plan for and respond to climate changes in the agro-sylvo-pastoral sector. As a result of this project, the national enabling framework covering agriculture, livestock and forestry in arid rural areas will support adaptation to climate change. Moreover, key stakeholders at provincial and regional will have the capacity and tools to support local stakeholders as they adapt to climate change. They will be supporting local stakeholders throughout arid zones
  • Sustainably and significantly reduced climate induced impacts in a series of villages As a result of this project; stakeholders in six villages will have adapted to climate change, and will have the capacity to continue adapting. Hence economic production will improve, as will the quality of life
  • Collect, manage and disseminate the lessons learnt and best practices, nationally and internationally. Hence a process to replicate results in Burkina Faso will be underway, and lessons will be used regionally and internationally. 

Source: Burkina Faso UNDP Project Document (March 17, 2009)

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Households in rural villages in Burkina Faso
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
Burkina Faso Ministry of Environment
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Global Environment Facility (GEF)
Project Status: 
Under Implementation
Location: 
Rural
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
2,900,000 (As of March 17, 2009)
Co-Financing Total: 
20,095,000 (As of September 2010)

Key Results and Outputs

  • Outcome 1: Capacity to plan for and respond to climate changes in the agro-sylvo-pastoral sector improved
    • Output 1.1: Legislative, policy and planning/programming framework revise to account for adaptation to climate change
    • Output 1.2: Effective consultation and partnership mechanisms leading to field level synergies amongst all projects in this field
    • Output 1.3: In six communies, commun level extension agents have knowledge and tools for integrating climate change into farm level agro-sylvo-pastoral activities
    • Output 1.4: In three provinces, provincial technical officers have the knowledge and tools for integrating climate change into agro-sylvo-pastoral related sectors
    • Output 1.5: Strengthened capacity to collect and manage data and information in order to provide climate forecasts to local areas
    • Output 1.6: The national, regional and provincial food security monitoring and response system has adapted to the risks of climate change
  • Outcome 2: Risk of climate induced impacts on agro-sylvo-pastoral productivity reduced through the understanding, testing and adoption of best practices through community approach
    • Output 2.1: Mounkuy Village, Mouhoun Province
      • Assisting the natural regeneration of 30 hectares per year forestland
      • Developing each year 30 hectares of land for fodder production
      • Installing one large diameter well and 3 water points for livestock
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Organisational strengthening to adapt to climate change. Notably, this includes establishing the water management and river bank protection committee, and a committee to manage bush-fires
      • Construct and develop sustainable operation of a food bank
    • Output 2.2: Souri Village, Mouhoun Province
      • Developing and testing new crop varieties (e.g. of corn, sorghum, sesame, niebe). These will be tested on local farm-experimental plots, of one hectare
      • Developing each year 30 hectares of land for fodder production
      • Improving aviculture facilities and technical capacity, as an alternative livelihood, to increase duck, turkey and chicken production
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Organisational strengthening to adapt to climate change. Notably, this includes establishing the water management and river bank protection committee, and a committee to manage bush-fires;
      • Establish a local credit system linked to the operations of the cereal bank
    • Output 2.3: Safi Village, Namentenga Province
      • Developing family 'African vegetable gardens', based on drip irrigation and introduction of new crops (palm dates, vegetables, jujube) supporting 0.25 hectares per family
      • Intensifying production of Baobab leaves, as a nutritional supplement and as fodder
      • Creating grazing annual set-aside zones (3 hectares/year will be set aside for natural recovery)
      • Installing one large diameter well and 3 water points for livestock
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Organisational strengthening to adapt to climate change. Notably, this includes establishing the water management and river bank protection committee, and a committee to manage bush-fires;
      • Construction and operation of a food bank
    • Output 2.4: Kobouré Village, Namentanga Province
      • Establishing multi-use nursery garden for use by local vulnerable and under-privileged groups. This will aim to provide a supply of seeds and seedlings to the village
      • Renovating fodder production plots
      • Protecting river banks and watering points from sand invasion and degradation
      • Constructing 5 fodder storage units per year
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Organisational strengthening to adapt to climate change. Notably, this includes establishing the water management and river bank protection committee, and a committee to manage bush-fires
      • Constructing and establishing sustainable operation of a food bank
    • Output 2.5: Tin-Akoff Village, Oudalan Province
      • Protecting 100 m of river and pond banks through bush and tree planting and protection
      • Establishing 10 fodder gardens per year, based on Moringa oleifera
      • Establishing a solar powered community centre
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Establish the Beli management committee to oversee planning and adaptation to climate change of the Beli wetland
      • Constructing and establishing sustainable operation of a food bank
    • Output 2.6: Bangawa Village, Oudalan Province
      • Use Vallerani  technology to restore 50 hectares of degraded land
      • Supporting women goat and sheep farmers with credit for stock and inputs – 10 women per year
      • Removing sand and dragging ponds in order to restore ecological functions and economic use
      • Undertaking in-depth training on the practices and measures to adapt agriculture, livestock raising and forestry to climate change adaptation
      • Organisational strengthening to adapt to climate change. Notably, this includes establishing the water management and river bank protection committee, and a committee to manage bush-fires
      • Constructing and establishing sustainable operation of a food bank
  • Outcome 3: Lessons learned and best practices from Outcome 1 and Outcome 2 are collected and disseminated
    • Output 3.1: The pilot viillages regularly exchange information and experience
    • Output 3.2: A tool for lesson learning, collecting and storing all the information emanating from the project(s)
    • Output 3.3: The lessons learnt under the project are systematically shared with local partners and international agencies (including scientific community)

Source: Burkina Faso UNDP Project Document (March 17, 2009)

 

Monitoring and Evaluation

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project's results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects. 
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: Burkina Faso UNDP Project Document (March 17, 2009)

Contacts

UNDP
Aki Kogachi
Country Officer
Blaise Bobodo Sawodogo
Project Coordinator
UNDP
Mame Diop
Regional Technical Advisor

Working with community groups in six village areas to combat the negative impacts of climate change, especially on agriculture.