Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development & Adaptation in Tanzania

Introduction

This project will initiate Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) frameworks in the Pangani River Basin of Northern Tanzania. These frameworks will address climate change and pilot adaptation measures. It is one of the first field-based climate change preparation projects in Eastern Africa with strong links to basin and national planning and policy, and as such will build national and regional capacity, provide lessons and serve as a national and regional demonstration site.

Source: Tanzania Project Document (PIMS: 3308)

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Project Details

In terms of development, the object is to prepare water managers and users for changing climatic conditions (especially reduced flows) through provision of technical data, planning, and improved allocation, capacity building and awareness-raising. The overall goal is to mainstream climate change into Integrated Water Resources Management in the Pangani Basin, so that it may support the equitable provision of freshwater for the environment and for livelihoods for current and future generations.

The Pangani River Basin is about 43,650 km2, with about 5% of this area in Kenya and the remainder distributed across the Arusha, Manyara, Kilimanjaro and Tanga administrative regions of Tanzania. The Pangani River system drains the southern and eastern sides of Africa’s highest peak, Mt. Kilimanjaro (5,985 m), as well as Mt. Meru (4,566 m), then passes through the arid Maasai Steppe, draining the Pare and Usambara Mountain Ranges before reaching the coastal town of Pangani, marking its estuary with the Indian Ocean. See Annex 2 for map of Pangani Basin. Most project activities are concentrated in Tanzania, however, some activities and processes, especially those involving Lake Jipe, will include Kenyan stakeholders and field sites.

The Pangani Basin has an estimated population of 3.7 million people, 80% of whom rely, either directly or indirectly, on agriculture for their livelihoods (IUCN 2003). In addition to nationally important large and small scale agricultural resources, the basin also includes four hydroelectric power facilities with a combined production capacity of 91.5 MW or 17% of Tanzania’s national power grid capacity (IUCN 2003).

The Pangani Basin is a water-stressed area with many latent and emerging conflicts among water user groups. The basin has been adversely affected by changing climatic conditions during the past decade and the situation will likely worsen as temperature increases are expected to reduce annual flow in the basin by 6-10% (VPO-URT 2003, OECD 2003). The eness-raising. Within this overall purpose, project outcomes and activities will focus on three technical areas:

  • Understanding current and future climatic vulnerability (in the broadest sense of the term): and developing and using such information for more equitable water allocation in a changing hydrological regime
  • Negotiated outcomes to minimize future climatic vulnerability and future climatic risk: Continuing dialogues to ensure sustainable water resources management
  • Incorporating climate change adaptation in the water sector: national linkages and lessons learned. Lessons learned will come from experiences of all three outcomes

Components:

  • Conducting an assessment of water flows for the Pangani River
  • Training 10 technicians to understand climate change implications for river flow
  • Establishing a catchment forum to discuss water management and other stakeholder management forums to build awareness and political will to resolve conflicts
  • Promoting basin-level participation in national climate change and water management
  • Developing and disseminating awareness materials on the implications of climate change and various likely river flow scenarios among local authorities, decision makers, communities and the private sector.

Outputs:

  • Management and allocation of water in Pangani Basin includes climate change preparation and adaptation and environmental considerations in a sound Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) framework

Source: Tanzania Project Document (PIMS: 3308)

Thematic Area: 
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local communities, including subsistence farmers, pastoralists, and commercial farmers among others, are competing for dwindling water resources in Pangani Basin. The project will benefit these primary stakeholders by raising awareness about climate change, providing technical advice and capacity to water user associations and also by creating various forums for communities to express their views and participate in decision-making about water resources.
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
Government of Tanzania
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Global Environment Facility (GEF)
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)
Project Status: 
Completed
Location: 
Urban
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
1,000,000 (as of November 15, 2010)
Co-Financing Total: 
3,750,000 (as od November 15, 2010)

Key Results and Outputs

The Objectives: Prepare water managers and users for changing climatic conditions (especially reduced flows) through provision of technical data, planning, and improved allocation, capacity building and awareness-raising. Within this overall purpose, project outcomes and activities will focus on three technical areas:

  • Understanding current and future climatic vulnerability (in the broadest sense of the term): and developing and using such information for more equitable water allocation in a changing hydrological regime
  • Negotiated outcomes to minimize future climatic vulnerability and future climatic risk: Continuing dialogues to ensure sustainable water resources management
  • Incorporating climate change adaptation in the water sector: national linkages and lessons learned. Lessons learned will come from experiences of all three outcomes

Components:

  • Conducting an assessment of water flows for the Pangani River
  • Training 10 technicians to understand climate change implications for river flow
  • Establishing a catchment forum to discuss water management and other stakeholder management forums to build awareness and political will to resolve conflicts
  • Promoting basin-level participation in national climate change and water management
  • Developing and disseminating awareness materials on the implications of climate change and various likely river flow scenarios among local authorities, decision makers, communities and the private sector.

Outputs:

  • Management and allocation of water in Pangani Basin includes climate change preparation and adaptation and environmental considerations in a sound Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) framework

Source: Tanzania Project Document (PIMS: 3308)

Monitoring and Evaluation

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits: 

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Establish a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: Tanzania Project Document (PIMS: 3308)

Contacts

UNDP
Mark Tadross
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Savinus Kessy
Country Officer