Coastal Zone Development

Taxonomy Term List

Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egypt

The Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egyptproject aims to protect the densely populated low-lying lands in the Nile Delta, the home of 25 percent of the Egyptian population, which have been identified as highly vulnerable to climate change induced sea-level rise. The project will be implemented by the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation with a total budget of US$ 31.4 million over seven years.

Sea-level rise will have a direct and critical impact on Egypt’s infrastructure and development along the low coastal lands. Egypt relies on the Nile delta for prime agricultural land, accordingly coastal inundation or saline intrusion will have a direct and critical impact on Egypt’s entire economy. The number of extreme weather events inducing casualties and economic losses have increased significantly in Egypt over the last ten years. These extreme events have flooded major cities, destroyed infrastructure and disturbed economic activities. In the countryside it has destroyed homes and agricultural lands, and disrupted development initiatives and the Government of Egypt's work to meet sustainable development gaols.

The GCF-financed project will expand the use of low-cost dikes system to prevent the flooding of the low-lying lands from sea surges during extreme weather events. The dike system was first tested under the pilot level under the GEF Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) project. The project will also support the development of an Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan (ICZM) for the North Coast of Egypt that links the plan for shore protection from sea-level rise with the national development plan of the coastal zones. The ICZM plan will be associated with the establishment of a systematic observation system to monitor Oceanographic parameters changes under a changing climate as well as the impact of the different shore protection scenarios on the coastal erosion and shore stability.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (30.741210567179 30.755053419625)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The "soft” coastal protection measures will directly benefit approximately 768,164 people and indirectly benefit 16.9 million people in urban and rural communities.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$31.4 million (GCF)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$73.8 million (co-financing from Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation)
Project Details: 

The Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egypt project will reduce coastal flooding risks in Egypt’s North Coast due to the combination of projected sea level rise and more frequent and intense extreme storm events. The first output of the project focuses on the installation of 69 km of sand dune dikes along five vulnerable hotspots within the Nile Delta that were identified during an engineering scoping assessment and technical feasibility study. This will provide a “beneficial reuse” for existing maintenance dredged material from a number of local sources that are operating under existing Government of Egypt approvals. The second project output focuses on the development of an integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) plan for the entire North Coast, to manage long-term climate change risks and provide Egypt with adaptability to impending flood risks. These measures would limit potential displacement of local coastal communities and reduce the number of young people who otherwise would be compelled to search for immigration opportunities.

The barriers that will be addressed by the proposed project include a lack of high quality data to inform planning decisions; absence of a suitable framework for implementing integrated approaches to coastal adaptation; weak institutional coordination to build coastline resilience to sea level rise impacts; the significant reduction of dredge material that would otherwise be disposed into the marine environment; and low institutional capacity to anticipate and manage expected sea level rise impacts. The proposed project will facilitate transformational change in the short-term by reducing coastal flooding threats along vulnerable hotspots in the Delta and in the long-term by integrating additional risks of climate change into coastal management and planning, budgeting and implementation of risk reduction measures.

The “soft” coastal protection measures will directly benefit approximately 768,164 people and indirectly benefit 16.9 million people in urban/rural communities. They have been designed to mirror natural coastal features and/or sand dunes and will transform the areas from high to low risk zones for coastal flooding. They will be stabilized with a combination of rocks and local vegetation species to encourage dune growth by trapping and stabilizing blown sand. Importantly, the coastal protection measures will provide beneficial reuse of existing dredge material that would otherwise be disposed into the marine environment.

The ICZM plan will provide benefits through capacity building to enable high resolution diagnosis of coastal threats, updated regulatory and institutional frameworks to account for sea level rise, and a coastal observation system for ongoing data collection/analysis.

The project is aligned with the Government of Egypt's (GoE) priorities as outlined in its Nationally Determined Contribution to the Paris Agreement and is line with Egypt’s Country Work Programme, as submitted to the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Based on a request made to UNDP by the National Designated Authority (Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency NDA; Coastal Research Institute (CoRI) and Shore Protection Authority (SPA)), the project is also a part of UNDP’s Work Programme to the GCF and is aligned with Government’s priorities to focus on as per the Country Programme Document, which outlines UNDP’s foci in Egypt.

Climate impacts on Egypt's North Coast

The IPCC has singled out low-lying river deltas to be one of the most vulnerable systems to climate change and sea level rise. Low-lying river deltas are home to millions of people, highly productive agricultural lands, industrial/transport infrastructure and valuable touristic assets. Compounding the vulnerability of these areas is the fact that deltas, areas of land formed from sediment where a river flows into the sea, are sinking due to both natural factors (i.e., compaction of river sediments over time) and anthropogenic factors (construction of dams that restrict the flow of sediment that would otherwise reach the river mouth and build up delta lands, groundwater abstraction). The downward motion heightens vulnerability to coastal flooding, particularly when combined with sea-level rise.

One of the three most vulnerable deltas in the world to climate change is the Nile Delta in Egypt. This region accounts for more than 50% of Egypt’s economic activity through agriculture, industry and fisheries. The Nile Delta contributes about 20% of the Egypt’s GDP and account for the largest source of employment, around 30% of the labor force. As Egypt does not produce enough food to feed its current population, any loss of prime agricultural land  due to coastal flooding from sea level rise will have a direct adverse impact on the livelihoods of millions of people and lead to hardship throughout the entire economy.

Coastal areas in the Nile Delta are especially vulnerable to climate variability and changes in sea level. Extreme events that result in increased sea level events, driven by the combination of high tides associated with sea level rise and storm surges, have led to devastating coastal flooding and millions of dollars in damages. The impacts, including the loss of life during coastal floods in Alexandria in 2015, as well as flood waters reaching and threatening to damage the international coastal road located hundreds of meters inland were significant. The rate of sea level rise for the Nile Delta ranges between 3.2 - 6.6mm/year and is due to three major factors; globally rising sea due to thermal ocean expansion; locally sinking land due to compaction of sediments; and loss of annual replenishment of sediments. The IPCC concludes that global mean sea levels have risen between 2.8 and 3.6mm/year from 1993 to 2010. During the same period, local land subsidence has been evident across the entire Delta, with actual rates ranging from about 0.4mm/year in Alexandria to the West to around 3mm/year in Port Said to the East.

Coastal areas in the Nile Delta will be more vulnerable to an increasing frequency and intensity of extreme coastal storms associated with sea level rise. As with many climate change modeling outcome, regional projections at the spatial scale of the Nile Delta suggest that the southern Mediterranean has already seen a measurable increase in the number of natural disasters: from an average of three natural disasters/year in 1980; to an average of>15/year in 2006. An increase in frequency and severity of storm surges is already evident ; and the continuation of rising seas, sinking lands, and more frequent and intense storms is a necessary inference from the review of recent trends and future climate change forecasts.

Economic damages from climate change induced sea-level rise on the North Coast of Egypt has been and will continue to be direct and far-reaching. As of 2017, much of Egypt’s population, industry, agriculture, private sector and tourism infrastructure and development is located along the northern low coastal lands, and the reliance on the Nile Delta for prime agricultural land is critically important to the country’s economy. Studies on the vulnerability of Alexandria, indicated that sea level rise of 0.3m would lead to infrastructure damage worth billions of dollars, displacement of over half a million inhabitants, and a loss of about 70,000 jobs. Moreover, the Nile Delta’s coastal lagoons are among the most productive natural systems in Egypt and they are internationally renowned for their abundant bird life. Approximately 60% of Egypt’s annual fish catch are from three main Delta lagoons, Idku, Burullus and Manzalla, separated from the Mediterranean by 0.5- 3km sand belt and dune system. Coastal flooding and/or permanent inundation of these areas would lead to a decline in water quality in coastal freshwater lagoons and corresponding adverse impacts on fisheries and biodiversity.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Reduced vulnerability of coastal infrastructure and agricultural assets to coastal flooding damage in hotspot locations in Nile Delta

The  project will enable reducing vulnerabilities of assets and populations through promoting and scaling up a set of “soft engineering solutions” and ecosystem-based coastal protection measures that can sustain proper ecosystem functioning and productivity in each of the coastal lagoons such as the conservation of existing wetlands and enhancement of their functionality. A UNDP-GEF-SCCF Climate Change Adaptation in the Nile Delta Project has tested the design and feasibility of several soft engineering solutions for coastal protection (namely beach nourishment and using of geotubes and low cost soft dikes to alleviate impacts of extreme weather events on infrastructure and human settlements) per the geomorphologic, climatic, and development characteristics of the Nile Delta area. The initial results confirm the effectiveness of these designs and have been accepted by the Egyptian coastal engineering community.

The project will scale up the use of soft engineering solutions and ecosystem-based approaches to coastal protection. The proposed interventions are no-regret interventions that need to be done no matter what priorities emerge from the ICZM plan given the incidence of coastal flooding that is currently occurring. It will support the implementation of specific measures include developing a ‘vegetative buffer’ structure for coastal protection, re-nourishing beaches, reinforcing sand dune systems as a defense mechanism, re-vegetation to stabilize seabed sediment, wetland restoration and the establishment of conservation zones to preserve essential coastal habitats.

Activity 1.1 focuses on the development of soft coastal protection (pre-construction) detailed designs, and site-specific assessments undertaken for protecting 69 km of the Nile Delta in 5 vulnerable hotspot locations.
Sub-Activity 1.1.1: Generation of local data needed to characterize the vulnerable hotspot locations including, but not limited to, digital elevation maps, geomorphology, wave characteristics, storm events, erosion/accretion trends, and other data needed to assess the suitability of soft coastal protection measures subject to the combined impact of sea level rise and extreme storm events.
Sub-Activity 1.1.2: Use of the local data generated to undertake flood modeling with and without soft coastal protection in order to establish detailed design characteristics for each of the hotspot locations
Sub-Activity 1.1.3: Finalization of all in-depth design documents, specifications, and engineering drawings necessary for the development of a comprehensive bill of quantities for the soft protection measures.

Activity 2.1 focuses on constructing location-specific coastal soft protection structures at the 5 vulnerable hotspot locations. It will involve the following major sub activities:
Sub-Activity 1.2.1: Initiate a tendering process to select local contractor(s) to construct the coastal protection measures, including quality control requirements, based on the finalized design documents and bill of quantities.
Sub-Activity 1.2.2: Carry out all site preparation activities associated with clearing, grubbing, stripping, dewatering and any other activities associated with site preparation at the five locations.
Sub-Activity 1.2.3: Construct the 5 coastal protection measures, including all excavation, fill placement/compaction, rip-rap placement, geotextile placement, and final grading.
Sub-Activity 1.2.4: Conduct and maintain records for site inspection during the construction period, including environmental safeguard monitoring during the lifetime of the coastal protection works

Activity 3.1 focuses developing and implementing an operations & maintenance programme for the installed soft protection structures. It will involve the following major sub activities:
Sub-Activity 1.3.1: Develop a soft coastal protection maintenance manual to govern future maintenance and rehabilitation activities, tailored to Nile Delta conditions.
Sub-Activity 1.3.2: Codify the procedures in the manual within the governing regulations of the SPA.
Sub-Activity 1.3.3: Conduct operations and maintenance activities over the lifetime of the project consistent with the coastal protection maintenance manual.

Output 2: Development and implementation of an integrated coastal zone management plan (ICZM) for the entire North Coast of Egypt.

The impacts of climate change on the north coast, especially regarding sea level rise, will further place the Nile Delta and the entire North Coast at risk. On the one hand, impacts such erosion and flooding will increase under different climate change scenarios with sea level rise, causing damages and losses in the coastal system (infrastructures, housing, livelihoods, coastal resources, etc.) leading to human migration outside and inside the country. On the other hand, key stakeholders will need stronger mechanisms to collaborate and join forces to face climate change challenges. A shift away from business-as-usual practices in coastal management is needed urgently to cope with sea level rise which is already occurring. The goal of long-term resilience building and risk reduction under climate change threats in the north coast requires a new planning paradigm, one offered by the implementation of the ICZM plan.

Activity 2.1 focuses on the development of national capability to conduct long-term climate change risk-induced hazard, vulnerability and risk high resolution assessments of erosion and flooding under climate change scenarios on an ongoing and iterative basis. This activity will include training in methods for the characterization of marine dynamics, establishment of databases and tools to model shoreline dynamics, high-resolution (HR) hazard assessment, and HR exposure, vulnerability and risk assessment. The assessments will be performed for different scenarios: current situation and long term scenarios (considering climate change and future coastal developments). The risk assessment will be performed at two different geographical scopes and scales: national for the whole north coast (based on the hazard assessment performed under the ICZM Scoping Study) and local at selected priority areas. The results of the process will lead to the selection of the next set of priority areas. It will involve the following major sub-activities:
Sub-Activity 2.1.1: Characterization of marine dynamics based on the numerical modelling of wind, waves, currents and sea level change in the future.
Sub-Activity 2.1.2: Establishment of coastal modeling systems consisting of databases, methods and tools suitable for modeling shoreline dynamics in the North Coast context.
Sub-Activity 2.1.3: Conducting high-resolution hazard assessment under a set of climate change scenarios to develop flooding maps that account for storm surge inundation levels that factor in projected sea level rise.
Sub-Activity 2.1.4: Conducting of vulnerability and risk high resolution assessment under climate change scenarios to integrate the exposure of coastal areas and their sensitivity to flooding and erosion impacts.

Activity 2.2 focuses on the development of a climate change risk-informed ICZM plan to include a shoreline management plan and a regulatory/legislative/institutional framework. This is the core activity of the ICZM policy cycle where the ICZM plan for the North Coast of Egypt is developed. It is estimated that the complete process for the development of the ICZM plan including the supporting frameworks will need five years. However, it is expected that there will be outputs from the ICZM plan starting from the third year of the project. Accordingly implementation of the urgent coastal protection measures will overlap with the development of ICZM plan. The ICZM Plan is essentially a planning tool that defines the objectives and measures necessary to achieve a climate-resilient development of the North Coast. It will consist of a Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) and a Coastal Management Plan (CMP), as mentioned earlier. It will involve the following major sub-activities:
Sub-Activity 2.2.1: Development of a Shoreline Management Plan for climate change adaptation to define the most promising shoreline management measures for climate change adaptation, and their implementation strategy.
Sub-Activity 2.2.2: Development of a regulatory and legislative framework to ensure the effective implementation of climate change adaptation activities under ICZM principles.
Sub-Activity 2.2.3: Development of an institutional governance mechanism at the national and governorate levels to ensure a shared ownership of the ICZM Plan with concerned authorities and civil society groups in the planning process.
Sub-Activity 2.2.4: Establishment of the monitoring and evaluation system to enable managers to take appropriate corrective actions to achieve the expected results of the plan by evaluating the progress of the plan implementation.
Sub-Activity 2.2.5: Initiate implementation of the coastal protection measures generated from the ICZM plan

Activity 2.3  focuses on the development of a capacity building program on climate change risk management for institutions involved in the long-term management of the north coast. The program will create the basis for a thorough understanding of various aspects of coastal management, including climate change adaptation and ICZM, as well as promoting collaborative networks equipped with the necessary skills, knowledge and attitudes to undertake different tasks involved in the climate change adaptation and planning of the coastal areas of Egypt. The framework for the program will aim to identify gaps and corresponding capacity needs relative to key ICZM implementation issues, and to build capacity of individuals and institutions to implement the ICZM Plan. It will involve the following major sub-activities:
Sub-Activity 2.3.1: Assessment of capacity needs for ICZM planning to catalog on-going coastal management capacity building activities, and to identify gaps in skills, knowledge and attitudes for the practice of ICZM and climate change adaptation.
Sub-Activity 2.3.2: Transfer of coastal observation and modelling systems to coastal management to ensure that staff from selected institutions have the necessary scientific knowledge to assimilate and integrate both the coastal observation and modelling systems.
Sub-Activity 2.3.3: Design and implementation of modular training program for MWRI/SPA and EEAA to build skills for professional development of coastal management practitioners, in a diversity of capacities (e.g. policy positions or day-to-day management).
Sub-Activity 2.3.4: Design and implementation of the modular training program for other stakeholders to be able to collaborate and actively participate in the implementation of the ICZM Plan.
Sub-Activity 2.3.5: Monitoring and evaluation of the capacity building program's results.
Sub-Activity 2.3.6: Design and implementation of a programme to promote sustainable livelihoods of poor women in hotspot areas for household income diversification and other community development activities

Activity 2.4  focuses on the implementation of specific components of a national observation system. The National Observation System has already been designed (see Annex IIa). It will involve the following major sub-activities:
Sub-Activity 2.4.1: Procurement and installation of an observation/monitoring equipment relative to meteorological, oceanographic, networking, and other operational objectives for coastal zone management of climate change induced risks on coastal areas.
Sub-Activity 2.4.2: Development and implementation of a capacity building programme for MWRI/SPA and EEAA that focuses on training in the operation of all elements of the national observation system, including systems for coordination with coastal zone analysts/modelers who will use the data generated.
Sub-Activity 2.4.3: Design and implementation of a quality control/assurance programme amongst the participating institutions and agencies for the collection, evaluation, and distribution of data generated from the various components of the national observation system.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
News and Updates: 

Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egypt

Dredging Today
Wednesday 4 October 2017

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) 18th Board meeting, convened in Cairo, has approved the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Project entitled “Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egypt” to be implemented by the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation. With a total budget of $31.4 million over seven years, the project aims to protect the densely populated low-lying lands in the Nile Delta, the home of 25% of the Egyptian population, which have been identified as highly vulnerable to climate change induced Sea-Level Rise (SLR). The SLR will have a direct and critical impact on Egypt’s infrastructure and development along the low coastal lands.

Green fund approves $31.4 mln UNDP project to protect Egypt's Delta from climate change

Ahram Online
Wednesday 4 October 2017

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) approved on Sunday a $31.4 million United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) project to protect Egypt's Nile Delta from rising sea levels due to climate change, the UNDP said in a press statement. The project titled “Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in the North Coast of Egypt” will be implemented by the Egyptian Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation over seven years. The GCF is a global fund that offers support to developing countries to deal with the challenge of climate change. The approval for the project came during the GCF's 18th board meeting in Cairo from Saturday to Monday.

 

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Reduced vulnerability of coastal infrastructure and agricultural assets to coastal flooding damage in hotspot locations in Nile Delta

Output 2: Development and implementation of an integrated coastal zone management plan (ICZM) for the entire North Coast of Egypt.

Adapting to Climate Change Induced Coastal Risks Management in Sierra Leone

The coastal zone of Sierra Leone is highly vulnerable to the increased frequency and severity of coastal erosion, flooding and storm surges which severely impact social wellbeing, livelihood security, water resources and major economic sectors such as fishing, tourism and agriculture. Coastal communities are already experiencing considerable repercussions of these impacts, notably on their livelihoods with reduced fishing productivity, ecosystem degradation and low farming outputs. The limited accessibility of climate-related data – in particular marine and sea parameters databases such as wave height, wave period, wind speed and direction – affects the ability of decision-makers to make informed planning and policy decisions for the coast and to take any clear strategic actions to remedy these negative effects. This inadequate lack of knowledge is contributing towards undermining social and economic development, particularly under a changing climate.

The "Adapting to Climate Change Induced Coastal Risks Management in Sierra Leone" project will strengthen the ability of coastal communities to systematically manage climate change risks and impacts on physical infrastructure and economic livelihoods. The project will work along the coastal zone in six pilot sites (Conakry Dee, Lakka, Hamilton, Tombo, Shenge and Turtle Island).

Barriers need to be overcome in order to achieve the project objective. These include: (i) the limited accessibility and use of data and information relevant to understanding coastal related climate risks, (ii) inadequate institutional and policy capacities for Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), (iii) limited awareness programmes on coastal related climate risk and human activities along the coast; (iv) inadequate resources and financial constraints, and (v) the need to introduce climate resilient livelihood options and approaches to address the climate risk facing coastal communities. The project’s approach to be adopted will deliver three complimentary outcomes to address these barriers in a coherent and holistic manner. It shall also contribute to the improvement of Sierra Leone’s ability to systematically manage coastal risks in the face of a changing climate.

Key national partners include the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA SL), the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR), the Institute of Marine Biology and Oceanography (IMBO) and the National Tourist Board (NTB).

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-12.782592799886 8.3405037764018)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
116,000 people
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$9.9 million
Co-Financing Total: 
US$ 31.6 million (anticipated cofinancing)
Project Details: 

Studies and results relating to climate change impacts from Sierra Leone’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA, 2007) revealed that rainfall and temperature patterns experienced in Sierra Leone are changing. Projections of mean annual rainfall averaged from different climate model predictions show a wide range of changes in precipitation, though all indicate a trend towards overall precipitation increase, particularly from July to December. Regional trends, indicated by the IPCC AR4, also anticipate that climate change will result in increased rainfall variability and frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, including Sea Level Rise and higher storm surge risks within West African Coastal regions. Further, results from recent studies carried out as part of the second national communication (GEF-UNDP, 2012) confirm these climate change trends with records of extreme rainfall events, extensive coastal flooding throughout the country, and severe and extensive coastal erosion as result of both heavy rainfall and tidal activity.

The continued vulnerability of coastal communities in Sierra Leone to climate induced risks and related hazards are deemed a key problem. This is further exacerbated by the limited access to accurate and timely climate data and information that can be used to inform decision-making on the coast. In addition to this key problem, weak institutional regulatory capacity coupled with the absence of a national “coastal specific” community-based information system that focuses on supporting the management of climate-related risks continue to hamper long-term coastal planning, management and early warning activities. This thereby affects the ability of coastal communities to effectively and efficiently adapt to the pressures of climate change. The introduction of innovative and resilient livelihood options to address the issue of sand mining along the coast of Sierra Leone shall provide a sustainable and economically viable solution that may be embraced by the GoSL and the construction sector.

Aligning with the SDGs

  • SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere - This project aims to improve flood and marine forecasting within the coastal zone of Sierra Leone, providing useful climate information such as daily and seasonal forecasts, particularly for coastal fishing communities. By 2030 the project will seek to improve the resilience of the poor, reducing their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.
  • SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security – The project will contribute towards ensuring that sustainable food production systems are initiated and that climate resilient agricultural practices are implemented within vulnerable coastal communities so as to increase productivity and production. The project will work with local Women’s Associations and develop resilient coastal small-scale farming including the provision of small scale water sources and irrigation systems to withstand droughts.
  • SDG 5 Achieve gender equality – Women account for over 90% of the people engaged in fish marketing, over 80% of retailers of food products and vegetables, and over 90% of operators involved in the artisanal processing of agricultural and fishery products. The project shall seek to ensure that women will be better empowered by enabling them to have access to financial services through a newly established Community Grant Facility, encouraging them to take action to get involved in local coastal adaptation projects that invest in sustainable livelihood activities.
  • SDG 11: Resilient cities and human settlements - The project will effectively develop national capabilities to better predict future climate scenarios of sea level rise and its related impacts on coastal communities. It will also work to create systematic processes for packaging, translating and disseminating climate information and warnings.
  • SDG 13: Fighting climate change and its impacts - The project will undertake a detailed topographic analyse along the coastline to develop coastal erosion profiles. This will allow for better detailed setback values and the development of a national coastal zone vulnerability and risk mapping programme. The new knowledge base generated on future climate risks will be integrated into national policies, strategies and planning processes. The project will also improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity strengthening on topics such as climate change adaptation, impact reduction and early warning systems.
  • SDG 15: Protect, restore and reverse land degradation – In an attempt to restore degraded mangrove forests, the project will support ecosystem-based interventions (including mangrove afforestation and reforestation programmes) as well as promoting the implementation of sustainable community based alternative income generation activities to help address deforestation.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced availability of high quality climate risk information that is critical for development decision-making in the coastal zone.

Output 1.1:  Climate and oceanographic monitoring network (with 6 automated oceanographic monitoring systems) and related data processing systems installed along the coastal zone to improve the knowledge base for measuring future climate induced risks.

Output 1.2: Institutional capacity of MFMR, EPA-SL, SLMD, ONS, SLMQ and IMBO for assessing coastal hazard risk and vulnerability to climate change through probabilistic modelling is strengthened.

Output 1.3: A systematical link between the collected data and the existing CIDMEWS (web based GIS) is established.

Output 1.4: The human capacity of the MFMR, EPA-SL, MLGRD is strengthened and trained on CVA techniques.

 

Outcome 2 - Appropriate protection measures, policy, budgeting and legal tools and integrated coordination mechanisms developed to improve and support policy design and implementation in dealing with current and long-term coastal challenges.

Output 2.1: Sea Level Rise and coastal erosion profiles developed for the six target pilot sites to support the strengthening of Coastal Zone Management Plans at both urban and district levels.

Output 2.2: Ecosystem-based adaptation design guidance to support future climate resilient planning and development in place.

Output 2.3: Marine spatial plan framework to compliment with ICZM is developed.

Output 2.4:  Sierra Leone ICZM is strengthened with the establishment of SL-ICZM-WG and sustainability mechanisms.

 

Outcome 3 - Public awareness enhanced and climate resilient alternatives to sand mining promoted for better adhesion of policy makers and communities on adaptation.

Output 3.1: An outreach communication, information and awareness strategy designed and implemented to enhance decision-making and foster public awareness and safety about the potential impacts of climate change;

Output 3.2:  Adaptation strategies for alternative livelihoods are designed to strengthen women and sand miner youth association’s resilience to CC impact on the coastal zone so as to reduce pressure on natural resources.

Output 3.3: CSEB practices are introduced to mitigate the risk of unregulated sand mining in Sierra Leone.

Output 3.4: Participatory implementation of urgent and priority medium-scale soft (non-structural) and hard (structural) coastal adaptation works undertaken to protect coastal community at risks.

Output 3.5: Early Warning Systems are extended to target sites in the coastal zone to protect fishing and farming communities.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 


Contacts: 
UNDP
Clotilde Goeman
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 


Information in French / Informations en français: 


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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced availability of high quality climate risk information that is critical for development decision-making in the coastal zone.

Outcome 2 - Appropriate protection measures, policy, budgeting and legal tools and integrated coordination mechanisms developed to improve and support policy design and implementation in dealing with current and long-term coastal challenges.

Outcome 3 - Public awareness enhanced and climate resilient alternatives to sand mining promoted for better adhesion of policy makers and communities on adaptation.

Civil Society Engagement: 

 

     

    Strengthening the Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau

    The "Strengthening the Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau" Project will leverage a proposed US$12 million Global Environment Facility Least Developed Country Fund Grant to develop the strong institutions and policies needed to improve risk management in coastal zones, protect investments in coastal infrastructure and diffuse new technologies to strengthen resilience within coastal communities.

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    US$ 12 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
    Co-Financing Total: 
    US$26 million (including US$2.5 million from UNDP, US$14 million from World Bank, US$9.3 million from AFDB and US$300,000 from the Government of Guinea Bissau)
    Project Details: 

    According to Guinea-Bissau’s NAPA (2006), the primary drivers of the climate vulnerability of the coastal areas and communities are physical exposure, dependence on agriculture and fishing as main livelihood options, and poor governance. Low-elevation coastal zones are especially vulnerable in Guinea-Bissau. Most of Guinea-Bissau’s land consists of coastal swamps and mangroves, and over 19 percent of its land area lies in areas less than 10 meters above sea level. The majority of the population (about 82 %) work as subsistence farmers and climate change has already begun to affect coastal farmers through increased flooding and saltwater encroachment into their rice paddies due to global sea level rise. The coastal communities and the whole population of Guinea-Bissau rely on mangrove stands and coastal lowlands for rice cultivation as a main source of income and food.

    A recent study (Sally Brown and all, 2011) has projected sea-level rises (in comparison of 1995 level) of 0.13 m, 0.35 m, 0.72 m and 1,22 m for 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 respectively. With a large and growing population in the coastal zone and a low adaptive capacity due to low national wealth and other development indicators, Guinea-Bissau appears to be highly vulnerable to sea-level rise. Without adaptation, the physical, human and financial impacts will be significant.

    Sea-level rise has the potential to displace hundreds of thousands of people over the next 100 years. With a rise of 0.13 m in 2025, 77,800 people will be flooded per year. with a rise of 0.35 m in 2050, 179,800 persons will be flooded per year. The total cos t of sea-level rises for Guinea-Bissau combining costs of forced migration, land loss, salinization, sea floods and river floods will be US$8 million per year for 2025, US$29.9 million per year for 2050 and are estimated at US$361.8 million per year by 2100.

    Climate change is predicted to also have adverse effects on fisheries and fishing. Rising sea temperatures and changes in the oceans’ other dynamics, such as acidification and loss of nursery areas, are predicted to reduce fish populations. Meanwhile, in places with rich fisheries like Guinea-Bissau, the destruction of coral reefs and mangroves destroys fish spawning grounds, decreasing the availability of fish, limiting the livelihoods of fishermen, and leading to precarious food security as sea foods are the main sources of proteins for the coastal communities.

    To address these challenges, the preferred situation is for Guinea-Bissau to have the capacity at national, regional and local levels to develop, plan and implement coastal management measures that increase resilience of coastal communities’ livelihoods and economic activities to climate change induced risks. This would imply that the climate change risks and relevant adaptation options be mainstreamed in the coastal development policies, strategies and initiatives, and the decision makers and technical staffs of the line sectors. This would also mean that the coastal communities have the required institutional support and technical and economic capacity to gradually and sustainably transform their structures, functioning, social organization and economy in order to increase their capacity to absorb shocks as well as slowly manifestation changes that undermine economic development.

    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Display Photo: 
    Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

    Outcome 1 - Policies, regulations institutions and individuals mandated to manage coastal areas strengthened to reduce the risk of climate change

    Outcome 2 - Vulnerability of coastal investments to climate risks reduced through the design, construction and maintenance of coastal protection measures

    Outcome 3 - Rural livelihoods in the coastal zone enhanced and protected from the impacts of climate change

    Enhancing Resilience Of Liberia Montserrado County Vulnerable Coastal Areas To Climate Change Risks II

    The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Liberia to ensure investment of a new tranche of US$4 million from the Least Developed Countries Fund is used to reduce the vulnerability of physical assets and natural systems, protect coastal areas, and mitigate carbon dioxide emissions. The "Enhancing Resilience Of Liberia Montserrado County Vulnerable Coastal Areas To Climate Change Risks II" project will work to build national capacity and drive policy coordination in the coastal county of Montserrado to plan and respond to climate change. The project will benefit from a proposed US$2.2 million Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund grant and US$2.1 million in co-financing.

    The project will contribute to global environmental benefits and improve the livelihoods of the citizens of Liberia with the improved management of 300 million hectares of seascapes, placing 120 million hectares under sustainable land management practices. It will promote the collective management of transboundary water systems, and implement a full range of policy, legal and institutional reforms and investments to contribute to the sustainable use of ecosystem services.

    Large environmental benefits are also planned. Most notably, 750 million tons of Carbon Dioxide will be mitigated and 1000 tons of mercury will be reduced.

    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-10.898437505234 6.2570499878091)
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    US$2.1 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
    Co-Financing Total: 
    US$2.1 million (proposed co-financing)
    Project Details: 

    The Liberia coastline is subject to see level rise. Indeed, by the year 2090, the SRESB1 predicts a rise of sea level between 0.13m and 0.43m, whereas SRESA1 predicts a rise of between 0.18m and 0.56m , relative to 1980 - 1999 mean , (INC, 2013). This forecasted sea level rise, combined with increased intensity of storms and potential storm surges is very likely to accelerate the present catastrophic situation of coastal erosion. The orientation of Liberia’s coastline and its location on the Gulf of Guinea coastline, make it particularly exposed to the southern Atlantic annual sea storm surges. These surges lead to average tidal rises of over 2m during a brief period in spring – a major driver of coastal erosion. According to the NAPA (2008), the areas along the coast where erosion is most severe are Montserrado County coastlines, (West Point and New Kru Town and River Cess), Buchanan and Cestos Cities.

    In the Montserrado County, sea-level rise would lead to shoreline retreat. The intensity of the retreat would vary along the coast from between 10 meters/year in the higher cliffed zone (e.g. between Mamba Point and Sinkor) to about 20 meters/year in the lowlands on Bush Rod Island. A considerable population is currently residing and working in these threatened zones, particularly around West Point. Another important expected impact of sea level rise is direct inundation of low-lying wetlands and dry land areas. For example, over the last 40 years, Liberia has experienced a number of climate-induced and sea-induced disasters. Communities such as New Kru Town and Hotel Africa in Montserrado are regularly under water. According to the Environment Protection Agency (EPA), it is projected that a one meter sea level rise (scenario B2) would lead to permanent inundation of about 95 km2 of land in the coastal zone of Liberia. With a one-meter sea level rise, densely populated parts of t he capital city of Monrovia and its environs – including West Point, Hotel Africa, Kru Town and River Cess would be submerged. These are currently the housing areas for tens of thousands of people. A conservative estimate suggests about 250 million United States Dollars worth of land and infrastructures (such as the Hotel Africa complex) would be lost . The anticipated socio-economic impacts of the nexus of sea-level rise, coastal erosion and regular coastal flooding are largely negative and potentially disastrous for coastal communities. These factors are likely to have most impacts in the most densely populated areas such as the coastal areas of the County of Montserrado with large numbers of poor people. They are likely to destroy property, destroy rural infrastructure (markets, roads, centres, clinics), to destroy land, to destroy livelihood equipment (boats, mobile market stands, stoves, etc). Quite simply, the poor people have nowhere to go and no way to protect their personal and community belongings. Montserrado coastal communities are already observing and feeling the impacts of the sea-level rise, coastal erosion and coastal flooding nexus.

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    Output 1 – Capacity of the climate change secretariat enhanced to drive policy coordination in the coastal county of Montserrado to plan and respond to climate change.

    Expected Outputs:
    •    1.1. Raised awareness of senior county officials, decision-makers and stakeholders.
    •    1.2 Capacity of the National Climate Change Secretariat (NCCS) is strengthened
    •    1.3 A county coastal protection unit is established, staffed and equipped
    •    1.4 Semi-skilled workers able to prepare, build and maintain gabions and revetments etc.
    •    1.5 A system for monitoring the maintenance of coastal protection measures is established,
    •    1.6 County Development Agenda that fully addresses climate change prepared and approved.

    Outcome 2 – At the sites of Hotel Africa and Kru Town, sustainable and affordable measures to protect coastal areas against climate change impacts are demonstrated.

    Expected Outputs:
    •    2.3 Hotel Africa and New Kru Town communities protected from climate change impacts.

    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Project Status: 
    News and Updates: 

    US$2M for New Kru Town Coastal Defense

    Liberian Observer
    Friday 24 February 2017

    Local Project Appraisal Committee members attending a one-day appraisal meeting yesterday at a resort in Monrovia agreed that the US$2 million provided by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) must be directed to the ongoing New Kru Town coastal defense project. Among other things, the project aims to ensure that the D. Twe Memorial High School and the Redemption Hospital are not swept away by erosion. The participants were drawn from the Ministry of Lands & Mines and Energy (MLME), the Ministry of Public Works, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), civil society members, the Forestry Development Authority (FDA) and the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP). The local Project Appraisal Committee members, before the unanimous decision, examined a summary project document presented by the EPA and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The meeting was held under the theme: “Enhancing Resilience of Montserrado County Vulnerable Coastal Areas to Climate Change Risks.”

     

    Display Photo: 
    Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

    Outcome 1 – Vulnerability of physical assets and natural systems reduced.

    Outcome 2 – At the sites of Hotel Africa and Kru Town, sustainable and affordable measures to protect coastal areas against climate change impacts are demonstrated.

     

    Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change

    Climate-induced pressures are negatively impacting impacting the energy sector in Benin. As average temperatures rise, electricity demand is increasing - with more intensive and longer use of air conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration needed during the year. Coupled with inefficient household and commercial equipment (fridges, TV, AC, fans) and non-efficient lighting of buildings, there are critical imbalances in the energy sector. 

    With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources and enhance the efficiency of energy supply and demand, this project, Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change, will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for a better planning and management of the energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector

     

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (2.4073791427729 10.170619887336)
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    8,000,000 USD (GEF Project Grant)
    Co-Financing Total: 
    31,570,000 USD
    Project Details: 
    The project will contribute in overcoming the political, institutional, financial barriers and those relating to individual capacities and to knowledge impeding to prevent and reduce the impacts in vulnerable communities of climate-related risks on the energy sector of Benin. This will involve the development of a strategy for strengthening resilience of the key energy sources, the integration of climate risks in the planning and budgeting processes of the energy sector and the promotion of behavioural change on the part of both consumers and producers of energy.
     
    Both resilient energy use and the development of alternative energy sources (portfolio approach) will be necessary to reduce vulnerability. Given the importance of biomass in the context of Benin’s current energy supply, these measures will also need to be backed up by the practice of sustainable land management options especially in areas that are more vulnerable and the promotion of income-generating activities, alternatives to non-sustainable forest and land uses practices in riparian communities of wood energy supplying landscapes, and the adoption and implementation by Benin, of institutional, political and regulatory measures aiming at removing any obstacles to such adoption of adaptation measures.
     
    The project will, therefore, support the achievement of the following key results: (a) Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools (Outcome 1), (b) introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas (Outcome 2), and (c) promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy (Outcome 3).
    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project will support the achievement of the following key results: Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools, introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas, and promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy.

    Component 1 : Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools
    Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures

    Component 2: Sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of the zones supplying wood for energy
    Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts

    Component 3: Technology transfers to strengthen the resilience of livelihoods and living conditions of the vulnerable communities
    Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Henry Rene Diouf
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Saliou Toure
    Technical Specialist, RSCSA
    Location: 
    Funding Source Short Code: 
    LDCF
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Minister Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin). 

    Display Photo: 
    About (Summary): 
    With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources, and enhancing the efficiency of energy supply and demand, the Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change project will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for better planning and management of energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Ministry of Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin).
    Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

    Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures.

    Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts.

    Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector.

    Project Dates: 
    2016 to 2021

    Building Shoreline Resilience in Timor Leste

    1.1: A comprehensive shoreline management plan developed and budgeted for the entire coast of Timor Leste (as part and a direct contribution to NAP) ($220,000)

    1.2: Tibar Bay coastal protection and resilience strategy adopted and budgeted as part of the Port construction and management plan ($180,000)

    1.3: Technical skills (through specialized trainings), hardware (at least two sets of hydro-meteorological stations and wave gauges), methods (economic valuation and cost-benefit analysis) and software (e.g. InVest) introduced to monitor climate change induced coastal change and plan for management responses ($650,000)

    1.4: Forestry and Fisheries Directories under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries have their roles, coordination planning mechanisms clarified and enforced for improved management of mangrove and other critical coastal habitats (as emerges from NAP consultation process) ($50,000).

    2.1: At least 1000 ha of degraded mangrove areas rehabilitated through natural recruitment and restoration of hydrological regimes both in the northern and southern coasts with a direct employment of local coastal communities; - based on hydrological study, restoration of mangrove hydrological support system (i.e. pond and marchlands); - based on mangrove inventory and GIS mapping of coastal changes from SLR and inundation cycle and extent, implement mangrove rehabilitation on the identified priority segments; - establish mangrove nurseries and maintenance protocols under the MAF and with direct participation / employment of coastal communities, particularly women ($2,520,000)

    2.2: Mangrove-based, diversified livelihoods / social businesses (e.g. silvo-fisheries, fuel wood plantations, agroforestry, see grass cultivation, salt production etc) established in at least 10 coastal sucos benefitting at least 20,000 people and empowering women ($1,400,000);2.3: at least 10 suco development plan include mangrove-based livelihood support measures ($80,000)

    3.1: Upstream watershed replantation demonstrate risk reduction, (including reduction of excessive sediment loads) to downstream coastal waterways and areas ($600,000)

    3.2: Coastal wetland restoration and artificial groundwater recharge plans developed and initiated to increase storm water absorption capacity and buffer seawater intrusion ($600,000)

    3.3: Based on economic valuation study of ecosystem services, infrastructure offset for coastal protection scheme (and other financial mechanisms, such as payment for ecosystem services - PES) devised to secure financial resources for coastal resilience ($400,000)

    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Contacts: 
    Keti Chachibaia
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Display Photo: 
    Project Dates: 
    2016

    Addressing Climate Change Vulnerabilities and Risks in Vulnerable Coastal Areas of Tunisia

    The coastal zone of Tunisia is home to two-thirds of the total population. It is a densely populated area where much of the nation’s large cities are. The coastal region has a varied topography and an irregular 1,445 Km of continental coastline extended from the North to the East, and 450km of island coastline.

    It has played a pivotal role in the countries cultural and economic progress. The diverse natural environment provides a wide range of services across several sectors. Overall, the coast houses more than 80% of economic activities, 90% of the total capacity for tourist accommodation and a large part of the irrigated agriculture in the country (Ministry of Environment and Development Planning 2001).

    Today, the low-capacity to deal with the impacts of climate change in coastal zones represents the major issue Tunisia is facing. . In fact, it is inhibited by a lack of appropriate climate-sensitized policies and appropriate enabling legislations towards an integrated approach to coastal management.

    By strengthening and implementing climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction at the local and national level, the project is working to create a more climate-resilient communities. It offers a risk-based approach to strengthen resilience to climate change and provides opportunities to local actors to be an effective agent of change for better risk informed development in the coastal zones. 

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (9.40429686025 33.3764123621)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    The coastal community of Tunisia
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $5,600,000 ($5,500,000 GEF and 100,000 PNUD)
    Project Details: 

    The project is designed to address the main national adaptation priority on integrated coastal zone management and takes a three-pronged approach for building long term resilience of the coast. Firstly, it revises critical national regulations on coastal zoning based on impact scenarios generated by coastal models and develops local adaptation plans for Tunisia’s most vulnerable coastal locations.

    Secondly, the project provides direct investments for climate resilient coastal defence options, considering coastal land use practices and future priorities, geomorphology of the coastline, and a range of plausible scenarios of sea level rise impacts.

    Thirdly, the project introduces economic and financial instruments, such as taxes and insurance mechanisms both to mobilise internal resources for coastal defence and adaptation investments, and to regulate development in highly sensitive and exposed coastal regions.

    By strengthening and implementing climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction at the local and national level, the project is working to create a more climate-resilient nation.

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    The project has three components with the following associated outcomes –

    1. Enabling policy and institutional frameworks through regulations and enforcement mechanisms governing coastal land use to include climate risks management requirements (Outcome 1.1); the introduction of advanced methods and tools for coastal risk assessment and adaptation planning (Outcome 1.2); delivery of hardware and software observation capacities, data collection and treatment (Outcome 1.3) and; the revision of zoning regulations and disaster management strategies on impact scenarios, shoreline management planning and cost-benefit analysis of adaptation options (Outcome 1.4).
    2. Replicable adaptation measures are developed in the target coastal sites including shore protection practices and technologies to mitigate long-term risks (Outcome 2.1); controlled extraction and improved management systems for coastal fresh aquifer (Outcome 2.2); Strengthening of technical capacities, institutional functions and associated budgets for the maintenance, planning and expansion of  the introduced shore protection and coastal adaptation practicies (Outcome 2.3) and; Development of a coastal risk monitoring and early warning system (Outcome 2.4).
    3. Economic incentives for coastal adaptation are created including a comprehensive coastal adaptation investment plan for the tourism sector (Outcome 3.1); introduction of regulations and disbursement procedures for the National Fund for the Protection of Tourism Zones (Outcome 3.2) and; introduction of property insurance and fiscal mechanisms that provide effective risk sharing and risk reduction incentives for highly exposed businesses and households (Outcome 3.3).

     

    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    (More information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Tom Twining-Ward
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Project Status: 
    Display Photo: 

    Building resilience of Muanda’s communities from coastal erosion in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo’s coastal zone stretches 40 km and comprises of the towns of Muanda, Banana and Nsiamfumu. The problem of coastal erosion has intensified since 1980 with significant retreat of the coast in the Banana-Muanda segment, this retreat has been estimated as much as 2,300 meters. In the future, the DRC can expect to see its territory reduced from 50-100 m on its coastal area.

    In order to address this problem in its entirety, this UNDP-supported project in Muanda aims to address the root causes of information gaps, lack of technical knowledge to effectively support communities to identify, plan, design and implement adaptation options. The project has two main components, which will employ resources to support coastal management planning process (Outcome 1) and implement urgent and immediate adaptation measures in the most vulnerable coastal communities of Muanda (Outcome 2).

    Photos: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POINT (23.2031249919 -5.33164414607), POINT (24.1699218668 -6.20609049118), POINT (24.1699218668 -6.20609049118), POINT (24.3457031168 -6.38081232454))
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Coastal communities in the city of Muanda
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $5,863,725
    Co-Financing Total: 
    $16,500,000
    Project Details: 

     

     

    (More Information to come)

     

    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

     

    The project has two main components with the following outcomes –

    1. Integration of climate risks information into relevant planning policies through the mapping of climate change induced coastal erosion risk profile (Outcome 1.1); Development of guidelines and roadmap for the inclusion and the provision of climate smart finance into Muanda Urban development Plan (Outcome 1.2); Dissemination of knowledge and the design of an effective communication strategy to enhance understanding of climate change risks in the coastal zone, associated adaptation options costs/benefits, supporting policy planning policy process and sharing results and lessons generated from interventions made through this initiative (Outcome 1.3)
    2. Investment in coastal defence and monitoring including establishment of a climate risk monitoring system o monitor/record real-time coastal erosion/sea level rise observations and to support the development of an Early Warning System (EWS) of coastal risk for local coastal communities (Outcome 2.1); The pilot of a menu of “soft” (re-vegetation, land planning, etc.) and “hard” adaptation measures (composite beach revetments, off shore breakwater, etc.) to stabilize cliffs, secure the operations of docking and unloading of fishing and minimise losses (Outcome 2.2); Implementation of small-scale community-based adaptation initiatives among the Youth and Womens’ Association in Muanda focused on developing alternative climate resilient livelihood opportunities (Outcome 2.3).
    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

     

    (More Information to come)

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Mame Diop
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Project Status: 
    Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

    (More Information to come)

    Reducing vulnerability to coastal flooding through ecosystem-based adaptation in Cuba

    Mangroves cover more than 5% of the total area of Cuba and play a vital protective role against effects of storm surges and sea level rise. This UNDP-supported project, "Reduction of vulnerability to coastal flooding through ecosystem-based adaptation in the south of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces," seeks to reduce the vulnerability of communities in coastal areas of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces from climate change related coastal erosion, flooding and saltwater intrusion.

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POINT (-82.7929687751 22.7761815304)
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Local communities in Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $ 6,067,320
    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    With the objective of increasing the resilience of populations in the coastal regions of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces to the effects of climate change, the project will have the following key components –

    Component 1: Reduction of the impacts of coastal flooding through the recovery of coastal ecosystems Re-establishment of coastal belt of red mangrove between Surgidero de Batabanó and Punta Mora (Output 1.1); Restoration of mangrove ecosystems between Majana and Surgidero de Batabanó (Output 1.2) and; Elimination and/or control of invasive alien species in coastal wetlands between Majana and Punta Mora (Output 1.3)

    Component 2: Integrated and participatory management of coastal ecosystems to increase resilience to climate change Ecosystem-based adaptation mainstreamed into integrated coastal zone planning and productive sector activities (Output 2.1); Buy-in, participation and governance in local communities (Output 2.2) and; knowledge management systems at community level (Output 2.3)

    Component 3: Establishment of a favourable enabling environment at regional level for the effectiveness and sustainability of adaptation investments Consolidated information on costs and benefits of EBA available to decision makers and planners (Output 3.1); Strengthened institutions including provincial and municipal Governments, Forest Guard Corps, Frontier Guards and Fisheries Department supporting ecosystem-based adaptation actions (Output 3.2

    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    Lyes Ferroukhi
    Regional Technical Advisor
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Project Status: 

    CBA Viet Nam: Minimizing Climate Change Impacts for Sustainable Aquaculture in Con Truong, Hoang Chau Commune

    Aquaculture is the main activity and source of income for the 8,264 residents of Viet Nam’s Hoang Chau community. The nearby Truong Islet plays a key role in the aquaculture development of the region, as it prevents ocean waves and winds from reaching Hoang Chau Commune and its small mangrove forest area, which helps to preserve local biodiversity. Due to climate change impacts, including saltwater intrusion from strong winds and high waves brought upon by global warming, the region’s ecosystem is very fragile.  Local shrimp banks are constantly affected by the sea (winds, waves and salt contamination) and inland factors (water pollution from Ma River headwater and human activities). All these factors are destroying sea dykes, and the cost of reinforcing the degraded dyke is high. Since the 1970s, limited financial capacities have prevented shrimp farming methods from evolving, and they remain highly dependent on climate conditions. Climatic impacts have led to a reliance on natural resources, resulting in their overexploitation. To face these challenges, the local community is looking for appropriate production models that can adapt to extreme climate change.

    This Community-Based Adaptation project aims to promote sustainable fisheries development by testing climate change adaptation models in aquaculture and fishing. Thanh Hoa Fisheries Association initiated the project after extensive discussions with local residents through a participatory process actively involving the Hoang Chau community. The project aims at testing climate change adaptation models in aquaculture and fishing for sustainable fisheries development in Truong Islet, a brackish water region in Thanh Hoa Province and Hoang Chau Commune.

    This project is part of Viet Nam's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

    Photos: 
    Region/Country: 
    Level of Intervention: 
    Key Collaborators: 
    Thematic Area: 
    Coordinates: 
    POLYGON ((105.754852288 19.8342171669, 105.793304436 19.8303416445, 105.793304436 19.7980419489, 105.761718743 19.7954576899, 105.754852288 19.8342171669))
    Primary Beneficiaries: 
    Coastal Communities; Farmers
    Funding Source: 
    Financing Amount: 
    $50,000
    Project Details: 

    Thanh Hoa is a province in the north of Central Vietnam, with 102 kilometers of coastline, 17,000,000 square kilometers of ocean surface and a population of over 3.6 million. The coastal and gulf area is favourable for aquaculture development. Ponds, lakes and shallow areas for aquaculture and riziculture make up 7,500 hectares. About 480,000 people rely on aquaculture for their primary income. The annual gross of fisheries products is 75,000 tons, 45,000 tons of which come from ocean exploitation and 30,000 tons from aquaculture. The potential to develop aquaculture is great, yet crop failures are common due to frequent natural disasters, exhausted coastal resources, polluted water and diseases.

    Located in the southeast of Hoang Chau Commune, Hoang Hoa District, Truong Islet has a crucial role to play in aquaculture development in both Hoang Chau and Thanh Hoa Province as a whole. The Islet has a brackish water aquaculture area of 300 hectares, accounting for 1/10 of the total brackish water aquaculture area in the Province. From an economic and social perspective, the Islet has a crucial role in preventing wave and wind impact on inner regions, including Hoang Chau Commune. From a biological perspective, Truong Islet has significant biodiversity on land and in the water.

    In the 1970s and 1980s, the mangrove forest area in Truong Islet was relatively large (about 200 hectares), with many kinds of fisheries species like shrimps, crabs, oysters, and lots of fishes.

    Shrimp farming first appeared in Truong Islet in the 1970s. At present, there are 5 divisions with 137 households doing aquaculture in Truong Islet, both natural resource exploitation and farming fisheries products. Hoang Chau fishermen are facing several challenges, including the impact of climate change. The change in salinity due to saltwater intrusion results in slow development or massive death of fisheries species. The residents have to make higher dykes to cope with higher sea levels. The temperature fluctuations weaken fisheries species and make them susceptible to disease and death. Small floods, which now come earlier in the year, make the residents harvest shrimp prematurely, affecting their economic value.

    Fisheries resources in the region are seriously degrading. In recent years, Ma River has been polluted due to human activities, affecting the aquaculture in Truong Islet. Aquaculture in Truong islet is at high risk because of environmental pollution and unpredictable weather. Aquaculture techniques have not changed ever since they started this trade: they still use the conventional methods although breeds, climate and natural resources conditions have changed considerably as a result of environmental degradation and the negative impacts of climate change.

    To address these challenges, this Community-Based Adaptation project implements the following key activities:

    1. Improve farming techniques in aquaculture and fishing to adapt to climate change
    2. Plant mangrove forests to reduce impact of natural disasters, to protect the surrounding banks and prevent erosion caused by sea level rise
    3. Protect and regenerate natural fisheries resources for sustainable exploitation of natural fisheries resources in the project area
    4. Experiment with a community revolving loan programme to assist affected fishermen in aquaculture development and disaster emergency
    5. Enhance community capacity and awareness on climate change and sustainable aquaculture issues
    Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

    Outcome 1: Building and testing models to adapt to climate change in brackish water aquaculture and fishing

    Design and test 3 Models with suitable species and crops (Output 1.1) and include 20 households that will benefit from these models (Output 1.2).

    Outcome 2: Mangrove forests and resources are managed and used in a sustainable manner

    Design a commune plan (Output 2.1) that plants at least 20 hectares of mangrove forests (Output 2.2), including beekeeping models that directly benefit at least 20 households (Output 2.3).

    Outcome 3.0: A revolving loan programme is developed and managed by the community

    Enroll at least 20 households in the loan programme in the first year (Output 3.1), and at least 30 more households by the end of the project (Output 3.2). Repay the investment for experimental models, to be put in the loan programme for revolving (Output 3.3).

    Outcome 4.0: Training and awareness raising activities on CC issues and sustainable fisheries are conducted

    Hold at least 4 awareness raising workshops for at least 300 participants (Output 4.1), at least 12 training sessions and 10 community workshops for at least 500 participants (Output 4.2), and about 50 community meetings to discuss project issues and activities (Output 4.3). Form and operate groups of key fishermen for monitoring environment protection, mangrove forest protection, exploitation of fisheries resources protection (Output 4.4) Develop and apply community regulation procedures (Output 4.5) while strengthening working relationships with related water management agencies to manage the water source and protect community’s rights (Output 4.6)

    Outcome 5.0: Fisheries resources are regenerated.

    Build a crab bank model at 3 different locations around Truong islet (Output 5.1) and organize 3 fish and shrimp releases in the project area (Output 5.2).

    Monitoring & Evaluation: 

    The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA) will be measured at the planning stage of the project, at the mid-point, and at the end of project. Given that the VRA is qualitative and is based on the community perceptions, the first VRA was conducted to establish a baseline during the Project planning phase as described above. A second VRA will be done at mid project after all the project model building activities have been completed. A final VRA will be done at the end of the project to assess the overall impact of the project on the community adaptive capacity.

    The VRA questions that will be used are as follows:

    1. Rate the impact of climate change (extreme weather and early small flooding, temperature rise, sea level rise and salinity) on your income from aquaculture and fishing
    2. Rate your ability to cope with the negative impacts of climate change 3. Rate the impact on your livelihood if climate change impact doubles
    3. Rate how effective you think this project will be in reducing your risks from increasing natural disasters and temperature rise, sea level rise and salinisation.
    4. Rate your confidence that the project will continue to reduce climate change risks after the project ends.

    The Impact Assessment System (IAS) indicator will be measured at the end of the project using the following components:

    1. The number of hectares/models of aquaculture development applying the project techniques in sustainable aquaculture and fishing to adapt to CC impact
    2. The number of hectares of mangroves protected and planted
    3. The number of innovations developed/applied under the project (4) The number of policy recommendations proposed in environmental protection and sustainable use of natural resources (fisheries and mangroves) for sustainable aquaculture and fishing in the climate change context

    The targets for the above are as follows:

    1. Three (3) models will be tested by the project.
    2. 15-20 ha of mangroves will be protected and planted.
    3. 2-3 innovations developed/applied under the project
    4. Three to four recommendations on policies in sustainable aquaculture and fishing in the climate change context will be proposed to local authorities.
    Contacts: 
    UNDP
    CBA Project Management Unit
    Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
    Location: 
    Funding Source Short Code: 
    SPA
    Project Status: