Strategic Planning and Action to strengthen climate Resilience of Communities in Nusa Tenggara Timor province (SPARC)

Introduction

The project will apply a holistic approach to improve rural livelihoods and food security by strengthening climate resilience. It will work simultaneously at the policy and grassroots levels. It will create continuous dialogue between these levels and stakeholders involved to ensure that policies to be developed or revised are based on needs and lessons learned from the grassroots.

The climate induced problem that this project is focused on is that the impacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT. Rural communities in NTT are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. Underlying causes of the problem include 1) Systemic vulnerabilities are high due to geographical and geophysical factors (remote and archipelagic area, with a naturally high climate variability); 2) Slow development progress in NTT (e.g. short term planning, reactive responses to problems, poor infrastructure and communication network); 3) Decentralization challenges (e.g. ineffective coordination, little attention to capacity development for sub-national institutions, 4) Community challenges such as low education levels, cultural perspectives on adopting new approaches and practices.

The project will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution: 1) Local government (including both provincial and district governments) has integrated climate resilience principles in policy, planning and budgeting, and have the institutional capacity to develop, implement and monitor this; and 2) Communities will strengthen and diversify their livelihoods in anticipation of further changes in the climate and its impacts. Identified barriers that local government and the communities are facing to improve livelihoods, food security and water security in a changing climate include informational, policy, financial, individual, and institutional barriers, with gender cutting across these.

Project Details

Rural communities in Nusa Tenggara Timur [NTT] are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. The climate-induced problem that this project is focused on is that the mpacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT.

SCCF funding will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security, to pave the way for climate resilient development in NTT. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution with regard to:

1. Local government and climate resilient development
2. Climate resilient rural communities

Thematic Area: 
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Villages in Nusa Tenggara Timor province
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
BAPPEDA: Badan Perencana Pembangunan Daerah (Regional Body for Planning and Development)
Indonesia Ministry of Environment (Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup)
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Global Environment Facility (GEF)
Project Status: 
Under Implementation
Location: 
Rural
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
5,000,000 (GEF/SCCF), 100,000 (UNDP)
Co-Financing Total: 
6,337,332 (UNDP), 67,873,318 (Government of NTT)

Key Results and Outputs

At the national level, the project will address climate resilience in terms of food, water and livelihood security in NTT, serving as a model for climate resilient development in an increasingly decentralized Indonesia. The project will thus contribute to MDG 1– Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger. Progress on this is of particular importance to NTT because the province has the highest prevalence of underweight children under five years of age, and almost a quarter of the NTT population is below the national poverty line.

Expected project outcomes are:
1. Institutional capacity developed to integrate climate resilience in sustainable development at provincial and district level
2. Livelihoods of vulnerable rural communities strengthened in a changing climate

At the provincial level, SCCF resources will be used to raise awareness, develop institutional capacity, and to integrate climate resilience in development planning, programmes and budgeting. This will indirectly benefit the whole population of NTT, which are 4.7 million people (about 960,000 households).

At the district level, SCCF resources will be invested in 3 districts for integrating climate resilience in district level development planning and programmes and access to knowledge and information, reaching out to all villages and households in these districts:
• Sabu Raijua which has a population size of 91,870 people (18,869 households), living in 58 villages (Desa) and 5 urban neighborhoods (Kelurahan). 
• East Sumba which has a population size of 225,906 people (46,465 households), living in 140 villages and 16 urban neighborhoods
• Manggarai which has a population of 512,065 (105,323 households) living in 132 villages and 17 urban neighborhoods

Out of these 330 villages, SCCF resources will be directly invested in 120 villages (approximately 34,000 households) to develop community vulnerability reduction assessments, community action plans, strengthen resilience of existing livelihoods, introduce alternative livelihoods, and develop climate resilient water resources management, to integrate climate resilience in community development plans, and to develop community based climate risk information system.
 

Monitoring and Evaluation

The project will be monitored through the following M& E activities:

Project start: 
A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan.

The Inception Workshop should address a number of key issues including:
a) Assist all partners to fully understand and take ownership of the project. Detail the roles, support services and complementary responsibilities of UNDP CO and RCU staff vis à vis the project team.  Discuss the roles, functions, and responsibilities within the project's decision-making structures, including reporting and communication lines, and conflict resolution mechanisms.  The Terms of Reference for project staff will be discussed again as needed.
b) Based on the project results framework and the relevant SOF (e.g. GEF) Tracking Tool if appropriate, finalize the first annual work plan.  Review and agree on the indicators, targets and their means of verification, and recheck assumptions and risks. 
c) Provide a detailed overview of reporting, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) requirements.  The Monitoring and Evaluation work plan and budget should be agreed and scheduled.
d) Discuss financial reporting procedures and obligations, and arrangements for annual audit.
e) Plan and schedule Project Board meetings.  Roles and responsibilities of all project organisation structures should be clarified and meetings planned.  The first Project Board meeting should be held within the first 12 months following the inception workshop.

An Inception Workshop report is a key reference document and must be prepared and shared with participants to formalize various agreements and plans decided during the meeting. 

Quarterly:
Progress made shall be monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Managment Platform.
Based on the initial risk analysis submitted, the risk log shall be regularly updated in ATLAS.  Risks become critical when the impact and probability are high.  Note that for UNDP GEF projects, all financial risks associated with financial instruments such as revolving funds, microfinance schemes, or capitalization of ESCOs are automatically classified as critical on the basis of their innovative nature (high impact and uncertainty due to no previous experience justifies classification as critical).
Based on the information recorded in Atlas, a Project Progress Reports (PPR) can be generated in the Executive Snapshot.
Other ATLAS logs can be used to monitor issues, lessons learned etc. The use of these functions is a key indicator in the UNDP Executive Balanced Scorecard.

Annually:
 Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR):  This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) reporting requirements. 

The APR/PIR includes, but is not limited to, reporting on the following:
• Progress made toward project objective and project outcomes - each with indicators, baseline data and end-of-project targets (cumulative) 
• Project outputs delivered per project outcome (annual).
• Lesson learned/good practice.
• AWP and other expenditure reports
• Risk and adaptive management
• ATLAS QPR
• Portfolio level indicators (i.e. GEF focal area tracking tools) are used by most focal areas on an annual basis as well. 

Periodic Monitoring through site visits:
UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-term of project cycle:
The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation at the mid-point of project implementation (insert date).  The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed. It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  The organization, terms of reference and timing of the mid-term evaluation will be decided after consultation between the parties to the project document. The Terms of Reference for this Mid-term evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.  The management response and the evaluation will be uploaded to UNDP corporate systems, in particular the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the mid-term evaluation cycle.

End of Project:
An independent Final Evaluation will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) guidance. The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals. The Terms of Reference for this evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.

The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities and requires a management response which should be uploaded to PIMS and to the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (e.g GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the final evaluation.

During the final three months, the project team will prepare the Project Terminal Report. This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and knowledge sharing:
Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects. Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this and related projects.

Audit: 
Project audit will follow UNDP Financial Rules and Regulations, and applicable Audit policies.

Contacts

UNDP
Alex Heikens
Regional Policy Advisor - Climate Change
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Role of NGO in SPARC project is to :
  • Provide technical support for communities in vulnerable villages in developing climate adaptation proposal to be funded by SPARC project and technical expertise in the field of food/water/livelihoods resilience;
  • Facilitate institutional readiness at village level for accessing funding and implementation of activities (legal standing of the community group, bank account opening, community group management structure)
  • Facilitate and monitor implementation of CCA activities by communities;
  • Advocating issuance of village and district level policies for integrating CCA into development planning and budgeting to ensure sustainability of interventions. SPARC is collaborating with 3 local NGOs in each of its pilot district, namely:
  • Cis Timor for work in Sabu Raijua district  
  • Koppesda for East Sumba District
  • Tunas  Jaya Foundation  for Manggarai district.