Under Implementation

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GCF Readiness Programme

The Green Climate Fund Readiness Programme builds countries' capacity to access the Green Climate Fund, through preparing countries to plan for, manage, disburse and monitor climate financing. By offering results-oriented support, the Programme helps strengthen national climate finance institutional frameworks, assist in identifying climate change activities with high funding priority for the countries, and facilitate increased investment of the private sector in climate relevant areas.

Learn more at www.gcfreadinessprogramme.org.

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UNDP
Claudia Ortiz
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National Adaptation Plans in Liberia

The GCF-funded project "To advance the National Adaptation Plans (NAP) process for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors (i.e. agriculture, energy, waste management, forestry and health) and coastal areas in Liberia" will work to strengthen institutional frameworks and coordination for the implementation of the NAP process, expand the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation, build capacity for mainstreaming climate change adaptation into planning, and budgeting processes and systems, and formulate financing mechanisms for scaling-up adaptation, including public, private, national and international.

National partners will include the Environment Planning Authority and the National Climate Change Secretariat. Other key partners are the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, Ministry of Agriculture, National Disaster Management Commission, National Port Authority of Liberia, Liberia Maritime Authority, Bureau of National Fisheries, Liberia National Department of Meteorology, Liberia Institute of Statistics and Geo-Information Services and University of Liberia.

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POINT (-10.055053775392 6.4330353190148)
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US$2.3 million
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Liberia, like other developing countries, especially Least Developed Countries (LDCs), is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. While Liberia has a low carbon footprint, the impact and effects of climate change may have severe consequences in multiple sectors and areas.  Changes in temperature and precipitation may affect several sectors and areas across Liberia, including agriculture, fisheries, forests, energy production related to the availability of water resources, coastal areas and health.

At the sectoral level, 70% of the population depends on agriculture for their livelihoods, while rural areas are as much as 80% vulnerable to food insecurity, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. In the 350 miles of coastal areas, these are exposed to the combined effects of ongoing coastal erosion, climate change induced sea level rise, change in the frequency and intensity of storms, and increases in precipitation and warmer ocean temperatures. For health, climate change may lead to increased vulnerability to malaria, cholera and diarrheal diseases, as well as increased incidence of other diseases. Finally, climate change may negatively impact hydroelectric generation from the Mount Coffee hydropower plant.

Liberia began its National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process in 2015 with the development of a Road Map in consultation with the main stakeholders in the country. This road map was based on an evaluation of the existing climate adaptation and mitigation initiatives, an assessment of the knowledge, capacity and implementation gaps, as well as an assessment of the capacity development needs. The road map provides a guideline for implementation of the NAP process in Liberia, and the areas to work in the short, medium and long term.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Strengthening of Institutional Frameworks and coordination for the NAPs process

1.1. Development of a climate change strategy and action plan for adaptation, in support of the on-going development of the Climate Change Policy

Prior to the NAP, the GoL has implemented a number of climate change related initiatives; including the NAPA in 2008, Initial National Communication in 2012, National Climate Change Policy and REDD+ in 2012. The lack of institutional and technical capacity on climate change adaptation in Liberia prevents the GoL and the stakeholders to integrate fully ACC into planning and budgeting processes, and to implement successfully adaptation strategies.

1.2. Development of sector-based climate change strategies and actions plans in agriculture and coastal management

The coastal development and management and agriculture have been identified as priority sectors for NAP in Liberia. The present project will focus primarily on these sectors. In order to integrate the CCA in sectoral policy, it is important to evaluate all current adaptation options and integrate adaptation into all sectoral policies. Updated and relevant climate vulnerability and risk assessment, studies on the economic impacts of climate change as it relates to the key sectors and most important resources give decisions makers and the most vulnerable population adequate tools/information to integrate climate change into their planning strategies. Also, it enables them to better plan their medium and long-term adaptation programs/policies/strategies.

Output 2: Expansion of the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation

At the moment, there is limited scientific data (resources, socio-economic indicators, meteorological, etc.) and information on climate impacts in Liberia, with limited knowledge of current climate variability, climate risks and no early warning system data. There is a need to develop and disseminate socio-economic scenarios to project the future impacts of climate change in Liberia and develop vulnerability studies at the sector and national level. Related to climate services, there is limited capacity to monitor, forecast, archive, analyse and communicate hydro-meteorological and climate change information. The modelling capacity, infrastructures and human capacity of the meteorological department and other climate services need to be reinforced in order to identify climate change hazards and to explore/ evaluate suitable adaptation options in the vulnerable sectors.

2.1. Effective Climate data and related information knowledge sharing platform created

Actual and past climate data collection and analysis are essential to the NAP process. Furthermore, with climate change cutting across multiple sectors, it’s necessary for Liberia to implement a platform to make accessible climate data and related information across all sectors, and to engage all stakeholders in the process (producers and beneficiaries). Related to climate services, there is limited capacity to monitor, forecast, archive, analyze and communicate hydro-meteorological and climate change information.

2.2. Natural disasters risk management and reduction strategies developed

Climate related hazards (floods, windstorms, fire, and sea erosion) are likely to worsen with climate change in Liberia. This in turn will have significant impact on local communities livelihood, the key sectors and overall national economic performances. One possible entry point for NAP is the integration of natural disasters risk management and reduction strategies for in Liberia public financing.

Output 3: Development of guidelines and criteria for mainstreaming climate change adaptation in Government budgeting and planning, climate-proofing projects, and reporting

3.1. Development of technical guidelines for the personnel of Ministry of Finance & Development Planning (MFDP) and other relevant Ministries to include climate change into budgeting and planning.

The NAP process as a transversal process integrates multiple sectors. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into policy and budgeting processing (at the sectoral, national and subnational) implies identifying and evaluating all current and on-going CCA options and developing guidelines for the personnel of key Ministries to include climate change into all planning and budgeting processes.

3.2. Capacity building for the private sector, financial intermediaries and other stakeholders in the implementation of adaptation activities.

In addition to strong institutions and coordination mechanisms, adequate level of technical knowledge on climate change and ACC of staff of sectoral ministries, private sector, financial intermediaries and other stakeholders are needed to implement and prioritize adaptation options.

3.3. Development of tools (screening tools, scorecards) for climate proofing of investments in infrastructure and other areas that may be sensitive to the impacts of climate change, to be able to withstand those impacts.

Climate-proofing a project is to reduce the climate change potential impact on the project activities. The final goal is to increase resilience to climate change, protect investments and increase the project sustainability. Generally, it involves assessing the risks posed by climate change and modifying the project design to reduce those risks. In order to climate proof investments in infrastructure and other areas that may be sensitive to the impacts of climate change, it is important to develop and apply tools (such as, the Climate Proofing for Development, designed by GIZ) enabling the inclusion climate aspect into planning and designing of project at national, sectoral, and local levels.

3.4. Implement reporting system to track investments and other climate related finance in adaptation.

The NAP process being an ongoing process with iterative steps, it is essential to periodically monitor and evaluate the progress made. The guidelines of the LEG on the NAP insist on the importance of the M&E process (Axis D). Moreover, M&E is useful for reporting to the international and bilateral donors and as well as to the UNFCCC.

Output 4: Formulation of financial mechanisms for scaling up adaptation In Liberia, like many other developing countries, a significant handicap is the non-appropriation of processes at all levels and the lack of local funds to sustain previous investments.

4.1. Designing of procedures to scale up adaptation investments and address financial gaps.

The GCF resources will allow the GoL to identify and provide adequate alternative funding to support adaptations strategies implementation. Additionally, inclusion of climate change into the planning and national budget process at an early stage will secure co-financing of internationally funded projects by the GoL.

4.2. Fostering Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) to support adaptation investments

Public private partnerships (PPP) in identifying and managing climate variability and to manage climate change, is essential planning climate change adaptation actions. The private sector companies, for their own economic interest, collect and analyse climate data. To be cost effective, it is necessary to learn and capitalize the private sector’s experience in identifying climate variability and managing climate change. The importance of the private sector in supporting Liberia’s CCA actions is well established in its Initial National Communication (2013) and INDC (2015). With Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC), the private sector (petroleum and industrial companies) is a major producer of GHGs in Liberia (the energy and agricultural sector GHGs production amount to 67.5% and 31.9% of the national total, respectively). The role of the private sector in CCA in Liberia can be summarized in the following: (i) identification and implementation of strategies to reduce GHGs emissions, (ii) provision and sales of climate-sensible technologies and services, and (iii) funding of CCA projects.

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Liberia receives first instalment of US$2.2 million GCF grant for climate adaptation
10 July, 2015, Green Climate Fund
The Government of Liberia has recently received US$805,000 as part of a US$2.2 million Green Climate Fund grant to support its national climate adaptation planning process. The release of funds to the West African country represents GCF’s first transfer of adaptation resources to a least developed country (LDC). Supported through the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GCF-funded project "to advance the National Adaptation Plans (NAP) process for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors (i.e. agriculture, energy, waste management, forestry and health) and coastal areas in Liberia" will work to strengthen institutional frameworks and coordination for the implementation of the NAP process, expand the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation, build capacity for mainstreaming climate change adaptation into planning, and budgeting processes and systems, and formulate financing mechanisms for scaling-up adaptation, including public, private, national and international.

GCF approves first grants for National Adaptation Planning in Liberia and Nepal
15 November 2016, Green Climate Fund
The Green Climate Fund (GCF) today announced the approval of its first grants in support of processes to develop National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). Under the GCF's Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme, Liberia will receive USD 2.2 million with UNDP acting as its delivery partner to implement its NAPs activities, whilst Nepal will receive a grant of USD 2.9 million via UNEP.

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To advance the National Adaptation Plans (NAP) process for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors (i.e. agriculture, energy, waste management, forestry and health) and coastal areas in Liberia

Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1 - Strengthen institutional frameworks and coordination for the implementation of the NAP process

Output 2 - Expand the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation

Output 3 - Build capacity for mainstreaming climate change adaptation into planning, and budgeting processes and systems

Output 4 - Formulate financing mechanisms for scaling-up adaptation, including public, private, national and international.

Supporting developing countries to integrate the agricultural sectors into National Adaptation Plans: The Gambia

The agriculture sectors in the Gambia heavily feature subsistence farming, mostly of cereals, and the farming of cash crops, such as groundnuts and cotton. Crop production employs roughly 70 percent of the population and generates 33 percent of GDP. The country is highly susceptible to sea-level rise, which could cause major damage to the country’s important coastal economic development assets. The Gambia has been working to formulate a comprehensive transformational adaptation plan. The country’s long-term adaptation priorities are being included in a NAP while short to medium-term priorities are being added to the Low Emissions Climate Resilient Development Strategy (LECRDS) and National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP). In addition, climate change adaptation priorities will be mainstreamed into national agriculture and livestock policies, plans and programmes.

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Supporting developing countries to integrate the agricultural sectors into National Adaptation Plans: Guatemala

Guatemala is vulnerable to frequent natural disasters. It’s not just the country’s geographical location that leaves it susceptible. Poor housing, high malnutrition and unemployment also compound the situation to make the country’s inhabitants more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with indigenous communities and farmers being among the most affected. In an effort to increase resilience, Guatemala developed a National Climate Change Action Plan (Plan de Acción Nacional de Cambio Climático, PANCC) that incorporates mitigation and adaptation priority actions. Some the activities that the country is looking to implement include: increase the production of grains, strengthen early warning systems for food and nutrition insecurity, and provide technical assistance to farmers on phytosanitary and zoosanitary measures.

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Supporting developing countries to integrate the agricultural sectors into National Adaptation Plans: Colombia

Colombia launched its National Adaptation Plan (Plan Nacional de Adaptación al Cambio Climático, PNACC) in 2012. This milestone document was followed in 2013 by a Road Map for the country’s National Adaptation Plan (Hoja de ruta para la elaboración de los planes de adaptación dentro del PNACC). The specifics of the country’s adaptation actions are being elaborated in additional territorial and sectorial adaptation plans – one of which is a plan for the agriculture sectors. Colombia is also developing a set of adaptation indicators to monitor and evaluate impacts in selected territories. These will be incorporated into a national monitoring system and protocol.

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GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POINT (14.062499990295 29.697596503683), POINT (38.671874985886 25.334096687047))
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MinAgricultura oficializa programa para preparar al campo frente al cambio climático en Colombia

El Ministerio de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural, en alianza con la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura (FAO) y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), formalizaron el Programa de Integración de la Agricultura en los Planes Nacionales de Adaptación. El objetivo de este programa es que al término del próximo año el país cuente con una herramienta que le permita adelantar acciones de adaptación al cambio climático, tal y como confirmó el Ministro de Agricultura, Aurelio Iragorri. "El cambio climático es una realidad que todavía muchos no están dispuestos a asumir, pero desde que trazamos los lineamientos de la política Colombia Siembra, fue una obligación vincular la actividad agropecuaria con la protección del medio ambiente y la adaptación ante los efectos, en veces devastadores, de fenómenos climáticos que determinan la productividad rural", indicó Iragorri.

Related Publications and Documents

 

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Programme for the Support of the National Adaptation Strategy to Climate Change in Mali

Like other countries in the Sahel, Mali is susceptible to climate variability and is suffering from the impacts of global climate change. According to forecasts, rainfall will fluctuate even more in the future and the frequency of extreme events such as drought or heavy rain will increase. The poorest groups are harder hit by the impacts of climate change because they depend directly on natural resources for their livelihoods.

The "Programme for the Support of the National Adaptation Strategy to Climate Change in Mali" Project will work to strengthen Mali's National Adaptation Strategy, and works in conjunction with other UNDP-supported projects in Mali, including the Supporting Mali to Advance their NAP Process Project. 

The main objective of the project is to ensure that ecosystems, social systems and production chains in vulnerable regions of Mali are more resilient to the impacts of climate change thanks to innovative, integrated approaches to climate change adaptation.

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Coordinates: 
POINT (-1.3183593819504 17.855904418065)
Financing Amount: 
US$5.4 million (BMUB funding)
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Mali ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and presented its National Adaptation Programme of Action in 2007. The country has had a national climate policy, a climate strategy and an action plan for implementation since July 2011. At the donor conference held in May 2013 in response to the crisis in Mali, a plan was adopted for the country’s economic reconstruction. Core themes in this plan include the environment, private sector development and agriculture.

In January 2012, the Malian Government created a national climate fund designed to mobilise national and international financing from public and private sources. The government plans to use these funds to increase the population's resilience to the impacts of climate change. The Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) has pledged EUR 4 million to the fund and the Norwegian Government plans to contribute EUR 1.8 million. The Malian Ministry of Environment has asked GIZ to serve on the fund's steering committee as one of five donors.

The project team is working with the Malian partners to integrate climate-related issues into policies and existing planning, strategy development and monitoring instruments. The different levels of decentralisation – central government, regions and municipalities – are taken into account, which ensures that this approach is firmly established throughout the country and that resilience is being increased. Existing processes are being overhauled to take account of adaptation and mitigation potential and, where necessary, new, integrated instruments are being created to promote climate-resistant development.

Municipalities that have successfully integrated climate aspects into their planning instruments are working with the project team to identify and implement activities designed to help them and their residents deal more effectively with the consequences of climate change. This capability is extremely important, particularly when it comes to securing families’ livelihoods. The project team has given women a strong role in this process. Through direct cooperation with the municipalities, both municipal employees and the poor can benefit directly from the measures and pass on the lessons learned to other communities.

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is responsible for three other areas of activity. The network of weather stations is being expanded and capabilities for analysing and using weather data developed. In addition, UNDP supports operationalisation of the climate fund so that it can be incorporated into Mali’s structures. In close consultation with the GIZ project team, UNDP also promotes adaptation measures in selected municipalities.

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Main Objective - Ensure that ecosystems, social systems and production chains in vulnerable regions of Mali are more resilient to the impacts of climate change thanks to innovative, integrated approaches to climate change adaptation.

Project Dates: 
2014 to 2019

Enhancing Climate Resilience of the Vulnerable Communities and Ecosystems in Somalia

With financing from the Global Environment Facility’s (GEF) Least Developed Country Countries Fund, the Federal Government of Somalia, in partnership with UNDP, is working to bolster the resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems to climate change. The project is working in semi-autonomous states in Somalia: South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland, which unilaterally declared itself an independent republic in 1991. The project is working to respond to the adverse impacts of climate change and improve the adaptive capacity of vulnerable farmers in pilot areas, and the ecosystems on which they depend.

Building resilience to climatic events is critical for Somalia as the country stabilizes after decades of conflict and commits long-term development for its people.

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Coordinates: 
POINT (45.70312499461 4.0505767912589)
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Communities in the selected areas in South West State, Galmudug State, Puntland, and Somaliland - especially small-scale farmers
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News Highlight: XILI ROOBAB AY KA DA EEN DEEGANADA PUNTLAND AYAA RER MIYIGU SHEEGEN IN BIYO XIREENADII LA SAMEEYAY A

Sand dams save lives - Fatima's story

Sand dams save lives- Mohamed Ismail's story

UNDP Somalia Climate Resilience Project - Documentary Film

UNDP under its Enhancing Climate Change Resilience (CCR) project of the Poverty Reduction and Environment Protection Programme (PREP), in partnership with the Somali Government, have initiated innovative project activities aimed at enhancing the climate resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems. The project also seeks to address some of the underlying drivers of conflict by empowering both the concerned National and Civil Society institutions, as well as the women, men and children from the most vulnerable communities.

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8,000,000 USD
Co-Financing Total: 
64,820,000 USD
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Green shoots of peace and development are emerging in Somalia, after a particularly difficult period of instability. UNDP is at the forefront to help the people of Somalia to recover from years of conflict, while setting the country on the path to sustainable development. In recent years, Somalia has experienced changes in weather and climate that are affecting the country’s economic and social development. Facing increasing uncertainty for seasonal and annual rainfall levels, rising surface temperatures, sea level rise, and the loss of lives and livelihoods dependent on fragile or over-exploited ecosystems and natural resources, there is concern that future climate changes could exacerbate displacement in the region and intensify conflict over scarce natural resources, including water.

Approximately 70% of Somalis are dependent on climate-sensitive agriculture and pastoralism. As floods and droughts become more severe and frequent in Somalia, there is a need to find approaches that can reduce the sensitivity of farmers and pastoralists to increasing rainfall variability. To address these issues, LDCF financing will be used to support ministries, districts, NGOs/CBOs to integrate climate change risks in Natural Resource Management and disaster preparedness. Climate risk management will be institutionalized from national to local levels. CBOs will be revitalized to take the lead on implementing community-based Ecosystem-based flood preparedness and other adaptation measures.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Component 1: Enhancing Policies, Institutional Frameworks and Government Capacities

1.1 Policies, plans and tools reviewed, revised, developed, adopted and implemented by government to mainstream and enhance adaptive capacity and mitigate the risks of climate change on vulnerable communities and critical ecosystem services

Component 2: Piloting Ecosystem Based Adaptation strategies

2.1 Models of community and ecosystem resilience developed and implemented in pilot areas selected in consultation with government and community stakeholders.

Project Dates: 
2014 to 2019

CCA Growth: Implementing Climate Resilient and Green Economy Plans in Highland Areas in Ethiopia

The "CCA Growth: Implementing Climate Resilient and Green Economy Plans in Highland Areas in Ethiopia" project will work to mainstream climate risks into national and sub-national planning processes thereby increasing the resilience of local communities across the Ethiopian highlands to climate change.

Today in Ethiopia, climate change considerations are not reflected in development planning and decision making at national and local levels. The expected changes in climate and its impact on livelihoods are severe, especially in the highlands of Ethiopia. If climate change is not addressed, it is more than likely that expected development gains will not be realized. Recurrent drought is another persistent risk in Ethiopia, and continued stresses from severe weather events and changing rainfall patterns raise the spectre of hunger, malnutrition and diminishing returns on investments in poverty reduction. Furthermore, the impacts of weather variability and climate change will not be uniform across the country: some regions are more vulnerable than others. Vulnerability will depend on livelihood type and exposure to risk, both of which are highly variable even within small/local regions.

Changes in the weather patterns marked by greater variability are imposing additional risks to human development in Ethiopia. These risks are most heavily borne by farmers engaging in subsistence or rain-fed agriculture, both for landless households whose income largely derives from on-farm wage labour, and women-headed households because of their baseline vulnerability to external shocks. With funding from the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund, this project will strengthen the adaptive capacity and resilience of these targeted groups from the impacts of climatic variability and change.

The project will also put 17,800 hectares of agricultural, rangeland and forest landscapes under sustainable land management systems, including 800 hectares of new exclosure sites, maintenance of 8000 hectares of existing exclosures and planting of indigenous and multi-use plant species for over 8800 hectares of degraded land.

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POINT (37.265624991326 8.5918844125631)
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US$6.2 million GEF-LDCF
Co-Financing Total: 
US$10.4 million (US$10.3 million Government of Ethiopia, US$150,000 UNDP)
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The key underlying causes of vulnerability are multiple. Land is highly degraded due to deforestation for wood fuel and charcoal production as well as timber for construction, unsustainable farming practices, cultivation of fragile and marginal land and overgrazing, combined with rapidly increasing human and livestock populations.

Such environmental degradation has resulted in changes to the water cycle, poor soil quality, and in highland areas a barren land that is devoid of vegetation cover, which is exposed to soil and wind erosion, thereby creating a self-reinforcing cycle of reduced land fertility, reduced water resources, and lower crop and livestock production and productivity.

Other human-caused stresses such as eutrophication, acid precipitation, toxic chemicals and the spread of exotic/invasive plant species in the rift valley lakes further reinforce this cycle. The long-term preferred solution is to build sustainable and climate-resilient economic growth among vulnerable communities, targeting eight highland areas in Ethiopia.

This will involve taking the essential elements of the participatory and capacity development approach of the MERET (Managing Environmental Resources to Enable Transitions) programme, but addressing identified weaknesses by adding strong elements of requirements for climate change adaptation (e.g. alternative livelihoods, crop diversification, resilient agricultural practices, better water management and irrigation), capacity development of Woreda and regional government (technical training and mentoring for participatory vulnerability assessments, environmental impact assessments, cost-benefit analysis of climate-smart investments, no regrets interventions, integrating climate change risks and opportunities in development planning and budgeting).

Additionally this involves addressing participatory monitoring, impact assessment and action learning in order to assess what makes for successful adaptation and growth strategies in highland areas across different climate and agro-ecological zones, cultural traditions and agricultural practices, as well as strengthening of learning pathways to national policy processes.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Capacities enhanced for climate-resilient planning among communities, local government and central government

Output 1.1: Assessment of the capacity and resource needs of MoANR, MoLF, MoFEC, MEFCC, MoWIE and NMA at federal, regional and Woreda-level to build climate resilience.

Output 1.2: Capacity development of staff from MoANR, MoLF, MoFEC, MEFCC, NMA and MoWIE at federal, regional and Woreda-level on climate change and climate-resilient planning.

Output 1.3: Training of extension agents and local communities to integrate climate change into planning processes.

Output 1.4: Annual knowledge-sharing forum of regional and Woreda-level sectoral experts, extension agents and community representatives.

Output 1.5: Public awareness-raising campaign and training programme for local communities – including for women and youths – on the implementation of climate-resilient adaptation interventions and diversified livelihoods

Outcome 2 - Use of climate information for risk management strengthened for smallholder farmers, with a focus on women and youth

Output 2.1: A functional climate information and early warning system to monitor weather conditions.

Output 2.2: Community-based climate forecast and decision-making support tool.

Output 2.3: Capacity development of extension agents, CBOs (women’s groups, school clubs and youth groups) as well as farmers on climate information and monitoring systems.

Outcome 3 - Adapted and flexible income and employment opportunities generated for poor people, with a focus on climate-smart agriculture and integrated watershed management

Output 3.1: Vulnerability assessments and integrated watershed management and landscape management plans.

Output 3.2: Integrated watershed management across the eight target Woredas.

Output 3.3: Diversified livelihoods, including animal fattening, value-addition to agricultural products and off-farm opportunities.

Output 3.4: Strategy for monitoring, evaluating and upscaling activities, including potential for local investment by microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Contacts: 
Benjamin Larroquette
Regional Technical Advisor
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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Capacities enhanced for climate-resilient planning among communities, local government and central government

Outcome 2 - Use of climate information for risk management strengthened for smallholder farmers, with a focus on women and youth

Outcome 3 - Adapted and flexible income and employment opportunities generated for poor people, with a focus on climate-smart agriculture and integrated watershed management

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2022

Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods

The main objective of the "Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods" programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

The programme targets the three regions in the northern part of Ghana: the Upper East, Upper West and Northern Regions. Compared to other regions of the country, these three northern regions have high degree of exposure to climate variability and change characterized by increasing temperatures and decreasing and erratic rainfall. These factors make the northern regions highly vulnerable to climate change and high priority regions for climate change adaptation.

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A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprises the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010.
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US$8.2 million (according to Adaptation Fund Website)
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Water is recognized as a cross-cutting resource underlying the National Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy of the Republic of Ghana and the National Water Policy with direct linkages to the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The lack of potable water caused by extreme climate events such as droughts and floods, increases the exposure of people, especially women and children, to water-borne and other hygiene-related diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera. Besides household wellbeing, water plays a central role in many industrial activities. For example, hydropower generation, transportation services, tourism and the agricultural, livestock and fisheries sectors all depend on water resources. Rainwater harvesting serves as the major source of surface water for many rural communities during the rainy season. There is high agreement between national and regional analyses that vulnerability, especially to droughts, has geographical patterns and socioeconomic associations.

The country experienced severe drought in 1983. Since the late 1990s, floods have been increasingly frequent in the northern regions. Floods affected more than 300,000 people in 1999, 630,000 in 2007/08 and 140,000 in 2010, causing deaths, damaging farmlands, and destroying livelihoods. This resulted in severe hunger, which affected the poor and reduced gross domestic product for that year.

The most severe flood occurred in 2007, during which 630,000 people were affected, through losses of life and displacement, and extensive infrastructural damage and loss of crops. This phenomenon demonstrates the potential impact of climate change on Ghana’s development.

Under a changing climate, poor farmers are finding it difficult to predict the timing of rainy seasons. Consequently, it is becoming difficult manage climate risks to crop production. Failure in crop production is one of the key factors undermining food security . The World Food Programme’s (WFP) Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (2009) found that 5% of the population or 1.2 million people are food insecure.

The bulk of the food insecure population is located in the northern regions: 34% in Upper West, 15% in Upper East, and 10% in Northern region. This is the equivalent of approximately 453,000 people. The three northern regions covered by this programme are the most vulnerable. Similarly, the adaptive capacity of these three regions is the lowest nationwide due to low socioeconomic development and the heavy dependence of local economies and livelihoods on rain-fed systems such as agriculture and forestry.

Decreasing annual rainfall and its increasingly erratic pattern, on the background of climate change, are adversely affecting rural livelihoods in northern Ghana and in particular agricultural and pastoral practices. Agriculture is a major driver of Ghana’s economy and employs close to 55 percent of the total labour force.

The proposed Programme will promote four types of adaptation intervention: 1. livelihood enhancement; 2. livelihood diversification; 3. ecosystem protection and enhancement; and 4. community-level water infrastructure planning. These approaches will build up financial, natural, physical and social capital of the communities. A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprise the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010. The main indicator of vulnerability reduction will be changes in access to water and diversification of livelihood activities. Income generation will increase by 30 % in at least 50% of households in the communities.

The main adaptation benefits of the Programme are that it will be able to provide concrete inputs into water resource management planning in the northern region by ensuring that climate change concerns are taken into account. The Programme will be able to build and enhance the adaptive capacity of the ecological systems of water catchments to climate change, once the proposed measures are adopted and implemented.

This is expected to be the first showcase in the Ghana where climate concerns are taken into account and lessons learned will be replicated to other river basins of the country. The activities that will be implemented will include producing knowledge products that capture lessons learnt on management of water resources and diversification of livelihoods under climate change. The capacity to document traditional knowledge systems as well as methods for managing knowledge will be developed, as well as the engagement of community service organizations for knowledge transfer.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The main objective of the programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

There are three components, each with the following outcomes that will be delivered by the programme:

COMPONENT 1: WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING

Outcome 1: Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

COMPONENT 2: COMMUNITY LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

Outcome 2: Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

COMPONENT 3: DIVERSIFICATION OF LIVELIHOODS OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Outcome 3: Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Northern Regions urged to embrace climate Adaptation Fund Project
Vibe Ghana

Friday 17 February 2017

The Chiefs and people of the Northern, Upper East and Upper West Regions have been urged to embrace the Adaptation Fund Project to help increase climate resilience and enhance sustainable land and water management in the areas. The Adaptation Fund was established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2001 to finance concrete adaptation projects and programmes in developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. The Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MEST) with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is implementing the project in some selected communities in the north. Mr Asher Nkegbe, the Upper East Regional Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), made the call when the technical team of the Project undertook separates community visits to the beneficiary communities in the Upper East Region to engage them on the project implementation and to solicit for their support in the process.

 

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 -  Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

Outcome 2 - Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

Outcome 3 - Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Project Dates: 
2015 to 2019

Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change

Climate-induced pressures are negatively impacting impacting the energy sector in Benin. As average temperatures rise, electricity demand is increasing - with more intensive and longer use of air conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration needed during the year. Coupled with inefficient household and commercial equipment (fridges, TV, AC, fans) and non-efficient lighting of buildings, there are critical imbalances in the energy sector. 

With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources and enhance the efficiency of energy supply and demand, this project, Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change, will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for a better planning and management of the energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector

 

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (2.4073791427729 10.170619887336)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
8,000,000 USD (GEF Project Grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
31,570,000 USD
Project Details: 
The project will contribute in overcoming the political, institutional, financial barriers and those relating to individual capacities and to knowledge impeding to prevent and reduce the impacts in vulnerable communities of climate-related risks on the energy sector of Benin. This will involve the development of a strategy for strengthening resilience of the key energy sources, the integration of climate risks in the planning and budgeting processes of the energy sector and the promotion of behavioural change on the part of both consumers and producers of energy.
 
Both resilient energy use and the development of alternative energy sources (portfolio approach) will be necessary to reduce vulnerability. Given the importance of biomass in the context of Benin’s current energy supply, these measures will also need to be backed up by the practice of sustainable land management options especially in areas that are more vulnerable and the promotion of income-generating activities, alternatives to non-sustainable forest and land uses practices in riparian communities of wood energy supplying landscapes, and the adoption and implementation by Benin, of institutional, political and regulatory measures aiming at removing any obstacles to such adoption of adaptation measures.
 
The project will, therefore, support the achievement of the following key results: (a) Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools (Outcome 1), (b) introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas (Outcome 2), and (c) promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy (Outcome 3).
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project will support the achievement of the following key results: Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools, introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas, and promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy.

Component 1 : Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools
Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures

Component 2: Sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of the zones supplying wood for energy
Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts

Component 3: Technology transfers to strengthen the resilience of livelihoods and living conditions of the vulnerable communities
Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Rene Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Saliou Toure
Technical Specialist, RSCSA
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Minister Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin). 

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About (Summary): 
With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources, and enhancing the efficiency of energy supply and demand, the Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change project will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for better planning and management of energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Ministry of Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin).
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures.

Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts.

Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector.

Project Dates: 
2016 to 2021