Climate Change Adaptation in the News

April 2018

April 2018

SDG Knowledge Weekly: Adaptation, Agriculture and Food

IISD

Monday 30 April 2018

Also linking agriculture with other SDGs, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN released a set of four briefing notes on achieving countries’ Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement on climate change in tandem with progress on SDGs 2 and 13 (zero hunger and climate action, respectively). The studies are a product of the joint Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) Programme (NAP-Ag), conducted in collaboration with UN Development Programme (UNDP) with support from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMUB).

The first briefing note offers an overview of rigorous impact evaluation methods to ensure that sufficient evidence is collected on adaptation interventions’ effects. Impact evaluation is defined as “a special study that utilizes a counterfactual to attribute observed outcomes to the intervention as well as estimate the impact of a project.” The note titled, ‘Using impact evaluation to improve policymaking for climate change adaptation in the agriculture sectors,’ highlights that experimental and quasi-experimental methods, although reliant on the availability and expertise of technical staff such as economists and statisticians, are a preferred means of measuring impacts, and should be embedded early in projects’ design.

The second briefing note identifies and explores four entry points for gender in NAP formulation, building on suggestions made by the UNFCCC’s Least Developed Countries (LDC) Expert Group. The note titled, ‘Promoting gender-responsive adaptation in the agriculture sectors: Entry points within National Adaptation Plans,’ emphasizes that climate change does not impact everyone equally, that adaptation responses in the agricultural sector are shaped by both formal and informal institutions, and that a gender perspective can avoid reinforcing or exacerbating existing inequalities. The note uses examples from Uganda and Uruguay, each of which are also featured as country case studies in other publications we review below.

FAO and UNDP’s third briefing note introduces an approach for assessing “institutional capacity” to plan climate adaptation measures in agriculture. This approach, the note explains, enables the identification of country strengths and needs, and can improve coordination between ministries, as well as cross-sector collaboration across stakeholder groups. The note titled, ‘Institutional capacity assessment approach for national adaptation planning in the agriculture sectors,’ reviews technical capacity in five key areas: 1) climate information and risks assessment; 2) long-term vision and mandate; 3) planning and implementation; 4) coordination and partnering; and 5) monitoring and evaluation. The assessments are intended to be a participatory process that builds country ownership, rather than a prescriptive exercise conducted solely by external actors.

The final briefing note reviews, ‘Cost-benefit analysis for climate change adaptation policies and investments in the agriculture sectors.’ It notes that cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is one of the methodologies that can be used to rank or prioritize projects, and outlines the standard steps of a CBA geared specifically towards agriculture adaptation. Somewhat similar to impact evaluation, a CBA compares societal benefits and costs from a project to a business-as-usual scenario under which that project has not been implemented. However, it should be noted that CBAs face challenges in two areas: 1) they discount future costs and benefits, thus placing higher weight on short-term gains; and 2) they are required to go through the difficult process of monetizing that which holds intrinsic value.

The briefs build on a set of three country case studies released by the NAP-Ag Programme last year, which review actions and initial lessons since the Programme’s 2016 launch. Those studies highlighted: Uganda’s inclusion of gender in its NAP for the agricultural sector; Kenya’s legal and institutional framework for climate change and adaptation, and early lessons learned on identifying needs and working with multiple stakeholders and governance levels; and Uruguay’s experiences in safeguarding livelihoods and promoting resilience.

Relatedly, NAP Expo 2018 was held from 4-6 April 2018, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. IISD’s Elena Kosolapova reviews the event here. Additional information on adaptation is regularly published on the SDG Knowledge Hub, and can be found under the tag Adaptation and Loss and Damage Update.

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Adaptation planning vital in helping countries weather change

Green Climate Fund

Friday 27 April 2018

...That is why in figuring out how to adapt to climate change, and how it should be financed, planning is paramount. And that is why the formulation of National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) and/or other planning processes are so important, and why GCF is such a strong backer of these efforts. GCF is supporting developing countries plan and attract larger scale finance for more resilient futures by strengthening their own adaptation planning processes. These planning processes represent key building blocks of countries’ ongoing efforts to bolster national adaptive capacities, attract investment in adaptation from a diversity of sources, and help to galvanise public and private sector-led actions to make societies more resilient to climate change. Adaptation planning processes are intended to catalyse action and finance to address high priority climate impacts and vulnerabilities. GCFs support for adaptation planning is designed to be country-driven, gender-sensitive, participatory and fully transparent. The idea of National Adaptation Planning and other adaptation planning processes was advanced by climate change negotiators within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Adaptation planning is part of the Cancun Agreements signed at the 16th UNFCCC Conferences of Parties (COP) held in Mexico in 2010. The 16th COP represented a milestone in global climate cooperation as it established the place of adaptation as being equally important as mitigation. GCF assistance for adaptation planning comes under its Readiness Programme, which is aimed at providing financial resources to developing countries, and implemented with the support of Readiness Delivery Partners selected by the countries’ National Designated Authorities. The GCF Readiness Programme assists developing countries by providing a one-time allocation of up to USD 3 million to formulate NAPS and/or other adaptation planning processes. Developing countries and Direct Access Entities can request Readiness assistance to fund the formulation of adaptation planning processes through their National Designated Authorities (NDAs) or focal points, which represent governments’ main conduits of interaction with the Fund. GCF support is based on reducing vulnerability and building climate resilience, while taking into account the urgent and immediate needs of those developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. GCF adaptation specialist Jason Spensley suggests NAPs and other adaptation planning processes should be viewed as opportunities to catalyse continued, and increasing, adaptation-focused investment across societies, including from public and private sector sources. “NAPs and any scale of planning for adaptation is all about sparking catalytic action for adaptation, and developing an evidence base to attract urgently needed investment,” he says. “Adaptation planning provides countries with a focus to integrate adaptation in long-term planning, which then also provides facts and strategies for businesses and communities to invest in for their well-being.” The approach to NAPs is not prescriptive, and varies according to developing countries’ diverse needs in dealing wih climate change, adds Mr Spensley. Countries’ adaptation solutions range from climate proofing coastal infrastructure to deal with rising sea levels, developing more drought-resistant crops, and enhancing the ability to predict and prepare for weather disasters. In the latter area, GCF has been moving to increasingly support developing countries bolster their early warning systems. WMO found that accurate forecasts and warnings about wind, storm surge and flooding hazards, and coordination between meteorological services and disaster management, helped prevent the casualty toll from the Caribbean hurricanes from being even higher. Mr Spensley highlights adaptation plans as being useful tools that empower countries and businesses deal with a more uncertain future. “They make the real threat of climate change less daunting and costly, as they help countries take proactive actions to make infrastructure and societies more resilient to future change,” he says. GCF has already approved assistance to support the formulation of national or other scale adaptation planning processes in twelve countries, including Argentina and Liberia. While the effects of climate change differ, they share the potential to undermine national development and people’s livelihoods. Floods and droughts in Argentina’s low-lying Pampas region during the past few years pose threats to national economic recovery. This is important in a country like Argentina where agriculture was estimated to have contributed to 46 percent of national exports in 2016, while Argentina has been ranked as the third biggest exporter of corn and soybean. NAPs can be particularly important in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) like Liberia where climate effects on farming are highly disruptive. This is because 70 percent of this West African nation’s people rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. While Liberia has won international recognition for its peaceful election in October last year, following two civil wars between 1989 and 2003, the UN Security Council has warned about the adverse effects of climate change across the whole of West Africa. Anyaa Vohiri, former Executive Director of Liberia’s Environmental Protection Agency, said Liberia’s NAP is a national priority as climate change represents “a clear present and future threat” because of the country’s reliance on agriculture and natural resources, tied to a high poverty level. While adaptation planning can help steer countries on resilient development paths, it also has an important part to play on the global climate scene. NAPs and other adaptation planning processes have become enmeshed in international efforts to deal with climate change under the Paris Agreement. They provide clear plans of adaptive action for countries to describe what they are doing to deal with climate change under their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), which lie at the heart of the agreement...

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Trilateral Cooperation between Malawi, China and UNDP Strengthens Resilience to Floods through Community Action

UNDP

Friday 27 April 2018

The Government of Malawi, through a trilateral partnership with the People’s Republic of China and UNDP, initiated a joint initiative in 2016 to help communities take collective action to bring sustainable solutions to predictable floods that were affecting their livelihoods. During a celebration convened in Salima today, the United Nations Resident Coordinator for Malawi and UNDP Resident Representative, Ms. Maria Jose Torres, together with the Ambassador of China to Malawi, His Excellency Mr. Shi-Ting Wang, and Malawi’s Secretary to the Vice-President and Commissioner for Disaster Management Affairs, Mr. Clement Chinthu Phiri, joined community members to mark the successful completion of new multipurpose evacuation centres and flood control structures owned, constructed and managed by these communities. The trilateral partnership on disaster risk reduction was spearheaded by Malawi’s Department for Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA), and directly benefits 23,000 people across Malawi. Four multipurpose evacuation centers have been constructed in Karonga, Mangochi, Salima and Nsanje districts, each with solar power, separate toilet facilities for women and men, separate kitchen facilities and storage space for relief supplies, and improved water access. During floods, displaced people often seek refuge in schools, churches, mosques and facilities that are not designed to host displaced communities. Through the trilateral partnership between China, Malawi and UNDP, six community-based organizations were competitively selected to receive financial and technical support to help them transform their ideas into action. In his remarks during the celebration, Ambassador Wang noted the benefits of this successful trilateral partnership. “Drawing on China’s unique development path and valuable experience in lifting its own people out of extreme poverty and vulnerability to floods, this trilateral cooperation project with DoDMA and UNDP introduced a distinctive approach for sharing ideas, resources and knowledge.” After intense flooding hit Malawi in 2015, affecting more than 1.1 million households and displacing 300,000 people, the country has embarked on multi-pronged approaches to disaster risk reduction and resilience building, including by working more closely with communities most vulnerable to flood risk. Through this partnership, the six community-based organizations mobilized people in the community to help construct the evacuation centres as well as check dams, dykes and other flood mitigation structures, relying on engineering services as needed from DoDMA and the Department of Water Resources. The centres will be used to preposition essential flood relief, while facilitating access to displaced populations during emergencies and allowing civil protection committees to use the centres as an operating base until central support can be provided by DoDMA. Such initiatives prove that communities can bring durable solutions to their own development challenges. Speaking at the event, the United Nations Resident Coordinator for Malawi and UNDP Resident Representative, Ms. Maria Jose Torres, reflected on the benefits of this partnership. “There are many pathways to building Malawi’s resilience to shocks, and too often we perceive communities as passive recipients of assistance rather than empowered actors who can bring their own solutions. This trilateral partnership between Malawi, China and UNDP demonstrates what’s possible when community-based organizations marshal people around a shared vision and commitment to action to reduce flood risk.” In his closing remarks during the event in Salima, the Secretary to the Vice President and Commissioner for Disaster Management Affairs, Mr. Clement Chinthu Phiri, noted Malawi’s vulnerability to climate change and his concern about climate projections for the region which point to greater severity, and frequency of extreme weather events in the country. “Strengthening Malawi’s resilience to shocks is at the core of the new Malawi Growth and Development Strategy. To escape poverty, households need protection against recurrent shocks such as floods, and this trilateral partnership shows how we can tackle this challenge together.”

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Deputy Secretary-General's remarks at New Climate Economy Summit [as prepared for delivery]

United Nations

Thursday 26 April 2018

Evidence is growing that countries and sectors are increasingly ready to embark on a new growth model that reduces the risks of climate change, and that will improve sustainability and achieve high quality growth while alleviating poverty. The recent International Maritime Organization agreement to cut 50 per cent of emissions from shipping by 2050 is a much-needed and long-awaited step. Now we need similar action from the Aviation sector, cement, chemical and iron and steel industries. Key sectors such as energy and transport are undergoing massive transformation, with dramatic cost reductions in renewables such as wind and solar, and a shift towards electric vehicles -- nearly 2 million are now on the road. Yet we are not close to meeting the climate ambitions we laid out in the Paris Agreement. Every day the perils become more apparent. The Gulf Stream in the Atlantic Ocean has weakened alarmingly. Climate-related disasters hit a new record last year: $320 billion. Hurricanes and heat waves are a new normal. Meanwhile, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions rose last year by 1.4 per cent, to 32.5 gigatonnes: a historic high. The emission gap remains unbearably broad, even if we implement the Paris Pledges. Our future, our very existence, continues to be under threat, exacerbated by megatrends -- population growth heading to 8.5 billion by 2030, food insecurity, rapid urbanization, water scarcity, … the list goes on. Climate change tops the list as a direct threat and a multiplier of many other threats -- from poverty to displacement to conflict. The impacts are visible across the globe -- and they are accelerating. Yet we are still struggling to find consensus on what is politically feasible, economically realistic and socially possible. This is a recipe for complete failure. The Secretary-General is determined to work towards and use his convening power to force a structural shift in our thinking, behaviour and actions. For him the Paris Agreement is not about 2030 or 2050. It is about here and now. To this end, he has decided to convene a climate summit at the UNGA in 2019 with the aim of raising ambition and scaling up climate action so we can resolve the most complex issues necessary for a less than 2-degree pathway. It will be about catalysing tangible progress, not a patchwork of incremental commitments. Thus ensuring we achieve the momentum required to achieve results by 2020.

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Zimbabwe: Irrigation As Defence Against Climate Extremes for Farmers

All Africa

Tuesday 24 April 2018

Philip Chabuda, and his wife Beula, have lived all their married life tilling what are known as "acres" at Nyanyadzi Irrigation Scheme, in Chimanimani. Over the years, the couple has witnessed their harvest increasingly choked by silt - that fine top soil - and a result of extensive deforestation and overgrazing in the area. Fields have turned into lifeless sandfields, unsuitable for crop production. "Each year it was a struggle for us as we had to scoop out the silt from the previous season from the fields, if we were to get a good harvest," said the 62 -year old, who farms on a small plot of just an acre in size, one of 15 badly affected by the silt. These are what are known colloquially as "acres".

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Panamá y PNUD avanza en políticas públicas en el cambio climático y los ecosistemas

https://www.efe.com

Monday 23 April 2018

El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) y el Gobierno de Panamá mostraron hoy resultados de las políticas públicas desarrolladas para alcanzar los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS), enmarcadas en materia climática, biodiversidad y ecosistemas. El organismo internacional, que impulsó unos cuatro proyectos en esa temática, pactó como meta promocionar la necesidad de emplazar la agenda ambiental en el núcleo de políticas y planes, para hacer frente a escenarios de incertidumbre climática y deterioro medioambiental. El representante residente del PNUD y coordinador residente del sistema de Naciones Unidas en Panamá, Harold Robinson, dijo que la agenda que impulsa la nación centroamericana es una oportunidad para acelerar las transformaciones económicas y energéticas para superar la pobreza, cerrar brechas y promover la equidad.

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Sharing an Insight on Climate Change

Solomon Times Online

Monday 16 April 2018

Tema Wickham is a Provincial Officer with UNDP Solomon Islands, working on a project to improve the resilience of fresh water resources. Tema shares the key risks and impacts Solomon Islands communities face in terms of climate change, what makes them particularly vulnerable, and what the Government is doing to address the issues.

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Building the capacity of local communities

Samoa Observer

Monday 16 April 2018

Four hundred representatives from villages and community organisations in Samoa, participated in a ‘Call for Proposals’ Workshops’ by the UNDP Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme. The main goal of the workshops was to familiarise, inform, and build the local communities capacity on how they can obtain and utilize financial assistance to address their environmental challenges.

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Village of Faleu Manono, Samoa, celebrates new climate-resilient wharf

Samoa Observer

Saturday 14 April 2018

Phase one of the Faleu Wharf renovation project has been completed and it was a cause for celebration at the village yesterday. The reconstruction began in October last year. The Mormon Welfare Society was the first to donate $25,000 for the project with the Ministry of Finance, through Ministry of Works, Transport and Infrastructure and Samoa Ports Authority, gave $50,000. The United Nations Development Programme (adaptation funds), through Civil Society Support Programme, donated $50,000. The Government of Canada, through Canada Fund, ($62,723), Government of New Zealand, through their High Commission, ($25,000), Hamrock Contruction ($1,000) and the community of Faleu Manono, fundraised $12,713 for the project.

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The fall and rise of water and weather monitoring services

The Monitor Uganda

Friday 13 April 2018

Weather and water monitoring services are two distinct areas that have been prioritized at some point and neglected at another in Uganda. During the colonial time, meteorological (weather) and hydrological (water) services were priority areas and closely monitored in the country. As such there were well established water monitoring stations in places like Butiaba on Lake Albert, Pajule in the upper Nile, Jinja, Bukoba and Kisumu on Lake Victoria. “During the 1960s, rural water was decentralized in the districts, where the Department of Water was dealing with hydrology and valley tanks in support of agriculture,” Mr Patrick Kahangire, the presidential advisor on water says. “However, with the collapse of the East African Community in the 1970s, all water related activities were brought together under the Department of Water,” he adds.

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Principles in Practice: Integrating Adaptation into Long-term Strategies

WRI

Thursday 12 April 2018

Integrating climate change adaptation into long-term planning is key to securing social and economic development, as the impacts of climate change are already affecting development outcomes. We see this throughout the world as the number of floods and droughts increase in frequency and intensity, threatening livelihoods, human health, economies, and infrastructure. In order to adequately address these emerging climate risks, new ways of planning for the future are required. For example, coastal planning needs to anticipate the effects of sea level rise. Job-creation efforts in rural settings must take into account the impact of climate change on different parts of the value chain and on the resources that feed into the value chain. Take Cambodia and Niger, two countries expected to be impacted severely by climate change, where early steps have been taken to adapt. In Cambodia, agricultural planning is addressing inconsistent water access through promoting private sector investment and the diffusion of green technologies such as solar water pumps and water-efficient irrigation. In Niger, new varieties of drought-resilient seeds have been disseminated along with training and investment to promote the diversification of livelihoods. Moving forward, in addition to these important steps, countries need to transition from energy-intensive economic growth to low-carbon growth with climate resilience. If we do not address adaptation in development planning decisions in the context of low-carbon growth, the impact of investments will be lost.

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The answer is in nature

UNDP

Tuesday 10 April 2018

What do people and trees have in common? They’re complex life systems, engineered by nature. Both are highly dependent on water to survive, and each is ultimately reliant on the other for secure access to life-sustaining H2O. Our blue planet is running out of freshwater, the life force that sustains us all. While 70 percent of the Earth is covered in water, only 3 percent of that is freshwater. And humans are consuming water at a rate faster than nature’s ability to replenish it. Our planet already has specially designed ecosystems to heal itself. The answer to our water challenges lies in nature’s technology, especially in its forests and trees.

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Sri Lankan President meets GCF Executive Director to boost climate action programme

Green Climate Fund

Monday 9 April 2018

Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena highlighted how national climate impacts are already emerging during a recent meeting with GCF Executive Director Howard Bamsey designed to enhance his country’s interaction with the Fund.

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Partnerships key to societal priorities

The Herald Zimbabwe

Monday 9 April 2018

Partnerships facilitate lasting wins for communities, as opposed to top-down implementation of externally developed projects. A tested approach that leverages skill and resources at multiple levels, partnerships are key to driving societal priorities, particularly at a time of climate change. Two seemingly disconnected groups – civil society, development agencies and Government who design and implement strategy on the one side, and villagers who try to understand and live with the strategy on the other – joining hands to deliver interventions that work. This process calls upon both parties to show commitment, listen to one another and recognise the value of the other’s skill and expertise. “The Scaling up Adaptation in Zimbabwe, with a focus on rural livelihoods” project, around which Oxfam in Zimbabwe convened civil society, smallholder farmers, Government departments and development agencies, has benefited from this multi-sectoral buy-in.

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The hanging gardens of Colombia

ReliefWeb

Friday 6 April 2018

To insulate vulnerable communities from floods and restore wetlands, Colombia promotes the use of recycled materials, suspended gardens and climate-smart agriculture. “I have guavas, lemons, oranges, tangerines, coconuts, passion fruits, chilies, eggplants, yuccas, yams and rice,” says Doña Zoila Guerra, grey-streaked hair framing her sunburnt face. “Every year in December I sell yuccas, which are thin now, but will be good by Christmas.” She speaks proudly as she surveys the cilantro planted in the garden behind her house in the Cuenca Community in San Marcos, Sucre. In 2010, Colombia was hit by widespread flooding. The flood waters wiped out farms, and flows of contaminants from illegal mines damaged crops, poisoned fish and killed mangroves and trees, making it hard for families to put healthy food on the table.

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UNDP sets up 11 automatic weather monitoring stations in Liberia

Farmers Review Africa

Friday 6 April 2018

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has embarked on a project aimed at strengthening the gathering and dissemination of weather information to promote climate change resilience among smallholder farmers in Liberia. In a statement, the UNDP said working with the Liberian government, it has set up 11 automatic weather stations (AWS), 6 agro-meteorology stations, a lightning detection system, hydrological early warning system. The project, which includes the supply of software for integrated water resource management, is a component of the UNDP Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) programme. It is funded through the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund (GEF-LDCF).

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Green Climate Fund support to agric, renewable energy vital to Zambia development – Chiteme

Lusaka Times

Friday 6 April 2018

Minister of National Development Planning Alexander Chiteme says the Green Climate Fund support to Zambia’s agriculture and renewable energy sectors will contribute to accelerating the country’s development. According to a statement released to the media by Mr Chibaula Silwamba, the Ministry’s Spokesperson, the Minister said the 19th Board meeting of the GCF in February this year approved two projects for Zambia in the agriculture and energy sectors, which are within the priority sectors of the Seventh National Development Plan (SNDP). “The Board approved US 32 million on ‘Strengthening climate resilience of agricultural livelihoods in Agro-Ecological Regions I and II in Zambia’,” Mr. Chiteme. “and, ‘the Zambia Renewable Energy Financing Framework Programme under the African Development Bank (AfDB) is worth US154 million, of which GCF contributed US 52.5million, is a project whose objective is to catalyze private sector investment in renewable energy sector, and accelerate the achievement of our electricity generation targets and the diversification of energy mix.” The Minister expressed optimism that the Strengthening climate resilience of agricultural livelihoods in Agro-Ecological Regions I and II will help support Zambia’s adaptation efforts. He said the aim of the project was to increase resilience of small holder farmers against impacts of climate change and variability by providing climate change information on time, to enable farmers plan appropriately.

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Grappling with climate change in the kingdom of happiness

PreventionWeb

Friday 6 April 2018

For Bhutan, a tiny carbon-neutral country nestled in the Himalayas between India and China, climate change is not just an environmental problem but a serious challenge to sustainable development. Communities face a range of climate-related hazards: shrinking glaciers and water reservoirs; a higher incidence of diseases spread by mosquitos and floods; as well as more frequent flash floods, forest fires and landslides. For an overview of the changes, the challenges and the solutions, UNDP caught up recently with Secretary Chencho Norbu, head of the National Environment Commission Secretariat in Bangkok.

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“A.C.T. Now Saint Lucia” Change Awareness Campaign Launched

The Voice Saint Lucia

Monday 2 April 2018

It advocates the urgent need to undergird climate change adaptation efforts with a culture of good governance at the individual, household and community levels. ACT Now Saint Lucia is an undertaking by UNDP in partnership with the Government of Saint Lucia, with funding support from the Government of Japan, through the Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership.

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Zambia working to fight climate change, meet Paris Agreement goals says UNDP

African Review

Monday 2 April 2018

Zambia is taking steps to address the impact of climate change, improve food security and meet its goals under the Paris Agreement according to a statement from the United Nations Development Programme The UNDP said in a statement that Zambia recently received US$32mn from the Green Climate Fund for a seven-year, US$137mn project to help about one million farmers mitigate the impact of climate change. “UNDP is dedicated to working with the Government and people of Zambia to support innovative ideas that reduce carbon emissions and better prepare communities for the impact of climate change,” Mandisa Mashologu, UNDP Zambia country director said. The country is also looking use better climate information in local decision making to reduce the impact of adverse weather on crops and boost production. “Many years ago, we predicted the weather and knew when to plant. But these days, the weather is unpredictable. Now the dry season can bring continuous rain while the hot season is too wet. The use of weather and climate information assisted me to plant in good time. I have increased maize production from less than a tonne per hectare to five tonnes per hectare,” said Roida Zulu, who lives in Mambwe district in Zambia’s Eastern Province. Local communities are also rethinking land use to address the impact of climate change in a country which sees frequent drought. “I am setting aside 12,000 hectares for community forest management and support for the regeneration of indigenous forest in my area. I will also encourage people to start raising trees and plant them in degraded forests,” said Chief Chitambo of the Serenje district in Central Zambia.

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Liberia’s NAP project is the first African project to be financed by the GCF.

IISD

Monday 2 April 2018

Liberia’s NAP project is the first African project to be financed by the Green Climate Fund (GCF). It aims to advance the NAP process for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors, including agriculture, energy, waste management, forestry and health, and in coastal areas in Liberia. Implemented by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and national partners, it benefits from US$2.3 million in GCF funding. The project will work to strengthen institutional frameworks and coordination for implementation of the NAP process. It will seek to expand the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation, build capacity for mainstreaming adaptation into planning and budgeting processes and systems, and formulate public, private, national and international financing mechanisms to enhance adaptation efforts in the country.

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