Climate Change Adaptation in the News

March 2018

March 2018

Finding Nature based Solutions to Treat Drinking Water to support Farmers in Sri Lanka’s Dry Zone

Lankapuvath - National News Agency of Sri Lanka

Thursday 29 March 2018

With the theme for World Water Day 2018 “Nature for Water”, Lankapuvath hihglights the UNDP-supported project ‘Climate Resilient Integrated Water Management Project (CRIWMP)’ as an example of an initiative using nature-based solutions to address water issues. The 7-year project is set to improve irrigation of water tanks in the Northern, Eastern, North Western and North Central Provinces of Sri Lanka by investing in improving community irrigation water infrastructure, scaling-up decentralized drinking water systems, and strengthening early weather warnings, flood-response, and water management. To support water purification under this programme, a Trade Fair on Advanced and Appropriate Water Treatment Systems was held at the Red Verandah, BMICH. Nine companies showcased nature-based solutions, in parallel with alternative approaches, in water treatment technologies and practices.

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Leveraging next-generation technologies, the Government of Liberia taps the private sector to build effective climate information and early warning systems.

ReliefWeb

Friday 23 March 2018

With the numerous challenges and resource constraints that Liberia faces, traditional hydrometeorological systems like those deployed in developed countries are too expensive, too hard to service, and too difficult to maintain.

Rather than invest in this type of system, the Government of Liberia decided to take a bold step to leapfrog technologies by leveraging easy-to-deploy automatic weather stations, partnerships with telecommunications companies, and innovative public-private partnerships with climate service providers.

Working with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on a project to “Strengthen climate information services to enhance resilient development,” the Government of Liberia has deployed 11 automatic weather stations (AWS), 6 agrometeorology stations, a lightning detection system, hydrological software that will provide for integrated water resource management, and a hydrological early warning system that has been installed and will begin issuing alerts in 2018. The project was supported through a UNDP programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) and funded through the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund (GEF-LDCF).

The project has also set up a public information website providing hourly and 10-day forecasts for all the cities of Liberia.

Given that at the start of the project, Liberia had limited weather monitoring capabilities and no early warning systems, this is a significant achievement in a nation working hard to redefine itself in the 21st Century.

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Government of Liberia launches project to prioritize climate governance through improved National Adaptation Plans

ReliefWeb

Thursday 22 March 2018

Africa’s first Green Climate Fund-financed project to support National Adaptation Plans was launched in Liberia earlier this month. The National Adaptation Plans project kicked off on 12 March in Monrovia and benefits from US$2.3 million in financing from the Green Climate Fund (GCF). This two-year project will help Liberia accelerate its National Adaptation Plan (NAP) by investing in climate-sensitive sectors, like agriculture and fisheries. “The strategic priorities of the National Adaptation Plan are to mainstream climate change adaptation into development policies, plans and strategies; build long-term capacities of institutional structures involved in NAPs; implement effective and sustainable funding mechanisms, advance research and development in climate change adaptation, and improve knowledge management,” said Nathaniel T. Blama, Sr., Executive Director of the Liberia Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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UK Injects £21.5m into Zimbabwe’s Resilience Building Fund

UNDP

Wednesday 21 March 2018

The UK Department of International Development (DFID) announced today a £21.5 million grant to the Zimbabwe Resilience Building Fund (ZRBF), which seeks to contribute to increased capacities of vulnerable rural communities to withstand shocks and stresses, ultimately leading to a reduced need for humanitarian responses and an improvement in their well-being. In a signing ceremony held with UNDP at the UN office grounds in Harare, Ms. Annabel Gerry, Head of DFID in Zimbabwe said, “Climate change is already evident here – this year we’ve been experiencing hotter days and higher frequency of dry spells during the rainy season. Without adapting - poverty, food insecurity, malnutrition, and environmental degradation will continue to be serious challenges in Zimbabwe, particularly in rural areas – adding to the existing difficulties of the estimated one million Zimbabweans who are currently chronically food insecure.” “Over 120,000 people have been supported to cope with the effect of climate change through various interventions and ZRBF gives us a unique opportunity to push forward the resilience building agenda in Zimbabwe, which as the break between rains this season has reminded us, remains a huge challenge but also an opportunity for the country”.

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Projects Build Climate Resilience through Climate Information Services, Sustainable Agriculture

IISD

Tuesday 20 March 2018

The Gambia launched a project on ‘Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans,’ seeking to prepare its agricultural sector for the impacts of climate change, and support low-carbon, climate-resilient development. Supported through the joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO)-UNDP Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans Programme (NAP-Ag), the project makes the Gambia the 11th country to join the multi-agency support programme, financed by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) through its International Climate Initiative (IKI).

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Georgia Enhances Environmental Oversight with EU, UNDP

Georgia Today

Tuesday 20 March 2018

The Parliamentary Committee on Environmental Protection and Natural Resources has published a plan of action to enhance Georgia’s oversight on environmental issues. With the assistance of the European Union (EU) and United Nations Development Program (UNDP), they plan is set to last from 2018-32, and focuses on Parliament’s crucial role in addressing the issues apparent in the country and how they can be addressed. “The environmental agenda is fundamental for Georgia’s progress in many areas, including economic growth and international relations. The country has undertaken very real environmental commitments under the Association Agreement with the European Union and the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Parliament, through its law-making and oversight work, and communication with citizens, will contribute to the successful fulfilment of these obligations,” said Kakha Kuchava, Chairperson of the committee. The plan outlines goals, objectives and actions related to the environmental legislation set out with EU standards. Included are also mediation with relevant stakeholders and an oversight of the Government’s work. Attention is directed to transparent and responsible communication with the public, considering Georgia’s Open Government Partnership and Open Parliament. Additionally, the committee plans to work on some pressing environmental problems, such as air pollution.

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Malawians welcome China-funded disaster risk reduction projects

Xinhua News

Monday 19 March 2018

Malawian residents and analysts on Saturday welcomed a cluster of China-funded projects aimed at helping their disaster-prone areas build resilience and reduce the effects of disasters. China on Friday handed over the projects to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in a disaster-prone area of central Malawi's Salima district, about 93 km from the capital Lilongwe. The handover ceremony was attended by UNDP Resident Coordinator Maria Jose Torres, Chinese Ambassador to Malawi Wang Shiting, and Clement Chintu Phiri, secretary to Malawi's vice president and commissioner for Disaster Management Affairs. Launched in June 2016, the Disaster Risk Reduction Small Grants Scheme was supporting poor and vulnerable communities in 15 identified disaster-prone districts and were trilateral pilot projects being undertaken by the Malawian government, with the technical and financial support of the Chinese government and the UNDP.

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Supporting ‘all-inclusive nation-building’ in the Gambia

The Point Gambia

Monday 19 March 2018

In an effort to prepare its agricultural sector for the impacts of climate change and support low-carbon, climate-resilient development, the Government of the Gambia launched a new project on Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans this month. Joining existing planning efforts in the country to ameliorate the future impacts of climate change on agricultural sectors, the project is supported through the joint FAO-UNDP Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans Programme (NAP-Ag). Gambia is the 11th country to join the multi-agency support programme financed by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), through its International Climate Initiative (IKI). The Gambia NAP-Ag Project was officially launched with a one-day inception workshop on 6 March attended by 84 representatives of key agricultural sectors – including livestock and fisheries, planning, finance, environment and water resources agencies, as well as educational institutions and civil society organizations.

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US$6.45M GoJ/UN Project to Be Implemented In Kingston and Clarendon

Jamaica Information Service

Monday 19 March 2018

The standard of living of 43,000 residents of Northern Clarendon and Western Kingston is expected to significantly improve under a US$6.45 million project to be jointly implemented over the next three years by several United Nations (UN) agencies in partnership with the Government of Jamaica and civil society. The project, dubbed “Strengthening Human Resilience in Northern Clarendon and West Kingston”, is the first such being implemented, and will focus on building resilience in several areas based on extensive assessments of challenges in the targeted communities. These include: limited access to clean and potable water; the inability to effectively mitigate climate change and natural hazards; persistent poverty; and lack of access to social services, which the UN has identified as foremost threats to the residents’ welfare. Consequently, the initiative is tailored to strengthen local and community governance bodies, with youth participation being incorporated to design and oversee interventions; and enhance economic, food and nutritional security by creating a climate-resilient agriculture sector and diversified local economy. It also aims to improve environmental, health and water security to safeguard communities against preventable illnesses such as waterborne and sanitation-related diseases and ensure efficient and sustainable use of natural resources; and strengthen the institutional capacities of the Government and community stakeholders to mainstream the human security approach in Jamaica’s development strategies.

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Cheers as Nyanyadzi irrigation rehab boosts output

The Herald Zimbabwe

Monday 19 March 2018

Widow Dorcas Jena has lived off farming at the Nyanyadzi Irrigation Scheme of Chimanimani in eastern Zimbabwe since 1976 when she was married, growing mostly the maize staple on her one acre plot. And until 18 years ago when a tropical cyclone called Eline cluttered irrigation canals, a storage dam and the river systems that support the scheme with sediment, the 59-year old had often enjoyed bountiful harvests, booking in nearly 3 000kg of maize each year, on the average. But production has declined in successive years, falling to just 750kg at the end of 2016, as water shortages resulting from heavy siltation took their toll. Hunger soon followed. “Whenever we received heavy rains, my crops would be swept away and those that remained would be affected by water logging and that greatly depressed my crop yields,” lamented Jena, who looks after her 3 grandchildren and a son. A $3.98 million project to scale up climate change adaptation has carried out massive restoration works at Nyanyadzi, a gravity-fed irrigation system, helping farmers in one of Zimbabwe’s driest, drought-prone regions cope with changing climates .The programme, which began in 2014 and ending in October this year, is being implemented at different scales across three districts vulnerable to climate change – Buhera, Chimanimani and Chiredzi – by global charity Oxfam in partnership with SAFIRE, University of Zimbabwe and Government. It is jointly funded by the UNDP and the Global Environment Facility.

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Government, Partners Launch National Adaptation Plan of Liberia

Front Page Africa

Friday 16 March 2018

The National Adaptation Plan (NPA) is funded by the Green Climate Fund (GCF) created to support the effort of developing countries to response to the challenge of climate change in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement. The project was launched at the National Adaption Plans Inception workshop implemented by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the National Climate Change Secretariat March 12 at a local hotel in Monrovia. Outlining the NAP’s priorities at the launch, the EPA’s new Executive Director, Nathaniel T. Blama, Sr. noted that Liberia is the first country that have started the implementation of NAP; even though the country received approval alongside the Republic of Nepal. “The strategic priorities of the NAP are to mainstream climate change adaptation into development policies, plans and strategies; build long-term capacities of institutional structures involved in NAP; implement effective and sustainable funding mechanisms, advance research and development in climate change adaptation, and improve knowledge management” he said.

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Guinée: Le PNUD offre des matériels météorologiques, de kits informatiques, des engins roulants à deux ministères

Aminata

Monday 12 March 2018

Le programme des nations unies pour le développement (PNUD) a procédé ce Vendredi 09 Mars 2018 à la remise d’un important lot de matériels météorologiques, de kits informatiques (ordinateurs et accessoires) et des engins roulants acquis au Ministère de l’Environnement, des Eaux et Forêts et au Ministère des Transports. Selon le PNUD, ce don s’inscrit dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre du projet Renforcement de la Résilience des Moyens d’existence des Communautés agricoles de Gaoual, Koundara et Mali- REMECC GKM, du projet Adaptation basée sur les Ecosystèmes des communautés vulnérables de la Région de la Haute Guinée-AbE-HG et du projet BIOGAZ. Aux dires des responsables du PNUD, ce lot d’équipements obtenu grâce aux financements du Fonds Mondial pour l’Environnement (FEM) et du (PNUD) vise à renforcer la résilience et la capacité d’adaptation des communautés au changement climatique et promouvoir le développement du Biogaz.

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In Korea, but not for Olympics

Daily Mail

Monday 12 March 2018

The GCF approved a combined total of US$84.5 million for two Zambian project proposals in agriculture and energy that Zambia submitted. The agriculture project developed by the Ministry of Agriculture and supported by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) got a US$32 million GCF approval in funding that triggered an additional US$105,269 million co-financing that will be provided by the UNDP and Government to bring the project aggregate to US$137.269 in total.

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Zimbabwe: From Cow Dung to Electricity - Lives Change for Chiredzi Villagers

All Africa

Monday 12 March 2018

Now, a $4 million project co-funded by the UN Development Programme and the Global Environment Facility is working to end deforestation, and to make farmers in rural Chiredzi energy secure, both as a mitigatory and adaptive measure to climate change.

Titled "Scaling up Adaptation in Zimbabwe, with a focus on rural livelihoods" the four-year project is being implemented by Oxfam in partnership with Plan International, Southern Alliance for Indigenous Resources, University of Zimbabwe and Government across three districts vulnerable to climate change - Buhera, Chiredzi and Chimanimani.

Between November 2014 and October 2018, villagers are bent to action, in partnership with the development agencies, stepping up climate adaptation and mitigation actions such as switching to sustainable energy, reviving and climate proofing irrigation schemes and adopting drought-tolerant crops.

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Vietnam and U.N. to build storm-proof housing for coastal communities

Thomson Reuters

Monday 12 March 2018

Thousands of families on Vietnam's typhoon-battered coast will receive free storm-proof houses, which can help pull them out of poverty, government and United Nations officials said. Vietnam is one of 10 countries most affected by climate change, according to the latest annual Climate Risk Index published by the research organisation Germanwatch. Coastal residents are particularly vulnerable as storms increase in frequency and intensity. They are often trapped in poverty, accumulating debt or spending savings to rebuild or repair their homes, businesses and possessions.

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FAO-UNDP to fight climate change in The Gambia

The Point Gambia

Friday 9 March 2018

The United Nation agencies in The Gambia (Food and Agriculture Organisation –FAO- and United Nations Development Programme –UNDP-) Tuesday launched the National Adaptation Plan to fight climate change through agriculture support. Funded by German Federal Ministry for environment, nature conservation building and nuclear safety, the programme is being implemented in 11 developing countries. Minister of agriculture Omar Jallow said at the launching that Gambia’s economy is thriving on agriculture that has a key role in poverty reduction and food security. “There is a need to intensify production to meet the food demands of the growing population and to reduce greenhouse gases from the agriculture section,” he noted. He said as climate change impacts agriculture, which also hinders rural development, the availability of technical information on emerging risks, vulnerabilities and adaptation to agriculture in the context of ecosystem and landscapes affect developing countries. Minister Jallow said the integration agriculture based adaptation plan requires effective institutional framework that will promote inter-sectoral and national coordination to address climate change that lies within related ministries. “Strengthening technical capacities and intuitions on NAPs in agriculture, environment and planning, finance, meteorological agencies, disaster management authorities and local governments to mainstream climate change risk in the agricultural sector is important.” Mariatou Fatou Njie from FAO declared that agriculture holds successful achieved objectives in the Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement on climate change which, she said plays a crucial role in the livelihood of hundreds of millions of smallholder farmers and rural communities worldwide. Ade Mamanyane Lekoetje, UNDP country representative opined that climate change poses serious challenge to key national economic sectors due to change in rainfall pattern. She said The Gambia has strived in formulating comprehensive transformational adaptation priorities identified in low emissions climate resilient development strategy aiming to integrate climate change related to agriculture-based livelihood within exiting national planning and budgeting processes.

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Building effective climate governance in Liberia

ReliefWeb

Friday 9 March 2018

Climate change poses significant risks to Liberia in reaching its goals for sustainable development and climate action. Strong governance will be a key in building the enabling and transformative institutions necessary to protect the people of Liberia from sea level rise and other climate impacts, propel development gains to reduce hunger and poverty so that no one is left behind, and protect peaceful climate-resilient economic and social development.

Madam Anyaa Vohiri is a climate hero from Liberia. Her work as the Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Agency provides unique insights into how least developed countries can plan for climate change and build for the future.

In advance of the launch of Liberia's new Green Climate Fund-financed project to advance the National Adaptation Plans (NAP) processes for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors, UNDP caught up with Madam Vohiri to discuss the unique challenges and opportunities facing her country.

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Colombian President calls for enhanced public-private climate action

Green Climate Fund

Thursday 8 March 2018

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos Calderón called for urgent public-private sector cooperation in tackling climate change at the Green Climate Fund's first Structured Dialogue in Latin America. "Both the public and private sectors should work together towards developing sustainable solutions that are relevant to each region," said President Santos during the Dialogue, which concludes today. Stressing the need for action, he warned the onset of climate change means the life quality of human beings is at stake. "The more time we take to start acting, the more expensive those actions will be," he said. "When talking about survival of species on the planet, borders don't matter, ideologies or nationalities don't matter; we human beings are all one species. What happens to one, happens to all, and that's why we need to work together. As I have said many times, our town is called the world and our race is called humanity." GCF holds Structured Dialogues in different sectors of the world to share regional knowledge about how to use public investment to address climate change and stimulate private finance, as well as enhancing understanding of the Fund. GCF Executive Director Howard Bamsey told about 170 participants attending the four-day Dialogue that GCF is committed to helping the Latin American region pursue low-emission and climate-resilient development. "Although all countries are different, regional gatherings like this can deliver benefits from exchanges between countries about the many experiences, concerns, challenges and aspirations they share," said Mr Bamsey. "With a diversity of financing instruments and support programmes, the GCF can match the geographic and economic diversity of the region and its resulting spectrum of climate change finance needs." Mr Bamsey confirmed GCF has committed close to USD 736 million in climate finance for Latin America, which in turn represents nearly 2.7 billion in co-financing. GCF's inaugural Structured Dialogue in Latin America has brought together representatives from 19 nations across the region, including government ministers from Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. During a high-level discussion panel, Latin American ministers and deputy ministers said people in the Spanish-speaking region not only use the same language, but share many of the same problems and challenges in the fight against climate change. They highlighted the need for climate finance projects that target individual country needs, while also identifying the important role of the Dialogue in promoting cross-cutting, multi-country and regional investments. GCF Board member Ignacio Lorenzo emphasised GCF's vital role in helping Latin American countries "turn the paper of their NDCs into reality" while speaking on the sidelines of the Dialogue in reference to nations’ individual climate action plans under the Paris Agreement. "While there is a huge geographic variety across the region from big to small countries and ranging from rainforest, to coastal and mountainous areas, the increasing climate impacts of floods and droughts are galvanising calls to action across the region," said Mr Lorenzo, the head of climate change in Uruguay's Ministry of Housing, Land Planning and Environment. Discussions throughout the four days have explored a wide range of climate solutions, including the strengthening of REDD+, enhancing the role of the private sector in climate finance, and seeking innovative ways of incorporating low-carbon development in the region's rapidly expanding cities. GCF will study the results of the Structured Dialogue to further refine its climate finance support at the national and regional levels across Latin America.

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TOPIC: Mainstreaming Gender into Climate Change Adaptation Programmes and Policies

APAN

Thursday 8 March 2018

Thank you to all who contributed in our last Exchange on how to use NAPs, NDCs and the SDGs to advance climate resilience in Asia-Pacific. With the 2018 International Women’s Day taking place this week, I would like to bring our attention to gender and climate change adaptation – in particular, learn from your experiences on what it takes to mainstream gender into climate change adaptation programmes and policies.

Leading this effort is Sibyl Nelson, Gender Advisor (FAO) to the “Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans” Programme, which is jointly implemented by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Based in Rome, Italy, Sibyl has been working on the gender dimensions of climate change adaptation for ten years and is currently supporting eleven countries to mainstream gender into their National Adaptation Plans for the agriculture sectors. Sibyl Nelson, over to you.

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GCF Board Approves over US$1 Billion in Funding for 23 Climate Mitigation and Adaptation Projects

IISD

Thursday 8 March 2018

The approved projects include three adaptation projects developed through UN Development Programme (UNDP)-led partnerships. The projects mobilize more than US$80 million in GCF funding for climate resilience initiatives in Bangladesh, Georgia and Zambia, and are expected to leverage US$239 million from the respective Governments, UNDP and others. In Bangladesh, funding will support efforts to build the adaptive capacities of vulnerable coastal communities by providing assistance to 25,000 women and girls to adopt resilient livelihoods, while ensuring safe drinking water for 130,000 people through community-managed rainwater harvesting solutions. The six-year project will also, inter alia, strengthen women’s participation in the dissemination of gender-responsive early warnings, as well as monitoring of and adaptation to evolving climate risks. In Zambia, nearly one million farmers will be supported through a seven-year project that will: strengthen the farmers’ capacity to plan for climate risks that threaten development gains; promote climate-resilient agricultural production and diversification practices to improve food security and income generation; improve market access; and foster the commercialization of climate-resilient agricultural commodities. The project is aimed at achieving SDGs 1 (no poverty) and 2 (zero hunger), as well as Zambia’s goal of becoming a middle-income country by 2030. In Georgia, a seven-year project on scaling up early warning systems and using climate information will enhance the resilience of 1.7 million people and their livelihoods, helping to buffer against floods, droughts and other climate risks.

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UN and Bangladeshi Government Team Up to Help Women Adapt to Climate Change

Eco Watch

Wednesday 7 March 2018

Bangladesh was No. 6 on the Long Term Climate Risk Index of countries most affected by climate change from 1997 to 2016. The United Nations contents that climate change disproportionately impacts women, since they are more likely to be poor and dependent on local resources. It is hopeful, then, that the UN's Green Climate Fund and Bangladesh's Ministry of Women and Children's Affairs will put $33 million towards helping Bangladeshi women and girls develop livelihoods that can withstand the changing climate, Reuters reported on Monday.

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Supporting climate resilient agriculture in Benin

ReliefWeb

Wednesday 7 March 2018

Climate change has negative impacts on food security and livelihoods in Benin, where 70 percent of the population, especially in rural areas, depend only on agriculture. To reduce the vulnerability of populations towards the negative impacts of climate change, the Government of Benin recently initiated a new project supported through UNDP and financed by the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund on “Sustainable Livelihoods.”

"There is an urgent need to find ways to strengthen the resilience of our populations toward this disruptive phenomenon. Innovative approaches will be needed to help agricultural stakeholders to anticipate and overcome shocks from these adverse effects of climate change and climate variability,” said Mr. Abdoulaye Bio Tchane, Senior Minister in Charge of Planning and Development.

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A new way of working in crisis

UNDP

Wednesday 7 March 2018

In Somalia, a test case for the UN’s commitment to bridging humanitarian and development work.

Mohamed Ismail Yasin travelled 600 km to reach the sand dam near Bandarbeyla, in the Bari region of Somalia. He came with six members of his family and all the livestock they could bring.

“I came from Mayle district,” Mohamed recounts. “We fled from the drought in the region. The livestock that we brought here got pasture, and today we brought them to the water dam to give then water.”

The sand dam is one of the water harvesting structures built by UNDP in partnership with the Global Environment Facility. It aims to reduce the impacts of climate change-induced disasters like droughts and floods.

It’s the nearest dependable water source for Mohamed’s family and for other pastoralists struggling to earn a living against a crippling drought. Poor rainfall over three consecutive seasons has led to widespread crop failure and livestoc