Climate Change Adaptation in the News

January 2018

January 2018

Climate change law in offing in Uganda

New Vision Uganda

Wednesday 31 January 2018

Minister Kitutu said that while the National Climate Change Policy, 2015 provides direction for keys sectors to implement climate change adaptation and mitigation actions, it lacks an enforcement mechanism. Enforcement remains the biggest challenge to the implementation of climate change adaptation and mitigation, according to the state minister of environment, Dr Mary Goretti Kitutu. She said it is the reason why many natural features, including lakes, wetlands and forests continue to be destroyed. Statistics show that the country loses about 100,000 hectares of forest cover every year, a situation that is worsening the effects of climate change. “While there has been a lot of talk about the need to conserve our wetlands, a number of them have been degraded for commercial purposes,” Kitutu said. She stressed that while the National Climate Change Policy, 2015 provides direction for keys sectors to implement climate change adaptation and mitigation actions, it lacks an enforcement mechanism. The minister made the remarks during a ministerial meeting to discuss the draft climate change Bill development process at the Kampala Serena Hotel on Tuesday organised by Parliamentary Forum on Climate Change-Uganda (PFCC-U). The meeting was attended by a number of ministries that included tourism, local government, works, co-operatives, Kampala, land and agriculture. Kitutu highlighted some of the impacts of climate change on some of the sector that included water, health, agriculture, forestry, energy, transport and wetlands. “Floods leading to disease outbreaks, droughts leading to water shortage for agriculture, forestry and power production and also destruction of vital transport infrastructure are some of the potential impacts,” she explained. The Climate Change Bill, 2018 seeks to provide a framework for enforcing climate change adaptation actions through which Uganda will make adjustments in natural or human systems in response to actual impacts of climate change to reduce harm or exploit potential opportunities. The Bill also seeks to enable Uganda pursue its voluntary mitigation targets of reducing national greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, MPs asked the Government to enact a law to regulate activities on natural resources to avert the effects of climate change in the country. The law, according to MPs, seeks to protect the ecosystems threatened by population pressures and erosion that affect all those who depend on natural space. In 2015, Cabinet directed the Ministry of Water and Environment to initiate the legal framework on climate change. The chairperson of PFCC-U, Lawrence Biyika, said the legal framework will help the country to mainstream climate change in the country’s development processes. “We note that the Climate Change Bill has taken too long to be tabled in Parliament, yet the country is continuing to experience devastating effects of climate change,” Biyika said. State minister for works, Gen. Katumba Wamala welcomed the Bill, saying it will strengthen the climate change departments to manage all activities related to climate change. “This law should provide a regulatory framework for monitoring, reporting and verification of the implementation and impacts,” he said. Katumba warned that the war in Somalia came as a result of climate change in early 1990s. “The fighting started as a result of the drought that hit the country, as people struggled for survival,” Katumba said. He advised that countries which share River Nile should provide a fund to Uganda to protect the environment. State minister for tourism Godfrey Kiwanda appealed to the citizens to help the Government in sensitising the public and apprehending people destroying or privatising wetlands. “We should take action against the investor who is setting up at taxi park at Lubigi wetland before we lose the swamp,” Kiwanda said. State minister for local government Jenifer Namuyangu advised fellow ministers to enact laws which can be implemented. “The law that banned the use of Kavera is in place, but people continue to buy, sell and litter Buvera,” Namuyangu said. She called for punitive penalties for professionals who are paid to protect the environment but end up destroying it. “We need a strong enforcement mechanism to this law, otherwise it will go like other laws,” Namuyangu stressed.

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Morocco: 30th AU Summit - UNDP Lauds Morocco's "Very Active" Role in Fighting Climate Change

All Africa

Tuesday 30 January 2018

The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) lauded on Monday in Addis Ababa the "very active" role played by Morocco in the fight against climate change at the level of the African Union (AU) and the United Nations. Morocco plays a "very active" role in the fight against climate change both within the AU and at the UN level, UNDP Administrator, Achim Steiner, told reporters at the end of a meeting of the Committee of African Heads of State and Government on Climate Change (CAHOSCC), held on the sidelines of the 30th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the African Union (AU). "Morocco's leadership is very important, particularly in the field of renewable energies and in the development of climate change adaptation and mitigation policies," he pointed out. The UNDP Administrator praised, in this regard, the initiatives undertaken by Morocco in the energy sector. Morocco sets "an example to other countries," he said, stressing that the UNDP and the whole UN system have very active relations with Morocco. He expressed confidence that this fruitful partnership will grow stronger in the coming years. Morocco was represented in the CAHOSCC meeting by Head of Government, Saad Eddine El Othmani.

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Ghana to make its climate policies legally binding

Climate Action Programme

Tuesday 30 January 2018

Ghana is considering enshrining its climate policies into law so as to send the right message to development agencies that the country is committed to climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. In an interview with the Xinhua news agency Peter Dery, Head of Climate Change and Sustainable Development Unit of the Ministry of Environment warned that until regulations are turned into laws their enforcement would face more challenges. “The issue has to do with enforcement. What we are beginning to do now is to turn the policy into legally mandatory instruments like laws. So we are looking, for example, at revising the Building Code to ensure that some of the things in the policy reflect in the new Building Regulation”, he revealed. The interview took place after a meeting regarding the Green Climate Fund (GCF) Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme- an initiative aimed at supporting the efforts of developing countries respond to climate change. The Readiness Programme was rolled out in June 2015 and comprised a series of workshops on climate policies and procedures. The Ministry of Finance has collaborated with the Ministry of Environment to enhance Ghana’s capacity to access international climate finance, including the Green Climate Fund. Some of the institutions which have been involved are the Energy Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Forestry Commission. These bodies have submitted the “Accelerating Solar Action Programme”, the “Resilient Landscapes for Sustainable Livelihoods Programme” and the Ghana Shea Landscapes REDD+ Project aimed at reducing emissions from deforestation. Adwoa Fraikue, Head of Natural Resource, Environmental and Climate Change at the Ministry of Finance, said that Ghana recognises its vulnerabilities from the impacts of climate change and it has been working hard to mitigate the risks even before the launch of the Green Climate Fund facility. “We are aware of rainfall destroying our agriculture; we are aware of flooding affecting our cities and villages; sea erosion washing away our coastal communities; and the destruction of infrastructure”, she said.

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UN Humanitarian and Development Chiefs’ Mission to Ethiopia

UNDP

Monday 29 January 2018

Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock and United Nations Development Programme Administrator and Vice Chair of the UN Development Group Achim Steiner will travel to Ethiopia from January 27 to 29 to highlight the immense challenge of persistent food insecurity and the new approach to addressing it. Ethiopia has made remarkable strides in development and addressing food insecurity over the past three decades, but its susceptibility to drought has resulted in recurring food insecurity. In recent months, hundreds of thousands of people on the border between the Somali and Oromo regions have been displaced, requiring additional humanitarian response. Today, millions of people need assistance to survive, for which US$900 million will be required this year. The UN principals will highlight the need to continue life-saving humanitarian assistance as an urgent priority, while simultaneously laying the foundations for long-term resilience to future shocks and recovery. They will meet with senior Government officials and humanitarian and development partners, and travel to field locations to meet people who have been affected by drought and assess programmes that link the humanitarian response with resilience and recovery. They will also attend the African Union Summit and participate in a high-level meeting on the New Way of Working.

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GCF 2018 Letter to Partners

Green Climate Fund

Monday 29 January 2018

This will include a focus on national adaptation planning and processes, enabled by an additional USD 50 million budget to the readiness programme approved at the 18th GCF Board meeting held from the end of September. We will also look for opportunities to support effective and impactful country programming, which remains the key tool for countries to develop nationally-owned and high‑quality pipelines of funding proposals for GCF support.

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Le Maroc en matière de lutte contre l’impact des changements climatiques

Altas Info

Monday 29 January 2018

Le Maroc joue un rôle «très actif» en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques aussi bien au sein de l’UA qu’au niveau des Nations Unies, a dit Achim Steiner, Administrateur du Programme onusien, dans une déclaration à la presse à l’issue d’une réunion du Comité des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement sur les changements climatiques (CAHOSCC), tenue en marge du 30è sommet africain, dont les travaux se déroulent actuellement au siège du bloc panafricain dans la capitale éthiopienne.
 
Le Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement (PNUD) a salué, lundi à Addis-Abeba, le rôle «très actif» que joue le Maroc en matière de lutte contre l’impact des changements climatiques aussi bien au niveau de l’Union africaine (UA) que celui des N

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Climate adaptation a reality for Africa - Achim Steiner

Walta

Monday 29 January 2018

The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) said that countries in Africa should understand the impacts climate change on weather patterns, availability of water and farm land usage.

"UNDP has a very strong push forward to the African climate change adaptation initiative and many people across the continent now know that climate adaptation is a reality"   UNDP Administrator, Achim Steiner told journalist in the sideline of African Union Summit being underway in Addis Ababa.

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Conflict, climate change major challenges behind Africa's hunger, poverty: UN

Xinhua News

Monday 29 January 2018

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said on Saturday that conflict and climate change are the major reasons behind Africa's highest rate of poverty and hunger. Guterres, while addressing a high-level event on "Ending Hunger in Africa" that was held on Saturday on the sidelines of the 30th African Union (AU) summit in Ethiopia, said that Africa, with highest rate of hunger in the world, needs to eradicate conflict and climate change so as to end hunger. "World hunger is on the rise, and Africa has the highest rate of hunger in the world," Guterres said, adding that "Agriculture and livestock productivity in Africa is under threat and this is largely due to conflict and climate change." Guterres, who noted that hunger cases as twice as high in conflict affected countries, said that "climate shocks, environmental degradation, crop and livestock price collapse, and conflict are all inter-linked."

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En Nariño nutrirán plan sobre el cambio climático

HSB Noticias

Friday 26 January 2018

La Secretaría de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible en articulación con la Oficina de Cooperación Internacional y con apoyo del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo – Pnud, realizarán el diplomado de Gestión del cambio climático territorial, Nariño actúa por el clima. El objetivo de este espacio es desarrollar y nutrir el Plan Integral de Gestión del Cambio Climático Territorial y la política pública en coordinación con la Mesa Departamental. “La importancia del diplomado es que aparte de ser un proceso de formación y educación va a tener un conjunto de actores dedicados a la gestión territorial del cambio climático en Nariño quienes van a nutrir, validar y apoyar los contenidos de nuestro plan de gestión Nariño Actúa por el Clima”, indicó la profesional de apoyo técnico Xiomara Acevedo. La funcionaria del componente de Mitigación y Adaptación al Cambio Climático de la Secretaría de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible indicó que también se trabajará en la política pública que deberá ser aprobada por la Asamblea.

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Climate services for resilience: the changing roles of NGOs in Ethiopia

ReliefWeb

Friday 26 January 2018

The NMA produces regular reports in Amharic, which are distributed to NGOs throughout the country, with data including rainfall distribution and weather forecasts. Alongside these developments, the NMA, with support from donors (GEF, UNDP and WFP), NGOs and government organizations (ATA and MoEFCC) has been rapidly expanding its network of meteorological stations. Multiple government agencies and a large number of NGOs increasingly engage with climate information. First-step efforts of coordination have strengthened activities. For example, in recent emergency events there have been multi-sectoral assessments led by the government and UN OCHA, in partnership with NGOs. Within recurrent events within the Somali regional state of Ethiopia, Oxfam reports that the NMA reports and the FEWS Net future scenarios are used to inform projects, situation reports and humanitarian requirement documents that influence funding and programming. While this is important progress, coordination efforts require on-going strengthening.

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Les effets du changement climatique de mieux en mieux maîtrisés au Nord-Cameroun

Media Terre

Monday 22 January 2018

Les populations de la partie septentrionale du Cameroun s’adaptent de mieux en mieux aux effets du changement climatique. C’est le constat dégagé lors la réunion du Comité de pilotage du Programme d’amélioration de la résilience des populations aux effets du changement climatique (Repecc) qui s’est tenu le 17 janvier 2017 à Yaoundé. D’après le bilan dressé au cours de cette réunion, il en ressort que depuis le lancement du programme en 2013 jusqu’en 2017, 80% des institutions et des populations cibles du programme utilisent des outils développés, 70% des populations maîtrisent les bonnes pratiques agro-sylvo-pastorales et 25 structures ont déjà accès aux outils de mobilisation des ressources financières. Pour le ministre camerounais de l’Environnement, de la Protection de la nature et du Développement durable, Pierre Hele, qui présidait la réunion, ce programme qui a été lancé à la suite de la rude sécheresse et des inondations qui ont frappé la partie septentrionale du Cameroun entre 2011 et 2012 entrainant des destructions d’étendues agricoles et des pertes en vies humaines, donne ainsi aujourd’hui des résultats probants. Lancé avec l’appui du Programme des Nations unies pour le développement, ce programme vise à accompagner les interventions nationales et sous-régionales pour la préservation des écosystèmes et l’amélioration de la résilience des populations aux effets du changement climatique. Et après les résultats flatteurs de la première phase, il a été décidé au cours des travaux de ce comité de pilotage de lancer une seconde phase qui va permettre d’étendre le programme à d’autres communes des régions du Nord-Cameroun.

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Growing with the grain

ReliefWeb

Monday 22 January 2018

The Green Production Landscapes project was developed to respond to the tension between the farmers’ desire to increase grain production and the need to protect the environment. It is implemented by the Environment Ministry with support from UNDP and funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). With the aim of promoting biodiversity and sustainable soil management, the National Platform of Sustainable Commodities was created, made up of producers from the area, including Blanca and Edoard. Both participated in the drafting of the 2018 action plan, which includes the diffusion of good agricultural practices. A land registry of the Naranjal farms will be established to monitor compliance with environmental regulations. A website will provide information on each farm, from the state of payment of taxes to the verification of forest area coverage and protection of waterways, among other data. "The bread we put on the table every day comes from wheat. The milk comes from cows that eat corn and soybean meal. People seem to have forgotten that in the morning, they want to have breakfast, at noon they look for lunch, and at night they have dinner. All that comes from here, where the food is produced. " Over time, and with sustained commitment, Edoard hopes the changes he and other farmers are making will win back the trust of the community.

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INITIATIVE AFRICAINE SUR L’ADAPTATION La contribution gabonaise sera gérée par le PNUD

Le Defi Gabon

Monday 22 January 2018

Le Chef de l’Etat, Ali Bongo Ondimba, souhaite par la contribution gabonaise de 500 000 dollars servir de catalyseur pour une forte mobilisation de ressources au profit de l’Initiative Africaine d’Adaptation. Une contribution dont la gestion vient d’être confiée au Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD). Il s’agit d’une contribution de 500 000 dollars annoncée par le Président Ali Bongo Ondimba lors du Sommet One Planet à Paris, en décembre 2017, pour appuyer cette initiative lancée à Paris lors de la 21ème Conférence des Parties (COP21) en décembre 2015. Le PNUD ainsi investi du rôle de gestionnaire de ce fonds, s’engage à appuyer avec une grande détermination les actions de mobilisation de ressources par une utilisation efficiente des ressources.

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Fishermen turn mangrove protectors, successfully farm crabs in estuaries

Your Story

Tuesday 16 January 2018

Coastal communities in Maharashtra’s Sindhudurg district are earning supplementary incomes by farming crabs with help from the state government and development agencies... Using this awareness, the UNDP Global Environmental Finance initiated a four-year-long mangrove crab farming plan in 2011 in 17 villages of Sindhudurg district, spread across 28.5 acres, to encourage local people to conserve mangroves.

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A UNDP effort aims to marry conservation, livelihood in Sindhudurg

Hindustan Times

Monday 15 January 2018

Around 8am every day, nine women aged 27 to 55 clamber onto two boats and head to the Mandvi creek in Vengurla, Sindhudurg. The area is home to 45 otters, spread across two dens. The two groups take tourists along a 300-metre stretch on one-hour boat rides, talking to them not just about the marine life but also about the mangroves they depend on. As the tour proceeds, the women use pointed sticks to clear garbage from the mangrove roots. These women are part of the Swamini Mahila Bachat Gat, constituted as one of 60 projects in the district that aim to tackle the garbage issue threatening the biodiversity of Sindhudurg’s creeks. “We have been trained to speak in English and Hindi. We received hospitality training and also learnt about different mangrove species, when they flower, their medicinal benefits etc,” said Shweta Hule. “We know how trash coming from cities within the district through the creek chokes the breathing roots of these mangrove trees, and why it is essential to remove it and protect this area.” The 60 programmes are livelihood schemes framed by the state mangrove cell in association with the UNDP-GEF (United Nations Development Programme - Global Environment Facility) Project between 2012 and 2016, based on a study of the coastal ecosystem and the threats it faces. Sindhudurg accounts for 3% of Maharashtra’s total mangrove cover but houses more of its coastal biodiversity that any other district in the state.

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Le PNUD met en place un système de base de données commune pour la zone maritime de gestion Maurice-Seychelles

FrenchChina.org

Monday 15 January 2018

Le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) a signé jeudi un accord pour mettre en place un système de base de données commune qui facilitera la gestion de la zone maritime Maurice-Seychelles, a indiqué jeudi le Bureau du Premier ministre mauricien dans un communiqué. Ce projet contribuera aux travaux de planification spatiale marine de la Commission mixte et permettra aux deux pays de mieux communiquer et échanger des données dans la zone conjointe. En décembre 2008, Maurice et les Seychelles, parties à la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer, ont présenté conjointement à la Commission des limites du plateau continental des Nations Unies (CLPC) un plateau continental étendu au-delà des limites des zones économiques exclusives du plateau des Mascareignes. La zone comprend une vaste étendue de fond marin et un sous-sol marin sous-jacent d'environ 396.000 km². La CLPC a nommé une sous-commission qui a examiné le dossier en 2009. Après de longues délibérations, la CLPC a formulé ses recommandations en mars 2011, conférant à Maurice et aux Seychelles la compétence conjointe sur cette zone commune. Cette zone se situe au-delà des zones économiques exclusives des deux pays, ce qui ouvre la porte à de nouvelles opportunités de coopération entre les deux pays, notamment en matière de ressources pétrolières et gazières, de gisements minéraux et d'organismes marins vivants.

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Aide du PNUD aux initiatives locales

Republic of Togo

Monday 15 January 2018

Le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) a accordé vendredi un appui de près de 100 millions de Fcfa a quatre ONG et à deux comités villageois qui favorisent la préservation de l’environnement. Un financement issu du Fonds pour l’environnement mondial (FEM). Les projets concernent la protection des écosystèmes des montagnes, la conservation des forêts communautaires, la lutte contre la dégradation des terres, la promotion de l’écotourisme, la collecte et le recyclage des déchets plastiques et la bonne pratique de gestion durable des terres. La convention a été signée par Kardhiata Lo N’Diaye, la représentante du Système des Nations Unies au Togo, en présence d’André Johnson, le ministre de l’Environnement. Le projet vise à favoriser les initiatives communautaires innovantes tout en renforçant les moyens d’existence des populations. ‘Ce programme est pour nous d’une importance capitalee car il permet de soutenir des projets développés à la base par des acteurs à la base en lien direct avec les populations concernées’, a déclaré Mm Lo N’Diaye.

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One million Malawians in need of food support-DodMA

Maravi Post

Wednesday 10 January 2018

In addition, under the 6-year- US$ 16, 264, 545 Scaling up the use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems (M-CLIMES Project), with funds from the Green Climate Fund and the UNDP, the Department is working on expanding networks that generate climate-related data to save lives and safeguard livelihoods from extreme climate events, development and dissemination of products and platforms for climate-related information/services for vulnerable communities and livelihoods; and strengthening communities’ capacities for use of early warning systems and climate information in preparedness for response to climate related disasters, among others.

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Climate Adaptation Finance Update: MDBs Approve Projects with Co-benefits

IISD

Wednesday 10 January 2018

In Afghanistan, a US$71 million project financed by the LDCF, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the World Bank, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Afghan government, will focus on boosting the climate resilience of women and marginalized groups through measures in four areas: enhancing gender-sensitive disaster risk reduction at the community level; establishing community-based early warning systems; promoting climate-resilient agricultural practices and livelihoods; and working with government institutions at various levels on integrating climate change into planning. According to the UNDP, an estimated 80% of Afghanistan’s economic losses are caused by climate-induced disasters and extreme winters, and 75% of Afghans rely on agriculture for their livelihoods... The Global Environment Facility (GEF) wrote how a project in Liberia, supported by the UNDP and GEF-administered LDCF, which aimed to enhance the climate resilience of vulnerable coastal areas and communities, resulted in the construction of a 600-meter breakwater revetment that has reduced the vulnerability of thousands of families. The project will be replicated in another Liberian coastal community in 2018. [GEF Press Release]

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DevExplains: Green Climate Funds

Devex

Tuesday 9 January 2018

"What's interesting is that it's not just a single switch from maize to something else," said UNDP's Kurukulasuriya. "It's the likely means to switch again over time as conditions continue to change. This is part of the problem with climate change. It's not just that change is occurring, but that change is occurring at a faster rate than it has in mankind's lifetime. The need to have that flexibility to understand what's happening around you and to change with that at the right time, becomes an incredibly important part of the armoury that countries now have to develop." Assessing whether or not an impact is climate related requires undertaking a significant amount of climate modeling work or analysis, which Kurukulasuriya said is one of the major challenges that developing countries struggle with. Other common challenges, he notes, include lack of historical data at the community level and lack of technical capacity for forecasting the impacts of climate change as well as the effects of adaptation in both the near- and long-term. "So it becomes a question of ‘what can we do on top of what's already been done to ensure that these additional risks of climate change are managed better?’" said Pradeep Kurukulasuriya, head of climate change and adaptation programming at UNDP For organizations and developing countries still intent on formulating an adaptation proposal, the best way to pinpoint what adaptation finance should focus on is by first establishing a development baseline, then doing additionality reasoning in terms of management of risks associated with climate change hazards, advises Kurulasuriya. Establishing a baseline entails looking at what is being done today to address the non-climate change related drivers of the underlying problem and what is likely to happen without any additional interventions, given the reality unfolding in terms of climate change — that is, the likely range of effects or impacts. Then, in order to establish the “climate change additionality” rationale of a project, organizations have to identify those additional results that need to be achieved to minimize the effects of specific climate change induced impacts. This thought process is what allows one to formulate and justify the importance of select adaptation interventions that address the drivers that are directly attributable to climate change. "So it becomes a question of ‘what can we do on top of what's already been done to ensure that these additional risks of climate change are managed better?’" said Kurukulasuriya. "When you do that, you realize there's a lot of co-benefits to other development gains that you're also interested in achieving, such as women's empowerment, and you try to maximize those as much as possible."

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