Climate Change Adaptation in the News

February 2018

February 2018

Green Climate Fund, UNDP to build resilience of women to fight climate change in Bangladesh

Dhaka Tribune

Wednesday 28 February 2018

Nasima Begum ndc, secretary, ministry of women and children affairs, welcomed the Green Climate Fund Board’s approval. She said: “The Government of Bangladesh is committed to tackling climate change in the context of its overall development framework and its goals under Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development. “This newly approved project contributes towards priorities outlined in Bangladesh’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC’s) and climate change strategies, including its Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan and existing Climate Change Gender Action Plan.”

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Endangered species of birds in focus of UNDP-GEF conservation project in Belarus

Belarus News

Wednesday 28 February 2018

A big environmental project aimed at restoring the habitats of globally threatened species (Aquatic warbler, greater spotted eagle, great snipe, black-tailed godwits) and the conservation-oriented management of forest and wetland ecosystems is underway in Belarus, BelTA has learned. The five-year UNDP-GEF project “Conservation-oriented management of forests and wetlands to achieve multiple benefits” (Wetlands) started in November last year. All this time the stakeholders were engaged in preparatory work. On 27 February Minsk played host to the initial workshop that brought together the partners and stakeholders. The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection is the national executing agency. The donors are the Global Environment Facility, the United Nations Development Programme. The total budget of the project is $4.3 million. The main objective is to introduce conservation-centered and financially self-sufficient approaches to management of forests and wetlands that will yield conservation effect for the globally significant biodiversity, climate and land use, said Nikolai Svidinsky, the head of the department of biological and landscape diversity at the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection. Sustainable use of resources is very important for the balance of environmental and economic interests, he noted. “Forest and wetland ecosystems of Belarus are of global importance for unique biodiversity. The conservation of these ecosystems is important for reducing the rate of biodiversity loss at the global, regional and national levels. The five-year Wetlands program includes a number of interesting projects that do not repeat the previous ones but are based on their results and problematic aspects,” Nikolai Svidinsky said. Some activities will be implemented in synergy with similar initiatives in Europe Project Manager Aleksei Artyushevsky explained that the project provides for some changes to the environmental legislation (including the long-awaited law on protection and use of wetlands), conservation of valuable tracts of forests, implementation of sustainable methods to the use and processing of peatland biomass, the improvement of forage lands for the free-roaming micro-population of the European bison, restoring the habitats for wetland birds, wetlands and grasslands, ecotourism development and so on. The project will cover more than a dozen of protected natural areas: Turov Lug and Pogost, Nalibokskaya Pushcha, Zvanets and Sporovsky, Zhada, Servech and others.

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Over $80 million approved for climate initiatives in Bangladesh, Georgia and Zambia

UNDP

Wednesday 28 February 2018

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) approved three new climate change adaptation project proposals developed through interagency partnerships led by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in its board meeting this week.

The proposals mobilize more than US$80 million in funding from the GCF for climate resilience initiatives in Bangladesh, Georgia and Zambia. With co-financing agreements in place that leverage resources from national governments, UNDP and other sectors, the projects will catalyze more than US$239 million toward climate resilience efforts in these three nations.

In Bangladesh, the new project will provide assistance to 25,000 women and girls to adopt resilient livelihoods, while ensuring reliable, safe drinking water for 130,000 people through community-managed rainwater harvesting solutions.

In Georgia, the project will scale-up early warning systems and climate information services to protect lives from fast-acting floods and insulate the nation from the economic shocks that changes in climate patterns can bring.

In Zambia, a country where climate impacts threaten to derail efforts to reduce hunger, malnutrition and poverty, the new GCF-financed project will support nearly 1 million farmers in building more climate resilient lives.

The projects, implemented by their respective governments, will be supported by the UN System, including UNDP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

“By supporting countries to mobilize partnerships between the Green Climate Fund, important sectors of civil society, and the broader UN System, UNDP is serving as a broker to connect vulnerable nations with the resources, capacity and tools they need to build low-carbon climate-resilient development,” notes Adriana Dinu, Director, Global Environmental Finance, UNDP. “This will facilitate efforts to achieve climate commitments under the Paris Agreement, as well as make progress against the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction and the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.”

With the approval of the three new projects, UNDP has supported a total of 17 countries to access more than US$500 million in GCF finance for full-sized climate change projects. Since the GCF’s inception, UNDP has received more than 80 formal requests from Nationally Designated Authorities to support the development of funding proposals, and to provide readiness and preparatory support as a delivery partner. To date, 21 Readiness and National Adaptation Plans proposals supported by UNDP have been approved by the Executive Director of the GCF Secretariat, totaling US$11 million in additional support for climate change adaptation planning for 17 countries worldwide.

“The approved projects touch on issues related to food security, access to water, and resilient infrastructure,” said Pradeep Kurukulasuriya, the Head of Climate Change Adaptation, UNDP. “This is a clear demonstration that climate action is critical to advancing and securing development gains.”

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Bangladesh to empower women and girls in the face of increasing climate impacts

ReliefWeb

Wednesday 28 February 2018

The world's largest multilateral fund for climate change action, the Green Climate Fund, has approved almost US$25 million in grant funding in support of Bangladesh’s efforts to build the adaptive capacities of vulnerable coastal communities. With a focus on women and adolescent girls, a new 6-year project is set to benefit 700,000 people living in disaster-prone southwestern districts.

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'Empowering women': UNDP appoints mountaineer Samina Baig as National Goodwill Ambassador

Dunya News

Tuesday 27 February 2018

UNDP has appointed Pakistan’s mountaineer, Samina Baig, as the new National Goodwill Ambassador for Pakistan. As a goodwill ambassador, Baig will be leading efforts to build awareness around climate change, environmental protection, sustainable development goals and women rights. The United Nations Resident Coordinator in Pakistan, Neil Buhne, said “Pakistan is amongst the most vulnerable countries in the world to climate change. Preparing for its effects, and instituting environmental protections, will safeguard economic development for future generations... Empowering women to play their full role in society is not only an ethical imperative, it is essential for sustainable development."

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Feria de Conocimientos sobre el cambio climático

Adelante Cuba

Monday 26 February 2018

Las experiencias de la comunidad de La Gloria, en el municipio Sierra de Cubitas, sobre tareas aplicadas con la agro ecología y sus enfrentamientos a las secuelas del huracán Irma, así como la llegada desde la cooperativa campesina Manuel Fajardo, en el valle de Viñales, Pinar del Río, de los resultados en el desarrollo productivo a partir del uso de abonos orgánicos, fueron dos atractivos temas expuestos este viernes durante la jornada clausura de la Feria de Conocimientos convocada por el Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), la cual sesionó en el Jardín Botánico de la ciudad de Camagüey con la participación de campesinos, especialistas ambientalistas e investigadores del sector agropecuario del país en diferentes ramas productivas. Las alternativas agro ecológicas en La Gloria, potenciadas a través de sus recursos locales con el respaldo del Programa de Pequeñas Donaciones. El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo ha dado posibilidades para rehabilitar suelos con aplicaciones técnicas en el manejo sostenible de la tierra, y una inteligente estrategia ante las variantes del cambio climático en desarrollo. La representación en el cónclave del campesinado de Viñales, en especial los productores de hortalizas y piñas, aprovechando recursos de la propia tierra reseñaron en cifras la producción alcanzada en diversidad renglones que han permitido también ampliar las fuentes de empleo del entorno. “La reducción de riesgos de desastres y la adaptación al cambio climático; visión integradora para la sostenibilidad local”, conferencia dictada por el MS. c. Roberto Pérez de los Reyes, asesor de la Agencia del Medio Ambiente, del Ministerio de la Ciencia, Tecnología y Medio Ambiente, y el taller “La ciencia y la innovación en la gestión de los proyectos comunitarios”, dieron paso a los intercambios de experiencias de esfuerzos ante el cambio climático y las oportunidades para implementar la Tarea Vida a través de aplicaciones prácticas agro ecológicas sostenibles; la exención del agro turismo, transferencias tecnológicas para el uso de las fuentes renovables de energía y la introducción de nuevas alternativas económicas para pequeñas comunidades.

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Jefes de Gobierno del Caribe buscan en Haití una comunidad resiliente a los ciclones

Aguas Digital

Monday 26 February 2018

Lograr construir y formar una comunidad del Caribe más resiliente a los efectos del clima, tras la devastadora temporada de huracanes del 2017 en la zona, será uno de los temas a tratar por los jefes de Gobierno del Caricom que se reunirán esta semana en Haití en su XXIX sesión interanual. Los dirigentes se reunirán este lunes y martes en Puerto Príncipe (Haití), ya que su presidente, Jovenel Moise, es el responsable de turno del Caricom. Su mandato comenzó el uno de enero de 2018 y durará seis meses. Los huracanes Irma y María arrasaron varios países miembros del Caricom en septiembre de 2017, dejando una estela de muertes, destrucción y graves destrozos a las infraestructuras, provocando un retraso en el desarrollo económico en muchos de ellos. Tal y como recordó hoy en un comunicado la Caricom, Dominica y Barbuda fueron diezmados por los ciclones mientras que Anguila y las Islas Vírgenes británicas, quedaron también deshechas. Las Bahamas y las islas de Turcos y Caicos se vieron seriamente afectadas por los dos ciclones, mientras que la propia Haití y St. Kitts y Nevis también padecieron graves daños. Desde entonces, recordó, Caricom con su Agencia de Gestión de Emergencias y Desastres de Caribe (CDEMA, en inglés), con sede en Barbados, al frente, ha estado ayudando a estas naciones en sus labores de reconstrucción. Los esfuerzos no se quedaron sólo en eso y junto al Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) llevó a cabo una conferencia para la reconstrucción del área, en noviembre del año pasado en Nueva York. Sin embargo, según recordó la Caricom la región "aún" necesita "niveles significativos" de financiación para la recuperación y erigir edificios con alta resiliencia a huracanes. "A apenas tres meses de la próxima temporada de huracanes, que comienza en junio, se prevé que en el encuentro que se inicia mañana en Haití, los jefes de gobierno también estudien y analicen medidas para asegurar y garantizar una buena preparación, a la vez que buscan otras para facilitar respuestas eficaces y rápidas a las necesidades que surgen tras cualquier emergencia" como, entre otros, un ciclón.

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UNDP, GFLAC Urge Better Monitoring of Climate Change Spending

IISD

Thursday 22 February 2018

A joint study by UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Latin American and Caribbean Climate Finance Group (GFLAC) tracked financial flows for action on climate change, finding a lack of international funding for climate adaptation efforts. The study analyzed climate change finance in six countries, and showed that more funds have been directed toward mitigation efforts than adaptation.

The two organizations are calling for better monitoring of climate change spending, to ensure that it is directed toward achieving the Paris Agreement on climate change and the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development. Sandra Guzmán, GFLAC, noted that multilateral funds such as the Adaptation Fund, the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) have directed most climate change funding towards mitigation efforts, although many developing countries are experiencing social and economic losses that require “immediate adaptive responses.”

The report outlines recommendations for countries and multilateral organizations. At the national level, the authors urge countries to adopt integrated approaches to planning and budgeting in relation to climate finance, noting that, out of the study sample, only Colombia and the Philippines have done so. They recommend identifying specific financial needs as a basis for connecting with the relevant financing, and strengthening institutional arrangements for monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of climate finance. The other countries involved in the study were Guatemala, Kenya, Nepal and Zambia.

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A Review of Domestic Data Sources for Climate Finance Flows in Recipient Countries

ReliefWeb

Tuesday 20 February 2018

Improved national financial monitoring systems will increase accountability on climate change spending and foster transparency for global efforts to reach the goals outlined through the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, according to a joint study issued today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Latin American and Caribbean Climate Finance Group (GFLAC).

“Climate finance data is key to measuring and reporting on how we are responding to the risks of climate change and building more climate resilient lives and livelihoods across the globe. Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time, improving national financial monitoring systems will be essential in providing reliable, transparent and accountable reporting on global investments to reach our global goals for low-carbon climate-resilient development," said Rohini Kohli, UNDP Lead on National Adaptation Plans, Global Environmental Finance Unit.

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UNDP Praises Cuba's Work in Protecting Biological Diversity

Prensa Latina

Monday 19 February 2018

Edith Felipe, coordinator of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in Cuba, praised here the work of Cuba in the protection and conservation of biological diversity, an issue in which important steps are taken. Felipe told the Prensa Latina news agency, after the opening ceremony of the workshop of the 6th National Report on the Convention on Biological Diversity, that Cuba is a pioneer country in taking steps in this field, while developing an approach on ecosystem management. She said that, in fact, the way these various issues are managed becomes an important measure for adapting to climate change. For Felipe, there are many examples in Cuba in this regard, both in the ocean and soil, such as the southern archipelagos and the northern protected area Sabana-Camaguey, which manage conservation of ecosystems by linking production and services to the community. She also highlighted the conservation work on the southwestern shore with the reforestation in the mangrove swamp, outlined to limit the rise in sea level across the areas most jeopardized by the surge of the sea. This approach based on ecosystems is probably one of the key actions we develop here, said Felipe referring to the workshop that begins today, to prepare the 6th National Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Biological Diversity for 2020.

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We need an Olympic effort on climate change

Eco Business

Wednesday 14 February 2018

The Olympics gives us a chance to re-affirm our commitment to protect our people and our planet, says UNDP climate change adaptation expert Pradeep Kurukulasuriya. The Olympics offers us a time of hope, a time for mutual understanding, a time for goodwill and peace. But as all eyes turn toward Pyeongchang for the 23rd Winter Olympic Games, rising temperatures, melting glaciers and rising seas threaten to dash many of these lofty hopes and dreams. Just as world leaders got together in 1992 to re-affirm an Olympic Truce through the United Nations, these Olympic Games offer us the real opportunity to affirm the real risks of climate change and the real steps we will need to take – as individuals, as communities and as nations – to protect our people and planet. Originally published on Thomson Reuters.

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The ancient hairstyle of Set Set Yo, Myanmar

Myanmore

Tuesday 13 February 2018

A village near Bagan, known for keeping alive a millenia-old hairstyle, is battling climate change and food shortages. Producing crops such as pigeon pea, groundnut and sesame, the village is a recipient of the UNDP’s Adaptation Fund project, “Addressing Climate Change Risks on Water Resource and Food Security in the Dry Zone of Myanmar" (started in February 2015, is in partnership with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation). In the last 10 years, the village has suffered the effects of climate change. Shorter monsoon seasons with erratic rainfall patterns, high intensity rainfall with flash floods, and extreme temperatures producing drought spells have affected the village’s economy.

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Improving impact evaluation to foster climate resilient development in Zambia

ReliefWeb

Tuesday 13 February 2018

By improving the capacity of its ministries to monitor and evaluate the impact of climate change actions, the Government of Zambia is ramping up its efforts to plan for low-carbon, climate-resilient development, and reach global goals for poverty reduction, food security and climate action outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

In a recent capacity building workshop, provided through the joint FAO-UNDP Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans Programme (NAP-Ag) on 4 to 7 December 2017 in Siavonga, representatives from Zambia’s Ministry of Agriculture worked with leading global experts to improve capacity on Impact Evaluation techniques.

“Impact Evaluation assesses the changes in the well-being of individuals that can be attributed to a particular project, programme or policy,” said Stanislaus Chisakuta, Deputy Director, Technical Services Branch, Ministry of Agriculture.

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¿Por qué debemos proteger los manglares en Cuba?

Cuba Debate

Monday 12 February 2018

Cerca del 20 por ciento del área boscosa del país está constituida por manglares. Estos ecosistemas a su vez están presente en el cinco por ciento de la línea costera nacional y poseen gran relevancia al constituir una barrera natural contra los huracanes, el ascenso del nivel del mar, y el avance de la salinidad hacia los acuíferos y las tierras de cultivo. Sobre este importante tema, especialistas y directivos del Ministerio de Ciencia Tecnología y Media Ambiente (CITMA) debatieron en la emisión de este jueves de la Mesa Redonda. El M.Sc. José Manuel Guzmán Menéndez, Director técnico e investigador auxiliar del Instituto de Ecología y Sistemática del CITMA explicó que junto con los bosques de ciénaga constituyen los principales humedales que permiten la sostenibilidad de la vida en la zona costera. “Los manglares por mucho tiempo se consideraron bosques inservibles y por esta razón fueron desbastados sobre todo antes del triunfo de la Revolución, cuando su explotación era intensiva por parte de los carboneros”. No obstante, resaltó que la nación está a la cabeza de la conservación de este recurso natural en la región caribeña, gracias a que desde la década del 70 del siglo pasado comenzaron las primeras investigaciones sobre este tema en la Mayor de las Antillas. “Los manglares albergan una biodiversidad extraordinaria pues son hogar de aves costeras y es donde desovan especies de vertebrados e invertebrados. Entre las estrategias desplegadas por el Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Medio Ambiente (Citma) para la adaptación al cambio climático y recogidas en la Tarea Vida, la recuperación de este recurso natural ocupa los primeros escaños de la lista”, acotó el directivo.

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Youths are the future of climate resilience

Fiji Times

Sunday 11 February 2018

Feburary 11, 2018 - Suva, Fiji. When the vulnerability of small island countries to climate change is reported in international media, it is often accompanied by images of houses and roads inundated with seawater, families standing among ruined homes, and children barefoot among wind-blown palm trees. People are often portrayed as victims at the mercy of the elements. It can be an easy narrative to fall into — communicating climate change is complex and multifaceted. Yet it is far from the full picture. And it fails both the subjects of the stories and the readers. As well as addressing the impacts and causes of climate change, we need to look to the solutions. How are communities going to, not just adapt, but build their resilience? What does resilience even mean? And how do we do it? Key to meeting the challenges will be youth.

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Tuvalu scholarships awarded under Green Climate Fund-financed project

Radio New Zealand

Thursday 8 February 2018

February 8, 2018. Two students from Tuvalu have been granted university scholarships under the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project. The project focuses on building coastal resilience in three of Tuvalu's nine inhabited islands and is funded by the Green Climate Fund. Investing in young people is among the country's environmental adaptation plans. "At the moment we only selected the civil engineering with some coastal background for one of the students to take and the other scholarship award is the Bachelor of Science in geospatial science", said manager of the Funafuti based project, Moeo Finauga. Finauga said the students would be offered jobs on the project once they had completed their studies.

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Córdoba y Sucre se unen para preservación de humedales en La Mojana

El Universal Colombia

Monday 5 February 2018

Las comunidades de Córdoba y de Sucre se unieron para adelantar estrategias que permitan la conservación de los humedales, especialmente en La Mojana, sitio en el que habitan miles de aves. Un grupo de 28 personas de 18 comunidades de ambos departamentos se dieron cita en la zona de La Mojana para adelantar una jornada de avistamiento de aves, con el objeto de sensibilizarlos sobre la importancia de los humedales, como hábitat de numerosas especies de pájaros y promover la adopción de medidas de adaptación al cambio climático que aseguren la conservación del humedal y el bienestar de las comunidades locales. La actividad estuvo enmarcada en el trabajo del proyecto “Reducción del riesgo y la vulnerabilidad frente al cambio climático en la región de la Depresión Momposina en Colombia” implementado por el Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo, PNUD, en alianza con el Fondo Adaptación, el IDEAM y el Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander Von Humboldt. El avistamiento se llevó a cabo en el marco de la celebración del día internacional de los humedales, con el cual se conmemora la firma del único acuerdo multilateral ambiental dedicado a la conservación de estos ecosistemas: la Convención sobre los humedales de importancia internacional, especialmente como hábitat de aves acuáticas; conocida también como Convenio Ramsar1. Los asistentes al taller coincidieron en que nunca habían tenido la oportunidad de salir a explorar y escuchar el canto de las aves, conocer su nombre científico y detenerse en datos relacionados con sus características, los lugares donde viven y su entorno. Por su parte, Wendy López, bióloga del PNUD, dijo que la actividad ornitológica está incrementándose en el país con la participación creciente de estudiantes, instituciones, comunidades locales y organizaciones ornitológicas regionales que trabajan activamente en la visibilización, investigación y conservación de las aves, actividad que a largo plazo será fundamental para la conservación del humedal y sus aves.

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ZCFU revises projected agric growth rate

The Herald Zimbabwe

Monday 5 February 2018

The Zimbabwe Commercial Farmers Union (ZCFU) has revised its projected agriculture growth rate to 8 percent from 15,7 percent on the back of anticipated negative impact of the late onset of the rainy season. ZCFU said late start to the 2017/18 rainy season had affected the crop situation across the country hence the agriculture sector would not achieve initially projected growth and performance. In his 2018 National Budget Finance and Economic Planning Minister Patrick Chinamasa projected agriculture to grow by 15,9 percent in 2017, on the back of coordinated Government interventions and private sector initiatives. The extension of Command Agriculture Programme to include soya beans and livestock is expected to sustain the growth. However, ZCFU president Wonder Chabikwa indicated the late onset of the rain season, which resulted in crops wilting in many parts of the country posed a threat to the sector, the backbone of the economy. “Projected agriculture sector growth at 15,7 percent – before the dry conditions – revised to 8 percent on backdrop of wilting crops,” said Mr Chabikwa in a presentation at the Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) 2018 economic outlook symposium. Overall, the economy is projected to grow by 4,5 percent. Mr Chabikwa however highlighted weather patterns had bearing on the performance of the agriculture sector and ultimately the entire economy. The country expects normal to below normal rainfall with drought risk high in some parts of the country. Already, climate change is affecting the small holder farmers who are mostly not insured, despite being major contributors, especially tobacco and grain producers. “The optimal planting window passed without meaningful rains reducing yields. The country is also utilising 50 percent of established irrigation,” he said. ZEC warns against political violence Re-engagement a critical plinth for Zim ZCFU revises projected agric growth rate February 5, 2018 Business Mr Chabikwa Mr Chabikwa Business Reporter The Zimbabwe Commercial Farmers Union (ZCFU) has revised its projected agriculture growth rate to 8 percent from 15,7 percent on the back of anticipated negative impact of the late onset of the rainy season. ZCFU said late start to the 2017/18 rainy season had affected the crop situation across the country hence the agriculture sector would not achieve initially projected growth and performance. In his 2018 National Budget Finance and Economic Planning Minister Patrick Chinamasa projected agriculture to grow by 15,9 percent in 2017, on the back of coordinated Government interventions and private sector initiatives. The extension of Command Agriculture Programme to include soya beans and livestock is expected to sustain the growth. However, ZCFU president Wonder Chabikwa indicated the late onset of the rain season, which resulted in crops wilting in many parts of the country posed a threat to the sector, the backbone of the economy. “Projected agriculture sector growth at 15,7 percent – before the dry conditions – revised to 8 percent on backdrop of wilting crops,” said Mr Chabikwa in a presentation at the Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) 2018 economic outlook symposium. Overall, the economy is projected to grow by 4,5 percent. Mr Chabikwa however highlighted weather patterns had bearing on the performance of the agriculture sector and ultimately the entire economy. The country expects normal to below normal rainfall with drought risk high in some parts of the country. Already, climate change is affecting the small holder farmers who are mostly not insured, despite being major contributors, especially tobacco and grain producers. “The optimal planting window passed without meaningful rains reducing yields. The country is also utilising 50 percent of established irrigation,” he said. He highlighted the need for Government to address climate change at national level with aim to build resilience and implement National Adaptation Plans (NAP) to cushion farmers from the excessive effects of climate change on crop production. Additionally, despite the high drought risk that will affect output, Mr Chabikwa said there was also need to curb unnecessary imports of agriculture products to save the much needed foreign currency.

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Nepal's climate to get warmer and wetter

The Kathmandu Post

Monday 5 February 2018

The average annual precipitation may increase in both the short-term and long-term period by 2-6 per cent and 8-12 per cent respectively, the report predicts. The Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DoHM) and the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development’s (Icimod) carried out the joint study. Their experts analysed climate change data for the medium- term period (2016-2045) and long-term period (2036-2065). The study forms technical support to the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process. Icimod Water and Climate Specialist Santosh Nepal says, “Temperature related parameters show significant increase as the report suggests. “Based on this study, Nepal’s future climate would be more challenging. There will be an upsurge in extreme precipitation and temperature,” says Nepal. The researchers considered 1981-2010 as the reference period for the study. They took two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) - RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 - as representations of extreme future scenarios in the country. The RCPs are four greenhouse gas concentration trajectories designed to support research on impacts of climate change. They predict climate future, which means the amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) in four different periods in future. Under the RCP 4.5, the GHG emissions will rise around 2040 and then decline. Likewise, emissions continue to rise throughout the 21st century in RCP 8.5. The study estimates both the average annual mean temperature and average annual rainfall will see a continuous surge up to the end of the century. Rainfall may increase by 11-23 per cent, whereas the temperature will go up by 1.72-3.58 degree Celsius in the period. While the study predicts temperature increase for all seasons, the highest rise in mean temperature of 1.3-1.4 degree Celsius (medium-term period) and 1.8-2.4 degree Celsius (long-term period) may be seen post-monsoon. Rainfall may decrease during the pre-monsoon season by 4-5 per cent in the medium-term period, but will continue to rise rest of the season. The post-monsoon season will experience the highest increase in rainfall 6-19 per cent (middle-term period) and 19-20 per cent in (long-term period). Such abnormal changes in the climate may trigger extreme events related to temperature and rainfall. “We already have too much water during the monsoon season. We do not have enough catchment areas. Imagine what level of havoc additional rainfall could cause. Excess rainfall would cause floods and landslides and damage property,” says Nepal.

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Potential Renewed Growth: 4 Major Development Projects in Vanuatu

Borgen Magazine

Sunday 4 February 2018

Febuary 4, 2018 - Port Vila, Vanuatu. As in all nations of the Pacific Islands, development projects in Vanuatu must address the current and impending effects of climate change. The Vanuatu Coastal Adaptation Project (VCAP), through the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Climate Change Adaptation initiative, works to implement adaptive strategies and resilience to the effects of rising sea level – indeed, projections estimate a rise of 20 centimeters by 2050. Programs for strengthening early warning systems and for integrating water resource and coastal management are developed to aid in national policy reform, increased knowledge, agricultural resilience and, of course, saving lives. The project also incorporates rehabilitation of coastal ecosystems like mangroves, coral reefs and fisheries.

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Toolkit - National adaptation plans: Building climate resilience in agriculture

PreventionWeb

Thursday 1 February 2018

This toolkit is comprised of videos, lecture notes and ongoing conversations from the massive open online course (MOOC) on National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture.

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