Programme Support for Climate Change Adaptation in the Vulnerable Regions of Mopti and Timbuktu

Project Overview

The "Programme Support for Climate Change Adaptation in the Vulnerable Regions of Mopti and Timbuktu" project in Mali will work to increase the resilience of vulnerable communities and their adaptive capacity to climate change in the regions of Mopti and Timbuktu, including the Faguibine system zone.

Located in the Sahel of West Africa, Mali has a dry climate with 65% of its territory under semi-desert and desert conditions. Climate change is expected to increase the variability and the incidence of extreme weather events, such as droughts, floods, intense rainfall events. Without improved planning and management and particularly improved water management, climate change will destroy crops and property, and lead to greater degradation of already fragile soils. Regardless of whether there is an increase or decrease in precipitation, increased temperatures will cause greater evapo-transpiration, which will lead to drier soils in many areas and a corresponding decrease in water availability.

The programme will generate clear adaptation benefits that will assist Mali to make the transition towards climate resilient food security through:

(i) enhanced ability of small farmers and pastoralists to cope with increasing climate variability;

(ii) systematic integration of the risks associated with climate change, including variability into key natural resources, water and agriculture development policies, plans and legislation; and

(iii) strengthened institutional capacity to prepare and respond to climate change threats on water and food production systems.

Adaptation benefits will also result from the catalytic and innovative nature of the programme and the valuable lessons learnt and information generated. By its simultaneous focus on enhancing food security, promoting resilient rural household livelihoods, rehabilitation of water systems, and facilitating access to adaptation technologies, the programme brings together the crucial elements needed for demonstrating climate-proofing and fostering a paradigm shift in providing holistic adaptation beyond a merely sectoral approach in Mali.

Expected Outcomes

Outcome 1 - Increased climate change resilience of local water systems in Mopti and Timbuktu regions

Outcome 2 - The production of local livelihood systems such as agriculture, fisheries, livestock, and forest enhanced under climate change

Outcome 3 - Enhanced capacity of local institutions and of communities to better adapt to climate change

Project Details

Levels of Intervention

District

Source of Funds

Adaptation Fund

Key Implementers

National Governments

Funding Amounts

US$8.5 million (Adaptation Fund)

Project Partners

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Adaptation Fund
Agency for Environment and Sustainable Development (AEDD), Ministry of Environment and Sanitation, Government of Mali

Introduction

The "Programme Support for Climate Change Adaptation in the Vulnerable Regions of Mopti and Timbuktu" project in Mali will work to increase the resilience of vulnerable communities and their adaptive capacity to climate change in the regions of Mopti and Timbuktu, including the Faguibine system zone.

Located in the Sahel of West Africa, Mali has a dry climate with 65% of its territory under semi-desert and desert conditions. Climate change is expected to increase the variability and the incidence of extreme weather events, such as droughts, floods, intense rainfall events. Without improved planning and management and particularly improved water management, climate change will destroy crops and property, and lead to greater degradation of already fragile soils. Regardless of whether there is an increase or decrease in precipitation, increased temperatures will cause greater evapo-transpiration, which will lead to drier soils in many areas and a corresponding decrease in water availability.

The programme will generate clear adaptation benefits that will assist Mali to make the transition towards climate resilient food security through:

(i) enhanced ability of small farmers and pastoralists to cope with increasing climate variability;

(ii) systematic integration of the risks associated with climate change, including variability into key natural resources, water and agriculture development policies, plans and legislation; and

(iii) strengthened institutional capacity to prepare and respond to climate change threats on water and food production systems.

Adaptation benefits will also result from the catalytic and innovative nature of the programme and the valuable lessons learnt and information generated. By its simultaneous focus on enhancing food security, promoting resilient rural household livelihoods, rehabilitation of water systems, and facilitating access to adaptation technologies, the programme brings together the crucial elements needed for demonstrating climate-proofing and fostering a paradigm shift in providing holistic adaptation beyond a merely sectoral approach in Mali.

Project Details

Mali experiences severe recurrent shocks particularly droughts, locust infestation and irregular rainfalls causing reduction in agricultural yields and water resources severely affecting the livelihoods of the people and national development. There are also extreme climate events such as flooding.

The NAPA assessment, for example, concluded that climate change is likely to cause significant losses in crop production (like millet, sorghum, maize and rice) by 2025 and 2050. This demonstrate that farming systems in Mali are extremely vulnerable to climate change and climate variability.

The root causes of vulnerability include significant reliance on rain-fed production systems, ongoing practices of crop and livestock selections, water resource management, rangeland management, drought ill-preparedness, and household income generation that are not compatible with increasing impacts of climate change.

Other drivers of vulnerability include: (i) increasing demographic trends e.g. climate-induced refugee movements into regions least affected by drought, which cause intense pressure on productive arable lands; (ii) shortage of basic investment in market instruments in rural areas (such as access to credit, limited market outlets, etc.); and (iii) lack of land tenure regulation that hinders development of the the sector.

In the context of the above root causes , the performance of production systems (agriculture, fisheries, livestock, forestry, etc.) and the capacity to adapt are limited.

The National Policy, Strategy and Action Plan on Climate Change for Mali (AEDD 2011) clearly states government recognition of the problem of climate change by this problem statement:

"In Mali, climate change threatens key sectors of the economy: Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries, Forestry, Energy, Health, and Infrastructure. Without an organized response and anticipated level of governance of these sectors to address these challenges, climate change could be very threatening on the development of Mali."

There is a high level of uncertainty associated in climate projections for Mali, and West Africa in general, particularly for changes in precipitation.In the Third Assessment Report (TAR) of the IPCC, general circulation model simulations suggest a future warming of 0.2 degrees C per decade (low warming scenario) to more than 0.5 degrees C ( high warming scenario) by 2030. While some models predict a decrease in precipitation, others suggest increased rainfall under the most rapid global change scenario. No clear outcome regarding future climatology has emerged for the Sahel region.

Models do agree, however, on the increased unpredictability of rainfall, and this is consistent with local observations. 

This climate variability threatens to undermine Mali's ability to acheive development goals, reduce poverty, improve food security and build a resilient nation.

Thematic Area: 
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme will directly benefit about 28,000 households in the selected regions. Given average household sizes of around five people, this will translate to about 140,000 direct beneficiaries. Beneficiaries include vulnerable households, communities, communes and local elected governments, and the national government and decentralized structures.
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Adaptation Fund
Agency for Environment and Sustainable Development (AEDD), Ministry of Environment and Sanitation, Government of Mali
Project Status: 
Under Implementation
Location: 
Unspecified
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.5 million (Adaptation Fund)

Country Initiatives

Enhancing Adaptive Capacity and Resilience to Climate Change in the Agriculture Sector in Mali

Flood Hazard and Climate Risk Management to Secure Lives and Assets in Mali

Flooding and other climate change risks have a severe impact on the people of Mali. Significant flooding events over the past 30 years have impacted over 3 million people, taking lives, destroying infrastructure, causing serious economic losses, and derailing efforts to build more resilient lives and livelihoods.

Enhancing Climate Resilience of the Vulnerable Communities and Ecosystems in Somalia

With financing from the Global Environment Facility’s (GEF) Least Developed Country Countries Fund, the Federal Government of Somalia, in partnership with UNDP, is working to bolster the resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems to climate change. The project is working in semi-autonomous states in Somalia: South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland, which unilaterally declared itself an independent republic in 1991.

Strengthening the resilience of women producer groups and vulnerable communities in Mali

Enhancing Climate Resilience of the Vulnerable Communities and Ecosystems in Somalia

With financing from the Global Environment Facility’s (GEF) Least Developed Country Countries Fund, the Federal Government of Somalia, in partnership with UNDP, is working to bolster the resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems to climate change. The project is working in semi-autonomous states in Somalia: South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland, which unilaterally declared itself an independent republic in 1991.

Flood Hazard and Climate Risk Management to Secure Lives and Assets in Mali

Flooding and other climate change risks have a severe impact on the people of Mali. Significant flooding events over the past 30 years have impacted over 3 million people, taking lives, destroying infrastructure, causing serious economic losses, and derailing efforts to build more resilient lives and livelihoods.

Programme for the Support of the National Adaptation Strategy to Climate Change in Mali

Like other countries in the Sahel, Mali is susceptible to climate variability and is suffering from the impacts of global climate change. According to forecasts, rainfall will fluctuate even more in the future and the frequency of extreme events such as drought or heavy rain will increase. The poorest groups are harder hit by the impacts of climate change because they depend directly on natural resources for their livelihoods.

Supporting Mali to advance their NAP Process

A NAP support mission to Mali is being prepared, which will help to enhance the understanding of the NAP and of the tools and methods available to advance the process. High level decisions makers will be sensitized on the NAP process during this upcoming support mission.

Contacts

UNDP
Clotilde Goeman
Regional Technical Advisor