Rural Development

Taxonomy Term List

Scaling Up Climate Resilient Water Management Practices for Vulnerable Communities in La Mojana

The proposed "Scaling Up Climate Resilient Water Management Practices for Vulnerable Communities in La Mojana" project supports the Government of Colombia in scaling up climate resilient integrated water resource management practices in La Mojana - one of the poorest and most climate-vulnerable regions in Colombia.

Extreme weather and climate events, such as intense flooding and prolonged dry seasons have caused significant impacts to the population and current climate projections expect these to become more frequent and intense. Loss of agricultural crops that sustain livelihoods, significant changes to ecosystems that have previously provided a buffer to flooding, and adverse impacts from prolonged dry periods are common and worsening with time. In addition, climate change induced pressures are straining already stressed water sources in the region, affecting both supply and quality.

A new disaster risk management model for La Mojana - based on adaptive and not reactive solutions - needs to be adopted to ensure long term resiliency to climate change scenarios. Particularly urgent is the need for comprehensive water use management solutions that are adapted and address increased flooding and longer dry periods. The solutions must account for household and agricultural climate resiliency and reestablish the natural capacity of the ecosystem (through restored eco-systemic functions) to reduce the impacts of extreme climate change events while providing the local capacity to prevent loss of life and livelihoods through early warning alerts and correct planning.

Once implemented, these measures will help local authorities better manage flooding and overcome water shortages during periods of prolonged dry seasons. The measures will significantly reduce the vulnerability of people, communities and their assets.

The project will advance a significant paradigm shift with GCF-resources being levaraged to operationalize the first comprehensive climate adaptive regional development plan, which will serve as a model for the rest of Colombia. This includes adopting a long-term disaster risk reduction strategy that is based not solely on infrastructure but also on restoring ecosystem services for regional water management and directly empowering vulnerable communities and regional authorities to manage projected climate risks. The project will also seek to implement new technologies that work with existing and future climate conditions such as the use of solar power and rain water harvesting to address long-term water supply. The project scales up results that have already been tried and tested in Colombia while addressing paradigm shifts in technology for water supply and community involvement for long-term resiliency and project ownership.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
More than 203,918 people, the total rural population residing in Colombia’s La Mojana region, will be direct beneficiaries, with a further 201,707 people benefitting indirectly.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$74.6 million (proposed GCF funding)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$68.9 million (proposed co-financing from National Adaptation Fund, Presidential Agency for International Cooperation, Municipal Government, Local Research Centers, and Local Environmental Authority)
Project Details: 

The overarching goal is to enhance climate resilience of vulnerable communities in the La Mojana region. This will be achieved through long-term adaptive solutions that address the supply, use and risk management pertaining to floods and lack of water. The solutions are both technical in nature and include systemized knowledge management mechanism and activities that will ensure that the information is shared with relevant stakeholders at a community, rural productive and local planning level thus addressing the information and capacity gaps identified above through active community participation.

Including community engagement as well as a variety of new stakeholders in the form of respected local and national institutions as key allies in creating resiliency and disaster risk management in the region is highly innovative for Colombia. Not only does it break from past experiences that were isolated from the communities they were trying to protect, but it also provides an opportunity for actions to be highly informed so that they are locally appropriate and address information barriers in a manner that favors practical consultations and best practices. It also ensures ownership, governance, and sustainability.

Interventions through the proposed project will provide practical solutions that are compatible with community needs as identified through the implementation of the MADS-AF project. In addition, key results such as crop diversification and water supply access will be seen within the project lifetime thus creating a positive incentive for active community engagement. Linking solutions that are directly linked in improving the lives of the community has been among the lessons learned from both the MADS-AF project and past infrastructure based interventions that failed to address overall risk to the region.

Partnering with local and national institutions such as the Institute von Humboldt, FEDEGAN and FEDEARROZ, and local universities among others will provide an opportunity not only in ensuring that lessons learned are spread throughout a large variety of stakeholders but also for them to see their own role in comprehensive risk management. This will be particularly the case of universities, knowledge institutions, rural extension workers and productive associations.

Technical solutions for water supply make special consideration to low maintenance and operation cost to ensure sustainability, prioritizing locally available technologies. This is the case with the water tanks and the adaptation of the current hydrological water infrastructure. Training through the knowledge management and rural extension component will ensure that maintenance and operation of the equipment is provided to the community members.

The project will create direct benefits to 203,918 people (45% of which are women) that account for the rural population in La Mojana. This cohort of people has been targeted due to their high level of climate vulnerability as a result of their isolation, proximity to flood prone areas and limited access to sustainable alternative water sources. The target population can be classified in terms of their rural isolation with those living in the most remote areas as the rural disperse population (44,714 people of which 20,269 are women) and those residing rural areas at a closer proximity from urban centers as the rural nuclei population (159,264 people). Both of these populations account for nearly 50% of the total population in La Mojana and are the most vulnerable to climate shocks.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1. Systemizing knowledge of the impacts of climate change on water management for planning.

Under Output 1, the project will use GCF funds to ensure that knowledge is managed and disseminated effectively to enhance decision making and long-term planning in a manner that streamlines adaptation to identified climate risks in the region. This will be done through the development of technical models and guidelines as well as a knowledge management program and capacity building system that will be cross cutting and will ensure the systemization of knowledge for use as a planning tool not only in the region but also nationally. 

Output 2. Promote climate resilient water resources infrastructure and ecosystem restoration by vulnerable households and communities

Activities through this output are focused on providing regionally appropriate long term water management solutions to the rural communities in La Mojana (both rural disperse and rural nuclei). Under Output 2 GCF funds will be invested in flood resilient water infrastructure and wetland restoration as long-term water supply and disaster risk management solutions to the region. These solutions aim to ensure sustainable and safe water access to La Mojana’s most water vulnerable communities and be congruent to regional climate projections. Sub activities are adapted and differentiated to address the different access needs based on the level of dispersion and water vulnerability of the population.

Output 3. Improved Early Warning Systems for Climate Resiliency

Output 3 will apply GCF funds to enhance the current early warning system through improved monitoring and forecasting capacity, increased hydrological coverage, and the dissemination of regional and productive relevant alerts that are tailored to users’ needs and communication channels. Implementation will include in their management arrangements national government agencies such as IDEAM, the local environmental authorities (Corporaciones Autonomas), and the University of Cordoba who will be in charge of managing the Regional Forecasting Center that is being created with co-financing from the GoC through the NAF.

Output 4. Enhance rural livelihoods through climate resilient agroecosystems

Output 4 is focused on the promotion of agro-diverse and climate resilient crops in the region and the implementation of climate -dapted productive practices to  enhance rural livelihoods and enable resiliency to future climate outlooks for La Mojana. GCF funds under output 4 will be used for research and implementation of adaptive local agriculture and livestock practices to favor correct water management at a household, productive and landscape level. The output will enable water resiliency in the region to ensure that livelihoods are adapted to climate projections.

Contacts: 
Gabor Vereczi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1 - Strengthened understanding and systemizing knowledge of the impacts of climate change on water management

Output 2 - Improved water resources management by vulnerable households and communities

Output 3 - Improved climate-resilient Early Warning Systems

Output 4 - Enhanced climate-resilient agroecosystems-related rural livelihoods

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2025

Supporting Climate Resilient Livelihoods in Agricultural Communities in Drought-Prone Areas of Turkmenistan

Turkmenistan is a water stressed country with one of the harshest climates in the Central Asian region. Climate change modeling indicates significant increases in temperature and reduction in rainfall. This will lead to a decrease in total volume of water availability that is likely to have a profound impact on agricultural production systems and local farmers. The long-term solution envisaged by the Government of Turkmenistan is to mainstream climate change adaptation in order to secure climate resilient livelihoods in agricultural communities. To help the Government meet this objective, the "Supporting Climate Resilient Livelihoods in Agricultural Communities in Drought-Prone Areas of Turkmenistan" project will support three inte-related components, namely (i) improving climate-related socio-economic outcomes in agricultural communities in Lebap and Dashoguz velayats through community-based adaptation solutions; (ii) mainstreaming climate adaptation measures in agricultural and water sector development strategy and policy; and (iii) strengthening national capacity for iterative climate change adaptation planning, implementation and monitoring in the country.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$$3 million (proposed GEF SCCF Funding)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$20.8 million (proposed co-financing, including US$20 million Government of Turkmenistan and US$830,000 UNDP)
Project Details: 

By strengthening the adaptive capacity and reducing the vulnerability of over 40,000 to 50,000 persons (8,000 to 10,000 households) among the pilot daikhan and livestock associations in the Lebap and Dashoguz target regions, the project will help farmers improve the productivity of their farm operations, be better prepared for increasing water scarcity and introduce alternative income sources.

The project will develop and demonstrate a matrix of climate adaptation solutions for further replication outside of the two velayats. It will focus on increasing the resilience of water resources for the most vulnerable and water-stressed communities, which are engaged in non-state agriculture and livestock management and which are unlikely to benefit from government ́s large-scale water supply and storage infrastructure.

The project seeks to support innovation in the project through the testing, demonstration and replication of adaptation practices in the following areas: (i) participatory planning processes that integrates adaptation into agricultural and water investments at the local level; (ii) integration of adaptation approaches at the sectoral policy level in agriculture and waters sectors; (iii) mainstreaming adaptation into the national planning and budget allocation process; (iv) technological innovations for efficient water use, soil and water conservation and adaptive agricultural practices and crop practices; and (v) enhanced responsibilities for water management at the diakhan association level.

The project will be carried out under a National Implementation Modality (NIM). UNDP will act as a senior supplier and the UNDP country office will provide support services to the project at the request of the Ministry of Nature Protection. As a national partner the Ministry of Nature Protection of Turkmenistan will oversee all aspects of project implementation. Other national partners are Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Economy and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. On quarterly basis, Project Management Unit will organize meetings with stakeholders, such as the main farmer and livestock associations, to discuss achievements, challenges faced, corrective steps taken and future corrective actions needed for the implementation of planned activities.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Improved climate related socio-economic outcomes in the targeted agricultural communities in Lebap and Dashoguz velayats through the implementation of community-based adaptation solutions. Achievement of Outcome 1 is supported through the following outputs:

Output 1.1: Participatory vulnerability and adaptation assessments in selected communities to identify priority adaptation solutions;

Output 1.2: Development and implementation of local gender sensitive adaptation plans;

Output 1.3: Implementation of innovations focused on providing additional income and supporting climate UNDP Environmental Finance Services Page 30 resilient livelihoods;

Output 1.4: Participatory mechanisms for implementing and monitoring changes in community climate resilience;

Output 1.5: Dissemination and up-scaling of successful adaptation measures.

Outcome 2: Mainstreamed climate adaptation measures in agricultural and water sector development strategy and policy. Achievement of Outcome 2 is supported through the following outputs:

Ouput 2.1: Capacity development for agriculture and water sector enabling effective adaptation planning with gender considerations;

Ouput 2.2: Guidelines to water and agriculture sector ministries on using gender disaggregated data in planning, conducting specific assessments on the needs of women and using these in sector adaptation planning and budgeting;

Ouput 2.3: Regulation and guidelines for inclusion of adaptation in national and local development planning and budgeting developed and linked to sector based planning, coordination and monitoring processes;

Ouput 2.4: Institutional and legal mechanisms for water resource management integrate key principles of efficient use and climate risk management.

Ouput 2.5: National sectoral planning and rural development investments take account of and address climate change related risks.

Ouput 2.6: Ecosystem services valued and potential impacts of climate change on natural pastures assessed to inform pasture management decision-making

Outcome 3: Strengthened national capacity for iterative climate change adaptation planning, implementation and monitoring. Achievement of Outcome 3 is supported through the following outputs:

Output 3.1: Mechanism for iterative monitoring, reporting and verification of implementation of the mainstreamed adaptation actions established.

Output 3.2: Vulnerability/resilience indicators and protocols for gender-disaggregated data collection, storage, processing and use in planning and decision-making.

Output 3.3: Actions to build the evidence base for robust decision making implemented.

Output 3.4: Communication and outreach strategy to support the medium and long-term adaptation planning of NEPAAM developed and implemented.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Country-level Initiatives: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1: Improved climate related socio-economic outcomes in the targeted agricultural communities in Lebap and Dashoguz velayats through the implementation of community-based adaptation solutions.

Outcome 2: Mainstreamed climate adaptation measures in agricultural and water sector development strategy and policy.

Outcome 3: Strengthened national capacity for iterative climate change adaptation planning, implementation and monitoring.

Promoting Innovative Finance and Community Based Adaptation in Communes Surrounding Community Natural Reserves in Senegal

The "Promoting Innovative Finance and Community Based Adaptation in Communes Surrounding Community Natural Reserves (Ferlo, Niokolo Koba, Bas Delta Senegal, Delta du Saloum) in Senegal" project will work to create financial incentives to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation and support capacity building for vulnerable households and community groups to build holistic responses to climate change.

With US$5.4 million in proposed funding from the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund, the initiative will assist Senegal to pursue a "transformational" pathway towards resilience. In the long term it will empower local institutions to provide adaptation services to vulnerable communities.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The overall project will generate socio-economic benefits at the local level by involving communities in the 203 villages (at least 50,000 households)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$5.4 million proposed GEF-LDCF funding
Co-Financing Total: 
US$16.9 million (US$1.4 million Ministry of Environment and Finance proposed co-financing, US$6.5 million proposed UNDP grant)
Project Details: 

The LDCF-funded initiative will assist Senegal to pursue a "transformational" pathway towards resilience. Under this approach, in the long term, local institutions will be able to provide adaptation services to vulnerable communities.

To achieve the project goals, changes in practices are needed, specifically to establish attractive funding mechanisms , linked to existing local financing systems, to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation, and to provide investments and capacities to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes.

The project will complement the existing baseline by promoting long-term planning on climate changes and facilitating budgeting and establishment of innovative financing mechanisms to support climate change governance at communes’ levels. More specifically, the project will review local development plans (including RNC plans) to (i) integrate climate adaptation priorities and resilience, (ii) set up innovative & sustainable financial mechanisms, (iii) improve the capacity of local credit and saving mutuals to finance adaptation projects and also the performance of local leaders in managing adaptations finances.

The response to climate vulnerability and changes will be oriented toward investing on the restoration of key livelihood resources (natural reserves, pastures, water points, etc.), establishing minimum community based early warning systems and sustaining climate-resilient agro pastoral and diversification activities. Target communities, local government leaders and other supporting institutions, will receive support to build capacity on climate change to inform improved decision making. This is critical for informing the design of feasible, credible and useful adaptation options and support. 

 

This innovative approach allows local government to make changes to planning instruments that affect existing local developments by incorporating climate change considerations. Through the project, communities will have access to funding from a number of competitive grants (public & private) to address adaptation issues.

The coordination arrangement, involving policy makers, extension services, private sector and community based organisations, is a major innovation and will help to articulate institutional communication - both educational and social - at different levels.

The overall project will also generate socio-economic benefits at the local level by involving communities in the 203 villages (at least 50,000 households) in a much more transitional approach in the use of natural resources through the dissemination of practices, technologies and techniques, which are expected to improve the productivity and the resilience of agro-sylvo -pastoral activities.

Long-term benefits are also expected with investment aiming at restoring communities' "Natural Capital," and providing relevant climate information. In term of sustainability , the decentralized entities (councils and villages) will be empowered in implementing adaptation investments, strengthening community organizations in order to ensure that physical infrastructure and other investments are well managed and maintained after the project closure.

Capacity-building initiatives and awareness-raising will achieved through the social and environmental sustainability, and stakeholder involvement will be strengthened through adequate social mobilization and sensitization initiatives (workshops, forums, publications, community radios’ programmes, etc.). In addition, the knowledge base will be improved, and the project will define and implement an adequate system for knowledge management and information sharing.

The natural regions of Ferlo, Niokolo Koba, Bas Delta Senegal, and Delta du Saloum play a key role for livelihoods, as the communities are directly dependent on their natural assets, such as water, pasture, forests and fertile soil for a living.

Recognizing this richness, the communities of 203 villages established about 26 Community Natural Reserves (RNC) as well as nine credit and saving mutuals to improve the living conditions of households, specifically women groups.

However, with the effects climate change, both the natural capital maintained under these RNC and people’s economic assets will reach a tipping point. Indeed, in Senegal, droughts are the result of climate variability that more recently has manifested by a late onset of the rainy season, irregular spatial distribution of rains, and an early end to the rainy season.

Projections of mean annual rainfall averaged over the country show a trend towards decreases, particularly in the wet season. The drastic reductions in water availability at critical times (e.g. in the dry season or in drought years) and at critical locations (e.g. in the more populous areas or where livestock congregates) have direct and catastrophic impact on livelihoods of communities.

Natural grazing grounds in Niokolo Koba & Ferlo will be significantly diminished and livestock watering made difficult under climate change scenarios. This situation leads to localized conflicts between transhumant and sedentary communities, especially during the drought periods, when grazing grounds and water resources are particularly scarce.

Among other predictable impacts, climate change is also expected to result in a marked increase in the incidence and intensity of bushfires in Niokolo Koba & Ferlo. Fire can have catastrophic impacts on livelihoods, notably because of the importance of pastoral resources in target regions . 

In Bas Delta Senegal , most of villages are facing a serious coastal erosion problem; the outer row of fisher folk houses has already been destroyed by the sea and thus abandoned by the population

Finally, in Saloum Delta, the reduction of water table leads to the salinization of agricultural lands. Many valleys in Saloum are now affected by salted water intrusion resulting from reduced rainfall and lack of appropriate storage under changed conditions. Under these conditions, the capacity of communities will remain weak to sustain current efforts in preserving natural capital and increasing economical capital.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - C reate financial incentives linked with local government and communities financing systems to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation

Output 1.1. Identify and integrate climate resilience related performance measures into local development plans, including community plans

Output 1.2. Set up sustainable financial mechanisms at sub-national level (e.g. Local Resilience budget lines/funds, Eco taxes, etc.) to attract climate finance

Output 1.3. Sustainability & performance of the nine community based credit and saving mutuals improved to attract, manage and finance priority adaptation measures identified by vulnerable communities

Output 1.4. Capacity of communes and villages leaders developed to (i) access incremental funding from non-governmental sour ces, (ii) manage and (iii) monitor adaptation investments

Outcome 2 - Investments and capacities provided to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes

Output 2.1. Investments for structural adaptation measures channelled trough local budget (e.g. restoration of natural reserves/pastoral areas/water points, research development, Early Warning Systems, management of supply chains, etc.

Output 2.2. Create revolving investment funds, through credit & saving mutuals, for profitable community based climate resilient agro-pastoral investments and other diversification activities

Output 2.3. Community based organisation groups (women, youth and other producers) provided with capacity to (i) understand climate impacts; (ii) identify resilient growth production areas, (ii) manage adaptation initiatives (iii) access to rural finance, and (iv) improve entrepreneurship and organizational skills

Output 2.4. Mechanisms for capturing and dissemination of key experiences and good practices established for replication.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
GEF
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - C reate financial incentives linked with local government and communities financing systems to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation

Outcome 2 - Investments and capacities provided to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes

Enhancing Climate Resilience of the Vulnerable Communities and Ecosystems in Somalia

With financing from the Global Environment Facility’s (GEF) Least Developed Country Countries Fund, the Federal Government of Somalia, in partnership with UNDP, is working to bolster the resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems to climate change. The project is working in semi-autonomous states in Somalia: South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland, which unilaterally declared itself an independent republic in 1991. The project is working to respond to the adverse impacts of climate change and improve the adaptive capacity of vulnerable farmers in pilot areas, and the ecosystems on which they depend.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the selected areas in South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland - especially small-scale farmers
Funding Source: 

UNDP Somalia Climate Resilience Project - Documentary Film

UNDP under its Enhancing Climate Change Resilience (CCR) project of the Poverty Reduction and Environment Protection Programme (PREP), in partnership with the Somali Government, have initiated innovative project activities aimed at enhancing the climate resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems. The project also seeks to address some of the underlying drivers of conflict by empowering both the concerned National and Civil Society institutions, as well as the women, men and children from the most vulnerable communities.

Financing Amount: 
8,000,000 USD
Co-Financing Total: 
64,820,000 USD
Project Details: 

Green shoots of peace and development are emerging in Somalia, after a particularly difficult period of instability. UNDP is at the forefront to help the people of Somalia to recover from years of conflict, while setting the country on the path to sustainable development. In recent years, Somalia has experienced changes in weather and climate that are affecting the country’s economic and social development. Facing increasing uncertainty for seasonal and annual rainfall levels, rising surface temperatures, sea level rise, and the loss of lives and livelihoods dependent on fragile or over-exploited ecosystems and natural resources, there is concern that future climate changes could exacerbate displacement in the region and intensify conflict over scarce natural resources, including water.

Approximately 70% of Somalis are dependent on climate-sensitive agriculture and pastoralism. As floods and droughts become more severe and frequent in Somalia, there is a need to find approaches that can reduce the sensitivity of farmers and pastoralists to increasing rainfall variability. To address these issues, LDCF financing will be used to support ministries, districts, NGOs/CBOs to integrate climate change risks in Natural Resource Management and disaster preparedness. Climate risk management will be institutionalized from national to local levels. CBOs will be revitalized to take the lead on implementing community-based Ecosystem-based flood preparedness and other adaptation measures.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Signature Programmes: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Component 1: Enhancing Policies, Institutional Frameworks and Government Capacities

1.1 Policies, plans and tools reviewed, revised, developed, adopted and implemented by government to mainstream and enhance adaptive capacity and mitigate the risks of climate change on vulnerable communities and critical ecosystem services

Component 2: Piloting Ecosystem Based Adaptation strategies

2.1 Models of community and ecosystem resilience developed and implemented in pilot areas selected in consultation with government and community stakeholders.

Project Dates: 
2014 to 2019

Upscaling Community-Based Adaptation in Ethiopia

The "Upscaling Community-Based Adaptation in Ethiopia" project will work to empower communities to plan and implement adaptation interventions in a deliberate and proactive manner, reducing reliance on the Government of Ethiopia to provide already scarce resources for climate change adaptation. The proposed five-year project will benefit from a US$8.8 million grant from the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Country Fund. The project builds on the successes of the Promoting Autonomous Adaptation at the Community Level in Ethiopia Project.

Building community self-reliance will enable project participants to tailor adaptation tools and technologies to  specific needs. At the local level, new technologies – or traditional technologies used in new ways – will be promoted to ensure that productivity and sustainability of livelihoods are maintained under a range of future climate change scenarios. These adaptation actions and associated technologies or practices will build on the natural resilience and innovativeness of Ethiopian communities to build their self-reliance and capacity to continue the adaptive process iteratively.

More specifically, an effective adaptation solution for vulnerable communities involves the availability of seasonal forecasts and assistance in interpretation of forecasts for implementation in their respective livelihood measures. Through forecasts and climate information services, individuals are able to make informed decisions and take advanced adaptive actions for the coming season. Woreda and urban communities need to be trained in the use of climate information as well as mobilized to plan and implement the most effective adaptation measures. Such adaptation strategies as climate-smart conservation agriculture, integrated and diversified farming systems, improved management of rangelands and other ecosystems, urban diversification of livelihood options are all in combination critical elements for a long-term adaptation solution designed for the unique risks and vulnerabilities of Ethiopia.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.8 million proposed GEF-LDCF Grant
Co-Financing Total: 
US$29 million proposed cofinancing (US$27 million World Bank, US$2 million GiZ)
Project Details: 

 

The changes in Ethiopia’s climate are anticipated to result in a number of negative impacts on vulnerable communities, including droughts and floods. The impacts of past droughts and climatic changes have been particularly detrimental to Ethiopia’s agricultural sector. For example, seven major droughts have occurred over the past 25 years, five of which have resulted in famine. Furthermore, since 1988 Ethiopia has experienced six major floods. The number of flooding events and associated damages increased between 1996 and 2006.

At present, Ethiopia is experiencing one of the most severe droughts of the last 30 years brought on by El Niño events in 2015. The drought is impacting on the livelihoods of 10 million people, namely through food insecurity where the population has become reliant on humanitarian support through food aid. This has left 2.7 million people with malnutrition and 2.1 million without access to safe drinking water. In addition, the drought is causing losses to livestock and decreased agricultural production owing to crop failure.

Climate change is affecting sustainable development in Ethiopia. With a large part of the nation's agricultural production relying on rain-fed farming, the livelihoods of the majority of the population are sensitive to climate-related shocks, including drought and flooding. Climate change is likely  exacerbate the impacts of degradation of the country’s environmental resources – including arable land, water, pasture and forest – with connected impacts on Ethiopia’s food and water securities. Consequently, Ethiopian communities in both rural and urban settings will be impacted by this predicted climate change variability.

Currently, 8.2 million people are already considered “chronically” food insecure in Ethiopia, with 6.7 million people facing food insecurity. Both categories are characterised by a weak resilience to withstand climate-related shocks, such as severe droughts. Addressing climate change is of critical importance in Ethiopia as the economy remains reliant on: i) climate-sensitive agriculture and natural resources management; ii) rainfall; and iii) natural resource dependent energy – biomass and hydropower. Recent assessments have estimated that economic growth could decrease by up to 2.5% per year unless capacity building and climate change adaptation measures are implemented. Further to this, climate change is expected to further impact Ethiopia’s income inequality, affecting both rural and urban communities.

The long‑term preferred solution is for adaptation to be an integral part of Ethiopian livelihoods, specifically among vulnerable communities. The proposed project will empower communities to plan and implement adaptation interventions in a deliberate and proactive manner, reducing reliance on the Government of Ethiopia to provide already scarce resources for climate change adaptation. Building community self-reliance will enable them to tailor adaptation tools and technologies to their specific needs. At the local level, new technologies – or traditional technologies used in new ways – will be promoted to ensure that productivity and sustainability of livelihoods are maintained under a range of future climate change scenarios. These adaptation actions and associated technologies or practices will build on the natural resilience and innovativeness of Ethiopian communities to build their self-reliance and capacity to continue the adaptive process iteratively.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Ouctome 1 - Strengthened institutional and technical capacity for coordination of climate‑resilient planning and investment

Output 1.1. Training provided on tools and methodologies for gender-sensitive climate vulnerability and risk assessments and gender-responsive adaptation planning at the kebele, woreda and city levels.

Output 1.2. Integrated climate change adaptation/disaster risk reduction plans – with gender action plans – developed at the regional, city and local levels for key sectors.

Outcome 2 - Access to climate-smart technologies and practices for cost-effective adaptation is enhanced

Output 2.1. Training-of-trainers undertaken for decision‑makers and technical staff in targeted woredas and cities on implementation of gender-sensitive adaptation technologies tailored to local socio-economic and environmental contexts, including using climate data and forecasts to inform adaptation interventions at the community level.

Output 2.2. Targeted training to farmers in selected woredas on climate-smart agricultural practices, including the use of seasonal forecasts and climate advisories in their farming decisions.

Output 2.4. Localised weather and climate advisories disseminated to provide real time agro-meteorological information to farmers, pastoralists and local decision‑makers.

Output 2.5. Adaptation technologies and climate-smart agricultural practices introduced and scaled in targeted woredas and cities.

Outcome 3 - Knowledge management system to store and disseminate the best adaptive practices for further upscaling and replication established

Output 3.1. Woreda learning centres established to share lessons learned and best practices outside of targeted communities.

Output 3.2. Cost-benefit analyses of the field-demonstrated adaptation measures to inform strategies and action plans.

Output 3.3. Knowledge-sharing mechanisms developed to ensure that best practices and knowledge generated through this and other initiatives is documented for replication and upscaling.

Output 3.4. Awareness-raising campaigns undertaken on climate risks and adaptation options for government staff and local communities.

Output 3.5. Monitoring and evaluation conducted.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Ouctome 1 - Strengthened institutional and technical capacity for coordination of climate‑resilient planning and investment

Outcome 2 - Access to climate-smart technologies and practices for cost-effective adaptation is enhanced

Outcome 3 - Knowledge management system to store and disseminate the best adaptive practices for further upscaling and replication established

Planning and Financing Adaptation in Niger

The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Niger to develop a project proposal for a new US$9 million grant proposal for the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund. The proposed "Planning and Financing Adaptation in Niger" project will include US$27 million in co-financing. The project looks to integrate climate change adaptation into relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national and local levels, promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transforms access to water to an income-generating opportunity, increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities, and establish an evidence-based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$9 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$27 million (proposed co-financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Integrate climate change adaptation in relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national (2020-2035 SDDCI, CC Strategy, IWRM, multiannual/annual budget frameworks) and local levels

Outcome 2 - Promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transform access to water to an income-generating opportunity and increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities

Outcome 3 - Establish an evidence based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Integrate climate change adaptation in relevant budgeting and planning frameworks at national (2020-2035 SDDCI, CC Strategy, IWRM, multiannual/annual budget frameworks) and local levels

Outcome 2 - Promote the mass dissemination of economically sustainable hybrid village water systems and multipurpose infrastructure that transform access to water to an income-generating opportunity and increase disaster risks preparedness of vulnerable communities

Outcome 3 - Establish an evidence based knowledge system to inform policies and investments on adaptation


Scaling-up of Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF) risk reduction in Northern Pakistan

Rising temperatures have melted glaciers, creating glacial lakes in Northern Pakistan. These carry the risk of outburst flooding events, threatening over 7 million people. Early warning systems, engineering structures and disaster management policies will reduce risk, protecting local communities and providing early warning of devastating flood events.

The melting of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalayan glaciers in Northern Pakistan due to rising temperatures have created 3,044 glacial lakes in the federally-administered territory of Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) and the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP). It is estimated that 33 of these glacial lakes are hazardous and likely to result in glacial lake outburst floods. Such flooding releases millions of cubic metres of water and debris in just a few hours, resulting in the loss of lives, destruction of property and infrastructure, and severe damage to livelihoods in some of the most remote areas of Pakistan.

In response to these risks, the 
"Scaling-up of Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF) risk reduction in Northern Pakistan" project will build 250 engineering structures including damns, ponds, spill ways, tree plantation and drainage to reduce risk. At the same time, the development of disaster management policies and the introduction of weather monitoring stations, flood gauges, hydrological modelling and early warning systems will increase the ability to respond rapidly to flood scenarios.

 

Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
29 million people
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$37 million (GCF financing according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$500,000 (Government of Gilgit - Baltistan according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

The melting of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalayan glaciers in Northern Pakistan due to rising temperatures has created 3,044 glacial lakes in the federally-administered territory of Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) and the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP). It is estimated that 33 of these glacial lakes are hazardous and likely to result in glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Such outbursts have occurred in the past and when they do, millions of cubic metres of water and debris is released in a few hours, resulting in the loss of lives, destruction of property and infrastructure, and severe damage to livelihoods in some of the most remote areas of Pakistan. Currently 7,101,000 people remain at risk in GB and KP. Most recently, in July 2015, over 280,000 people in GB and KP were affected, a combination of heavy rains and GLOFs.

At present, the country faces a critical gap in technical and technological capacity to monitor the status of glaciers through hydrological monitoring and forecasting. Current early warning systems (EWS) do not have the capacity to support the management of risks posed by rising water levels in the lakes, including failure to issue early warnings to communities. The design and implementation of medium- and long-term disaster management policies and risk reduction and preparedness plans are also not fully geared to deal with the specifics of GLOF threats. 

The Government of Pakistan has recognized the threat from GLOFs in its National Climate Change Policy and in its National Determined Contribution to monitor changes in glacier volumes and related GLOFs. The Government of Pakistan is seeking GCF resources to upscale ongoing initiatives on early warning systems and small, locally-sourced infrastructure to protect communities from GLOF risks. The interventions proposed for scale up by this project will be based on activities implemented in two districts on a trial basis that have proven to be impactful. In particular, engineering structures (i.e. gabion walls) have been constructed; automatic weather stations, rain gauge and discharge equipment were installed to support rural communities to avoid human and material losses from GLOF events. The proposed GCF project will expand coverage to twelve districts in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Gilgit-Baltistan provinces. The proposed project will strengthen the technical capacity of sub-national decision makers to integrate climate change and disaster risk management into medium- and long-term development planning processes.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Strengthened sub-national institutional capacities to plan and implement climate change -resilient development pathways

This output responds to the need for systematic integration of GLOF risk management into the processes, policies and plans of institutions that have a stake in avoiding human and material losses from GLOF events in vulnerable areas in the Departments of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and Gilgit-Baltistan (GB). GCF resources will be used to strengthen the capabilities of local level institutions (Disaster Risk Management, Agriculture, Livestock and Water sector in the Departments of GB and KP and federal level institutions (Ministry of Kashmir Affairs, Ministry of Environment and National Disaster Management Authority) to incorporate climate change adaptation considerations into development plans in GB and KP. The incorporation of climate change adaptation measures into the planning instruments will also be based on progress made at the national level under NCCP and by other regions in including climate change measures in sectoral, territorial, and environmental planning instruments. More specifically, the project will make use of the lessons learned from the recently completed UNDP/Adaptation Fund supported project: “Reducing Risks and Vulnerabilities from Glacier Lake Outburst Floods in Northern Pakistan”. In addition, GCF resources will be used to promote the inclusion of information generated from early warning systems and hydrological modeling (Output 2) to generate flood scenarios that then can better inform local development plans and, by extension, budgeting.

Output 2: Community-based EWS and long-term measures are up-scaled to increase communities’ adaptive capacity

A key result that GCF resources will finance focuses on the scaling up of interventions that have been tested with other financing to increase adaptive capacity of communities in target valleys. GCF resources will expand the climate information surveillance and discharge measuring network in the region. GCF resources will be used to procure and install 50 automatic weather stations (AWS) and 408 river discharge gauges/sensors. These monitoring instruments will provide the requisite data to conduct hydrological modeling to generate flood risk scenarios that will feed into a flood early warning system to enable the dissemination of flashflood warning signals on a 24-hour basis generated by PMD through cellphones. AWS and river discharge sensors will provide information to capacitate village hazard watch groups that will be part of a local-level early warning system. Small-scale hard adaptation structures will be constructed (gabion walls, spillways, check dams) to protect human lives and household’s assets in combination with bioengineering interventions to stabilize slopes slides, reducing the risk of debris slides. In Pakistan EIAs are not required for smaller infrastructure projects. The protective capability of these structures will be amplified by additional resources channeled to the communities ex ante and following a GLOF event through the scale up of already established, revolving community-based disaster risk management fund. In addition, ecosystem-based adaptation interventions will be promoted in order to increase resilience against GLOFs events while supporting livelihoods.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project-level monitoring and evaluation will be undertaken in compliance with the UNDP POPP and the UNDP Evaluation Policy. UNDP will perform monitoring and reporting throughout the Reporting Period in accordance with the AMA. UNDP has country presence and capacity to perform such functions. In the event of any additional post-implementation obligations over and above the AMA, UNDP will discuss and agree these with the GCF Secretariat in the final year of the implementation period.

The primary responsibility for day-to-day project monitoring and implementation rests with the Project Manager. The Project Manager will develop annual work plans to ensure the efficient implementation of the project. The Project Manager will inform the Project Board and the UNDP Country Office of any delays or difficulties during implementation, including the implementation of the M&E plan, so that the appropriate support and corrective measures can be adopted. The Project Manager will also ensure that all project staff maintain a high level of transparency, responsibility and accountability in monitoring and reporting project results.  

The UNDP Country Office will support the Project Manager as needed, including through annual supervision missions. The UNDP Country Office is responsible for complying with UNDP project-level M&E requirements as outlined in the UNDP POPP. Additional M&E and implementation quality assurance and troubleshooting support will be provided by the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor as needed. The project target groups and stakeholders including the NDA Focal Point will be involved as much as possible in project-level M&E. 

A project inception workshop will be held after the UNDP project document has been signed by all relevant parties to: a) re-orient project stakeholders to the project strategy and discuss any changes in the overall context that influence project implementation; b) discuss the roles and responsibilities of the project team, including reporting and communication lines and conflict resolution mechanisms; c) review the results framework and discuss reporting, monitoring and evaluation roles and responsibilities and finalize the M&E plan; d) review financial reporting procedures and mandatory requirements, and agree on the arrangements for the annual audit; e) plan and schedule Project Board meetings and finalize the first year annual work plan. The Project Manager will prepare the inception report no later than one month after the inception workshop. The final inception report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board.   

 

The Project Manager, the UNDP Country Office, and the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor will provide objective input to the annual Project Implementation Report (PIR) for each year of project implementation.  The Project Manager will ensure that the indicators included in the project results framework are monitored annually well in advance of the PIR submission deadline and will objectively report progress in the Development Objective tab of the PIR.  The annual PIR will be shared with the project board and other stakeholders.  The UNDP Country Office will coordinate the input of the NDA Focal Point and other stakeholders to the PIR.  The quality rating of the previous year’s PIR will be used to inform the preparation of the next PIR.  The final project PIR along with the terminal evaluation report and corresponding management response will serve as the final project report package.   

An independent mid-term review process will be undertaken and the findings and responses outlined in the management response will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s duration. The terms of reference, the review process and the final MTR report will follow the standard templates and guidance available on the UNDP Evaluation Resource Center. The final MTR report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board. The final MTR report will be available in English. 

 

An independent terminal evaluation (TE) will take place no later than three months prior to operational closure of the project.  The terms of reference, the review process and the final TE report will follow the standard templates and guidance available on the UNDP Evaluation Resource Center. The final TE report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board. The TE report will be available in English. 

The UNDP Country Office will include the planned project terminal evaluation in the UNDP Country Office evaluation plan, and will upload the final terminal evaluation report in English and the management response to the public UNDP Evaluation Resource Centre (ERC) (http://erc.undp.org).  Once uploaded to the ERC, the UNDP Independent Evaluation Office will undertake a quality assessment and validate the findings and ratings in the TE report, and rate the quality of the TE report.  

The UNDP Country Office will retain all M&E records for this project for up to seven years after project financial closure in order to support ex-post evaluations.

A detailed M&E budget, monitoring plan and evaluation plan will be included in the UNDP project document.  UNDP will perform monitoring and reporting throughout the reporting period in accordance with the AMA and Funded Activity Agreement (FAA).  UNDP has country presence and capacity to perform such functions.  In the event of any additional post-implementation obligations over and above the AMA, UNDP will discuss and agree these with the GCF Secretariat in the final year of the project and will prepare a post-implementation monitoring plan and budget for approval by the GCF Board as necessary.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
Regional Technical Advisor in Climate Change Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Strengthened sub-national institutional capacities to plan and implement climate change-resilient development pathways

Output 2: Community-based EWS and long-term measures are up-scaled to increase communities’ adaptive capacity

Madagascar: Enhancing the Adaptation Capacities and Resilience to Climate Change in Rural Communities in Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy, and Atsimo Andrefana

The Improving Adaptation and Resilience to Address Climate Change in the Rural Communities of Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy and Atsimo Andrefana project is designed to reduce the vulnerability of populations in Madagascar facing the adverse effects of climate change and severe weather events.

Spread over five years with approximately US$5 million in funding from the Global Environment Facility’s Least Developed Country Fund, the US$61 million project aims to lift the barriers identified in the target areas, such as human pressure on natural resources, lack of financial and technical resources, limited access to credit, limited water and sanitation infrastructure, lack of agro-meteorological and climatic information, lack of awareness among decision-makers as well as lack of coordination between the most affected sectors.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (46.757812484438 -18.190389159906)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The project will directly train at least 80 facilitators and 3,000 farmers through the FFSs.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$61 million total, with US$5 million from GEF LDCF per ProDoc 21 January 2016
Project Details: 

In Madagascar, the economic sectors most affected by the harmful effects of climate change are agriculture, livestock, forestry, water resources, fishing and health. To enjoy sustainable livelihoods in a context of climate change, the local populations of the Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy and Atsimo Andrefana regions must find a way to strengthen their adaptation and resilience capacities, which is the goal set by the proposed project. To this end, several barriers must be overcome, such as anthropic pressure on natural resources, the lack of financial and technical capacities, the difficult access to credit and inputs, the lack of water and sanitation infrastructures, the lack of agro-meteorological and climate information to inform climate change adaptation decision processes, the lack of awareness regarding climate change impacts and potential adaptation options on the part of decision-makers and the lack of coordination for adaptation interventions among sectors.

This project serves to address these various obstacles by achieving three main outcomes. The first outcome aims to increase the awareness and strengthen the capacities of decision-makers, technicians and vulnerable communities in terms of Climate Change Adaptation (CCA). This awareness-raising support will contributed to build a solid political framework. This first outcome will enable setting up the institutional, structural and technical foundations needed to disseminate and appropriate adaptation measures and technologies. The second outcome aims to ensure the collection and production of reliable climate and meteorological information. Disseminating this information in a manner that meets the needs of end users will foster informed decision-making in regards to climate and meteorological conditions. Finally, the third outcome aims to transfer adaptation measures, options and technologies to vulnerable communities in the selected regions using a participatory approach, building on the strengthened capacities achieved through the first component, and the agro-meteorological information and forecasts produced through the second component.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes

1. The institutional and technical adaptation capacities of ministries in charge of agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation of local governments of the regions of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo Andrefana, Analamanga, and Atsinanana are strenghtened

2. Meteorological, climate and socio economic information are packaged into decision support information and disseminated to relevant stakeholders of the line ministries and communities

3. Adaptation measures including technologies are implemented by communities in Androy, Anosy, Atsimo Andrefana, Analamanga, and Atsinanana

Expected Outputs:

1.1: A training program for management of climate risk for vulnerable communities livelihoods and living conditions is designed and implemented for policy decision makers, senior executives and technicians of ministries in charge of agriculture, livestock, water, and sanitation and of local governments, NGOs and community based organizations (CBOs) supporting the rural development of the regions of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo Andrefana

1.2: The local development plans for the regions of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo Andrefana, Atsinanana, and Anamalanga and related budgeting frameworks are revised to integrate climate risks and incentives to advance adaptation

1.3: The water and sanitation development plans for the Watersheds of the South, Center and East, as well as the municipal plans for developing access to sanitation and water (PCDEA) of the communes of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo Andrefana, Atsinanana, and Anamalanga and their budgets as well as the National Program for Access to Drinking Water and Sanitation (PNAEPA), are revised so as to integrate climate risks and relevant adaptation options

1.4: Key public policy frameworks including the National Seed Strategy (DSNS) and the National Strategy for Agricultural and Rural Training (SNFAR) and the National Reforestation Strategy are revised to integrate climate change

2.1: Installation of 2 agrometeorological stations in Ampanihy and Amboasary-Sud, 2 synoptic stations in Betroka and Faux-Cap and 3 climatological stations in Betroka, Beroroha, and Sakaraha. and creation of a network of 5 hydrometric stations in the watershed of Menarandra, and of 12 in the watershed of Mandrare, \of two synoptic stations in Betroka and Faux Cap and of three auxiliary climate stations in Betroka, Beroroha, and Sakaraha

2.2: A training program is designed and implemented for the technicians of the Meteorology Directorate, the Ministry of Agriculture, Agencies for watersheds for the South, Center, and East and the Directorate of Disaster Management to enable them to analyze climate and weather data in an integrated manner with key socio-economic and biophysical data and generate policy relevant for key sector based planning and management

2.3: A system for producing and disseminating decision making support information to manage disasters and climate risks, combining data on weather condition (including satellite surveillance data), climate projections, natural resources development, social and economic conditions (livelihood, living conditions, vulnerability, etc… climate change impact and adaptation) is designed, institutionalized, and is put into operation

3.1: Climate resilient Agrosylvopastoral technologies, including, but not limited to, the use of crop calendar and other climate and weather condition information, drought tolerant/ shorter cycle seeds, zebus species and other input and methods for managing soil fertility and humidity are demonstrated with 3,000 farmers from the 30 most vulnerable communities

3.2: Dredging sewage and rainwater canals, high intensity of labor force works, and other low-cost measures to fight against the silting of canals, the raising of contours and/or the strengthening of vulnerable points of the water and sanitation infrastructures to strengthen the vulnerable community based water supply and sanitation systems in the regions of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo, Andrefana, Analamanga, and Atsinanana is strengthened in response to climate change and variability

3.3: Climate resilient agricultural advisory support groups made up of extension workers from agriculture support centers (CSAs) and members of communities are established and operationalized to provide climate resilient agriculture advisory support to the vulnerable communities of the regions of Androy, Anosy, Atsimo, Andrefana, Analamanga, and Atsinanana

3.4: A sustainable climate resilient agricultural input supply chain, laying on seed growers groups, NGOs and CBOs is established.

3.5: A public private partnership aiming at fostering and enabling the combination of public and private sector contribution in the provision of institutional, financial and technical support for the integration of climate risks and adaptation options in the agricultural, water and sanitation sectors in Madagascar

3.6: Adapted financial credits products , to finance communities to make climate change adaptation and resilient alternatives incomes generating activities (IGAs) are developed by Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) networks

Contacts: 
Henry Rene Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Information in French / Informations en français: 

Face au changement climatique, renforcer les capacités d’adaptation et de résilience des communautés rurales à Madagascar

Lancement du projet « Amélioration des capacités d’adaptation et de résilience face au changement climatique dans les communautés rurales à Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy et Atsimo Andrefana »

Antsirabe, le 27 janvier 2017 : Afin de réduire la vulnérabilité des populations face aux effets néfastes et pervers du changement climatique et des phénomènes météorologiques, le PNUD a procédé au lancement à Antsirabe du projet « Amélioration des capacités d’adaptation et de résilience face au changement climatique dans les communautés rurales à Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy et Atsimo Andrefana ». 

Etalé sur cinq (5) ans, le projet d’une hauteur de 61 millions de dollars américains bénéficie d'un financement d'environ 5 millions de dollars provenant du Fonds pour les pays les moins avancés du Fonds pour l'environnement mondial (FEM). Les contributions nationales proviennent des ministères de l'agriculture, de l'élevage, des transports et de la météorologie, de l'environnement, de l'écologie, de la mer et des forêts. Les contributions du PNUD et de L'UNICEF sont respectivement de 5 millions et de 2,3 millions de dollars.

Ce projet, mis en œuvre par le PNUD et en partenariat avec l’UNICEF, a pour objectif de lever les barrières identifiées dans les zones ciblées à savoir la pression anthropique sur les ressources naturelles, le manque de ressources financières et techniques, la difficulté d’accès aux crédits, intrants, et infrastructures d’eau et assainissement, manque d’informations agro-météorologiques et climatiques, le manque de sensibilisation des décideurs et de coordination entre secteurs les plus affectés.

Afin de relever ces défis, les activités du projet seront centrées autour de la réalisation des trois (3) produits suivants :

- La mise en place des bases institutionnelles, structurelles et techniques nécessaires à la diffusion et à l’appropriation de mesures et technologies d’adaptation ;

- La collecte et la production d’informations climatiques et météorologiques fiables afin de permettre une prise de décision éclairée vis-à-vis des conditions climatiques et météorologiques ;

- Le transfert des mesures, options et technologies d’adaptation nécessaires aux communautés vulnérables des communes sélectionnées.

« Surmonter les catastrophes climatiques comme les cyclones, les inondations ou encore la sècheresse ne doit pas être une option mais une nécessité si on veut faire face à l’extrême pauvreté  et permettre au peuple malagasy de vivre dignement. La réponse proposée par le PNUD sur requête expresse du Gouvernement et ce, en partenariat avec les communautés et les autorités régionales et locales a été la formulation de ce projet que nous lançons ce jour.» a précisé Marie DIMOND, Représentante résidente adjointe du PNUD, lors de la cérémonie de lancement regroupant l’Unicef, les représentants du Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Ecologie et des Forets (MEEF) ainsi que des partenaires gouvernementaux, techniques et financiers.

Il convient de souligner que le projet « Amélioration des capacités d’adaptation et de résilience face au changement climatique dans les communautés rurales à Analamanga, Atsinanana, Androy, Anosy et Atsimo Andrefana » est une des illustrations du positionnement du PNUD pour 2017 qui est la focalisation des efforts financiers et techniques dans le relèvement et la résilience des populations afin de rompre le cycle de vulnérabilité à Madagascar.

Point focal information : Ramatoulaye MOUSSA MAZOU – Chargée de communication PNUD Madagascar - ramatoulaye.moussa@undp.org. Tel : +261 32 23 467 93

Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1. The establishment of the institutional, structural and technical bases necessary for the dissemination and appropriation of adaptation measures and technologies.

Output 2. The collection and production of reliable climate and weather information to enable informed decision-making with respect  to climatic and meteorological conditions.

Output 3. The transfer of adaptation measures, options and technologies required by vulnerable communities in the selected areas.

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2022

Reducing the Vulnerability of Cambodian Rural Livelihoods through Enhanced sub-national Climate Change Planning and Execution of Priority Actions

Cambodia is one of the poorest nations in South-East Asia. Approximately 70% of Cambodian households derive all or an important part of their income from agriculture and the majority of agricultural production is dependent on the monsoon rain and natural floods/recession of the Tonle Sap River and Lake. Climate change is likely to disrupt the natural cycle of the monsoonal system and the hydrological function of the interconnected Mekong-Tonle Sap River drainage system and therefore cause a significant impact on the livelihood and welfare of rural Cambodians.

This project has been designed to reduce the vulnerability of rural Cambodians, especially land-poor, landless and/or women-headed households. This will be achieved through investments in small-scale water management infrastructure, technical assistance to resilient agricultural practices, and capacity building support, especially targeting poor women, for improved food production in home gardens. Importantly, these services will be delivered by sub-national administrations (communes, districts and provinces) with a view to strengthen their overall capacity to plan, design and deliver public services for resilience building. The objective of the project, therefore, is to improve sub-national administration systems affecting investments in rural livelihoods through climate sensitive planning, budgeting and execution. 

Outcome 1, Climate Sensitive Planning, Budgeting and Execution at Sub-National Level Strengthened, builds on the existing system of development planning at District and Commune levels. In particular, mainstreaming of climate change adaptation in the plans and investment programmes of ten Districts and their constituent Communes will be supported. Technical capacity for climate sensitive agriculture extension and for planning and implementation of climate resilient infrastructure investments will also be developed.

Outcome 2, Resilience of Livelihoods of the most vulnerable improved against erratic rainfall, floods and droughts, will facilitate investments in small scale water management infrastructure which will contribute to resilient agricultural production, in particular by overcoming unpredictable rainfall during the wet season. Beneficiaries will be members of vulnerable communities identified through the sub-national planning process and a detailed, participatory Farmer Needs Assessment will be carried out to identify suitable improvements to resilient agricultural livelihoods. Groups of poor and vulnerable women will be assisted to develop livelihood activities requiring only limited amounts of land and will receive complementary support for social capital building activities including leadership training and formation of savings groups.

Outcome 3, Enabling environment is enhanced at sub-national level to attract and manage greater volume of climate change adaptation finance for building resilience of rural livelihoods, will result in an improved system of performance assessment for climate change adaptation by sub-national governments, linked to the Performance Based Climate Resilience Grant awards that will co-finance infrastructure investments under Outcome 2. The capacity of the sub-national administrations to monitor, evaluate and plan improvements in capacity and performance for climate change adaptation will be strengthened.

The Ministry of Environment of the Royal Government of Cambodia will be the Implementing Partner, with a number of key technical Ministries providing support which will be coordinated through a Technical Advisory Group. To ensure cross-sectoral integration, responsiveness to local needs and sustainability, sub-national activities of the Project will be integrated with the NP-SNDD under the coordination of NCDD-S. The Project will be implemented in 89 Communes and ten Districts of Siem Reap and Kampong Thom Provinces over a four year period beginning in 2015.

 

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (104.612 17.1595)
Funding Source: 
Location: 

Programme Support for Climate Change Adaptation in the Vulnerable Regions of Mopti and Timbuktu

The "Programme Support for Climate Change Adaptation in the Vulnerable Regions of Mopti and Timbuktu" project in Mali will work to increase the resilience of vulnerable communities and their adaptive capacity to climate change in the regions of Mopti and Timbuktu, including the Faguibine system zone.

Located in the Sahel of West Africa, Mali has a dry climate with 65% of its territory under semi-desert and desert conditions. Climate change is expected to increase the variability and the incidence of extreme weather events, such as droughts, floods, intense rainfall events. Without improved planning and management and particularly improved water management, climate change will destroy crops and property, and lead to greater degradation of already fragile soils. Regardless of whether there is an increase or decrease in precipitation, increased temperatures will cause greater evapo-transpiration, which will lead to drier soils in many areas and a corresponding decrease in water availability.

The programme will generate clear adaptation benefits that will assist Mali to make the transition towards climate resilient food security through:

(i) enhanced ability of small farmers and pastoralists to cope with increasing climate variability;

(ii) systematic integration of the risks associated with climate change, including variability into key natural resources, water and agriculture development policies, plans and legislation; and

(iii) strengthened institutional capacity to prepare and respond to climate change threats on water and food production systems.

Adaptation benefits will also result from the catalytic and innovative nature of the programme and the valuable lessons learnt and information generated. By its simultaneous focus on enhancing food security, promoting resilient rural household livelihoods, rehabilitation of water systems, and facilitating access to adaptation technologies, the programme brings together the crucial elements needed for demonstrating climate-proofing and fostering a paradigm shift in providing holistic adaptation beyond a merely sectoral approach in Mali.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-3.57056 15.5997)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme will directly benefit about 28,000 households in the selected regions. Given average household sizes of around five people, this will translate to about 140,000 direct beneficiaries. Beneficiaries include vulnerable households, communities, communes and local elected governments, and the national government and decentralized structures.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.5 million (Adaptation Fund)
Project Details: 

Mali experiences severe recurrent shocks particularly droughts, locust infestation and irregular rainfalls causing reduction in agricultural yields and water resources severely affecting the livelihoods of the people and national development. There are also extreme climate events such as flooding.

The NAPA assessment, for example, concluded that climate change is likely to cause significant losses in crop production (like millet, sorghum, maize and rice) by 2025 and 2050. This demonstrate that farming systems in Mali are extremely vulnerable to climate change and climate variability.

The root causes of vulnerability include significant reliance on rain-fed production systems, ongoing practices of crop and livestock selections, water resource management, rangeland management, drought ill-preparedness, and household income generation that are not compatible with increasing impacts of climate change.

Other drivers of vulnerability include: (i) increasing demographic trends e.g. climate-induced refugee movements into regions least affected by drought, which cause intense pressure on productive arable lands; (ii) shortage of basic investment in market instruments in rural areas (such as access to credit, limited market outlets, etc.); and (iii) lack of land tenure regulation that hinders development of the the sector.

In the context of the above root causes , the performance of production systems (agriculture, fisheries, livestock, forestry, etc.) and the capacity to adapt are limited.

The National Policy, Strategy and Action Plan on Climate Change for Mali (AEDD 2011) clearly states government recognition of the problem of climate change by this problem statement:

"In Mali, climate change threatens key sectors of the economy: Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries, Forestry, Energy, Health, and Infrastructure. Without an organized response and anticipated level of governance of these sectors to address these challenges, climate change could be very threatening on the development of Mali."

There is a high level of uncertainty associated in climate projections for Mali, and West Africa in general, particularly for changes in precipitation.In the Third Assessment Report (TAR) of the IPCC, general circulation model simulations suggest a future warming of 0.2 degrees C per decade (low warming scenario) to more than 0.5 degrees C ( high warming scenario) by 2030. While some models predict a decrease in precipitation, others suggest increased rainfall under the most rapid global change scenario. No clear outcome regarding future climatology has emerged for the Sahel region.

Models do agree, however, on the increased unpredictability of rainfall, and this is consistent with local observations. 

This climate variability threatens to undermine Mali's ability to acheive development goals, reduce poverty, improve food security and build a resilient nation.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Increased climate change resilience of local water systems in Mopti and Timbuktu regions

Outcome 2 - The production of local livelihood systems such as agriculture, fisheries, livestock, and forest enhanced under climate change

Outcome 3 - Enhanced capacity of local institutions and of communities to better adapt to climate change