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Technology Transfer for Climate Resilient Flood Management in Bosnia and Herzegovina's Vrbas River Basin​

BiH is significantly exposed to the threats of climate change, but has very limited capacity to address and adapt to its negative impacts, in particular the frequency and magnitude of floods from its major rivers which have tripled in frequency in the last decade. The negative impacts of climate change particularly affect the vulnerable groups within the basin and key sectors such as agriculture and energy (hydropower). Vrbas River basin is characterized by a large rural population comprised of the poorest and most vulnerable communities in BiH, including war returnees and displaced people, with high exposure to flooding and its devastating impacts. In May 2014, Bosnia and Herzegovina experienced its worst flooding in 150 years which resulted in 23 deaths and 2.7 Billion USD worth of damages which is 15% of GDP, and is expected to result in a 1.1% contraction in the economy this year, compared to the growth of 2.2% that had been predicted before the flood.

The project, “Technology transfer for climate resilient flood management in Vrbas River Basin”, will enable the government of BiH and communities of the Vrbas basin to adapt to flood risk through the transfer of adaptation technologies for climate resilient flood management and embark on climate resilient economic activities.

Working closely with state, entity and local governments and institutions the project will enable strategic management of flood risk through the legislative and policy framework and appropriate sectoral policies and plans that incorporate climate change considerations. In order to develop institutional and local capacities in Flood Risk Management (FRM) the project aims to:

  • Upgrade and rehabilitate of the hydrometric monitoring network,
  • Develop Flood Risk Management plan (FRM) for Vrbas river basin (VRB),
  • Develop flood risks and flood hazard maps for the VRB,
  • Develop a flood forecasting system and early warning system,
  • Develop emergency response plans, and provide trainings in flood-specific civil protection,
  • Provide targeted training on climate-induced FRM to over 100 practitioners and decisions makers,
  • Prepare institutional capacity development plan for the long-term development of capability and capacity in Flood Risk Management (FRM),
  • Implement non-structural interventions in municipalities of the VRB,
  • Provide training to local communities in climate resilient FRM, and introduce community-based early warning systems,
  • Prepare and implement municipal-level flood response and preparedness plans,
  • Implement agro-forestation scheme,
  • Introduce financial instruments such as index-based flood insurance and credit deference schemes as a means of compensating for flood damages for agriculture. 

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014) and Establishment of hydro-meteorological network in Vrbas River Basin (November 2015).

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (17.413330041505 44.592423131342)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the Vrbas River Basin
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
5,000,000 (Grant Amount detailed in the CEO Endorsement, 21 January 2015.)

Together in the struggle with the climate change - UNDP BiH

The workshop on reducing the risk of floods and the impact of climate change was held in Banja Luka, April 2015, and it aimed to gather all relevant representatives of local authorities and institutions and international organizations in order to get familiar with all the activities that take place and effectively coordinate them. The ongoing projects and planned activities were presented in the field of flood protection and water management in BiH and all participants expressed their willingness to reduce the risk of flooding and other negative impacts of climate change.

Co-Financing Total: 
77,260,000 (As detailed in the CEO Endorsement, 21 January 2015.)
Project Details: 

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) is a middle income country with an estimated 3.8 million inhabitants, which is still recovering from the 1992-1995 war which had a devastating impact on its human, social and economic resources, leading to enormous challenges of the post-war reconstruction and economic and social recovery. This challenge has been further compounded by the transition towards market economy requiring structural reforms and improved governance. The slow rate of the post-war economic recovery of Bosnia and Herzegovina has been compounded by the negative impacts of climate change on key sectors such as agriculture, energy (hydropower), the environment and, in particular, the frequency and magnitude of flood disasters, which have tripled in frequency in the last decade.  In May 2014, Bosnia and Herzegovina experienced its worst flooding in 150 years which resulted in 23 deaths and $2.7 Billion USD worth of damages which is 15% of GDP, and is expected to result in a 1.1 percent contraction in the economy this year, compared to the growth of 2.2 percent that had been predicted before the flood.

BiH is significantly exposed to the threats of climate change, but has very limited capacity to address and adapt to its negative impacts, in particular the frequency and magnitude of floods from its major rivers. The Vrbas River basin is characterized by a large rural population comprised of the poorest and most vulnerable communities in BiH, including war returnees and displaced people, with high exposure to flooding and its devastating impacts. Of the 28 munipalities that make up the Vrbas basin, 13 have experienced flooding in the past decade. Around a third of the rural population of Vrbas Basin (approximately 100,300 people) manage "smallholdings" where they produce fruit, vegetables and livestock products mainly for their own consumption, and about 16% may be classified as "farmers", in that they manage at least 3 ha and/or 3 livestock units. Agriculture is therefore important to the Vrbas River Basin, and the direct impacts of climate change on agriculture such as floods and droughts will inevitably impact the rural communities without any adaptation. Under climate change there is a real risk of reduced crop yields leading to increased food prices, which would in turn have negative implications for food security. 

The SCCF funds will be used to enable the communities of the Vrbas basin to adapt to flood risk through the transfer of adaptation technologies for climate resilient flood management, upgrade and rehabilitation of the hydrometric monitoring network, development of a flood forecasting system and early warning system, development of emergency response plans, and provision of training in flood-specific civil protection.   Importantly, the project will provide targeted training on climate-induced FRM to over 100 practitioners and decisions makers, and will develop an institutional capacity development plan for the long-term development of capability and capacity in Flood Risk Management (FRM).  The project will work closely with affected communities to introduce climate resilient community-based non-structural measures and provide training to local communities in climate resilient FRM. This will include the introduction of agro-forestry, community-based early warning systems, reforestation and introduction of financial instruments such as index-based flood insurance and credit deference schemes as a means of compensating for flood damages for agriculture. 

The enabling environment will be enhanced by embedding climate change into key sector policies, strategies and plans to enable climate resilient flood risk management within sectors that impact flood risk significantly, including land use and spatial planning, forestry, agriculture and energy sectors.  Specifically, the project will introduce floodplain management regulations that will enhance zoning of development and activities away from high risk areas. 

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1. Key relevant development strategies/policies/legislation integrate climate change-resilient flood management approaches

Update at least two priority sectoral policies and plans (e.g. agriculture, hydropower, water resources) to include climate change modeling results (Output 1.1); Update floodplain management and spatial planning regulations and policies to include climate change risks (revision of land use regulations, stricter policy on construction permits in the areas prone to flooding, etc) (Output 1.2); also to codify and disseminate appropriate adaptation technology solutions for climate resilient flood management in BiH (Output 1.3).

Outcome 2. Climate resilient flood risk management is enabled by transferring modern technologies and strengthening institutional capacities

Improved hydrological and hydrodynamic model for the VRB incorporating climate change predictions, developed to produce flood hazard inundation maps for spatial planning and emergency response planning, and for the long-term strategic flood risk management of the VRB (Output 2.1)establishe and institutionalize GIS-based vulnerability, loss and damages assessment tool and database to record, analyze, predict and assess hydro-meteorological and other hazard events and associated losses (Output 2.2)upgrade the hydro-meteorological monitoring system in the VRB (increased from 11 to 25 gauging stations) and harmonize into a central hydrometric system (Output 2.3); Develop institutional capacity strengthening plan and provide targeted training on climate-induced flood risk management to at least 100 practitioners and decision-makers (Output 2.4)

Outcome 3. New technologies and approaches for enhanced flood risk management applied to increase resilience of vulnerable communities in VRB.

Developed integrated land use and flood risk management plan for the VRB and implement non-structural measures by local communities (through Output 3.2.), government and/or private sector (Output 3.1)Implement articipatory community-based adaptation strategies, technologies and practices in priority flood risk areas (e.g. community afforestation scheme on the flood plains as well as establish locally controlled and managed flood zones and watershed rehabilitation works, etc. (Output 3.2); Train local communities (particularly women and refugees) to implement and maintain flood resilient non-structural intervention measures, including agricultural practices such as agro-forestry, to improve livelihoods of 13communities in the VRB, and community-based flood early warning systems (Output 3.3)Modify early warning system in VRB to include the new hydrometric monitoring network as part of a fully-integrated flood forecasting system (comprised of centrally-based and community-based early warning systems) while also preparing and implementing municipal-level flood response and preparedness plans (Output 3.4)

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The project will be monitored through the following M& E activities, which include Inception Workshop and Report; Measurement of Means of Verification of project results; Measurement of Means of Verification for Project Progress on output and implementation; ARR/PIR; Periodic status/ progress reports; Mid-term Evaluation; Final Evaluation; Project Terminal Report; Audit; and Visits to field sites.

A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

The Inception Workshop should address a number of key issues including:

a)     Assist all partners to fully understand and take ownership of the project.  Detail the roles, support services and complementary responsibilities of UNDP CO and RCU staff vis à vis the project team.  Discuss the roles, functions, and responsibilities within the project's decision-making structures, including reporting and communication lines, and conflict resolution mechanisms.  The Terms of Reference for project staff will be discussed again as needed.

b)     Based on the project results framework and the relevant SOF (e.g. GEF) Tracking Tool if appropriate, finalize the first annual work plan.  Review and agree on the indicators, targets and their means of verification, and recheck assumptions and risks. 

c)     Provide a detailed overview of reporting, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) requirements.  The Monitoring and Evaluation work plan and budget should be agreed and scheduled.

d)     Discuss financial reporting procedures and obligations, and arrangements for annual audit.

e)     Plan and schedule Project Board meetings.  Roles and responsibilities of all project organisation structures should be clarified and meetings planned.  The first Project Board meeting should be held within the first 12 months following the inception workshop.

Periodic Monitoring through site visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-term of project cycle:

The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation at the mid-point of project implementation (insert date).  The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  The organization, terms of reference and timing of the mid-term evaluation will be decided after consultation between the parties to the project document.  The Terms of Reference for this Mid-term evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.  The management response and the evaluation will be uploaded to UNDP corporate systems, in particular the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC)

The relevant SOF (GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the mid-term evaluation cycle. 

End of Project:

An independent Final Terminal Evaluation will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals. The Terms of Reference for this evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.

The Final Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities and requires a management response which should be uploaded to PIMS and to the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC)

The relevant SOF (e.g GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the final evaluation.

During the last three months, the project team will prepare the Project Terminal Report. This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Source: Bosnia and Herzegovina's UNDP Project Document (November 26, 2014).

Contacts: 
UNDP
Nataly Olofinskaya
Regional Technical Advisor
Raduska Cupac
UNDP Project Manager
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SCCF
Project Status: 
Map Caption: 

Vrbas River Basin

Display Photo: 

Generating Global Environmental Benefits from Improved Local Planning and Decision-making Systems in Burkina Faso

The project aims to address the inherent complexity and challenges that development institutions face when addressing global environmental issues. It aims to catalyze the mainstreaming of multi-lateral environmental agreements into development paths and processes in Burkina Faso by addressing key capacity gaps.  This is to be achieved by strengthening information management systems and by providing capacity development support to local planning and development processes.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-0.351562521361 12.9189065945)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$1,067,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$4,191,000
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project outcomes are as follows –

  1. Functioning, sustainable system for collecting, analyzing, storing and making available accurate and reliable data related to all three Rio Conventions – this will be achieved through the design of the data/information management system (Outcome 1.1); Improved protocols and standards for data collection (Outcome 1.2); The Environmental Observatory technically and materially strengthened to provide a coordinated and sustainable information collection and storage mechanism (Outcome 1.3) and; Collection of a set of cross-cutting global environment knowledge materials covering all three Conventions (Outcome 1.4)
  1. Enhanced institutional capacities to plan and implement development processes that contribute to implementing the Rio Convention – through development of a manual with guidelines on mainstreaming biodiversity, climate change, desertification, disaster management and wetlands management into key development planning and processes (Outcome 2.1); Training a large cadre of experts on the use of such a manual (Outcome 2.2); Practical application of the manual and guidelines to modify development programmes (Outcome 2.3); Global environmental benefits accruing from the implementation of the modified plans (Outcome 2.4) and; Legislation to formalize use of the Manual and guideline (Outcome 2.5)

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

CBA Bolivia: Knowledge and Tools for Sustainable Management of Water and Soils in Moro Moro (Natura)

In the municipality of Moro Moro, Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia, climate change impacts are already becoming apparent.  Livelihoods are primarily agricultural and pastoral, and baseline environmental challenges include serious deforestation and soil degradation on the steeply sloped pastures and farmlands. In addition to threatening agricultural productivity and farmer livelihoods, soil degradation and deforestation have serious implications for water quality and quantity for populations living downstream.

This Community-Based Adaptation project targets community awareness and adaptive capacity through an aggressive outreach and training component on sustainable forestry and resource management to protect native species, soils, and ecosystem services (flood, erosion, and landslide protection) from climate change risks. Lessons learned will be shared with neighboring municipalities.

This project is part of Bolivia's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((-64.8550384496 -18.0752576155, -64.7259490942 -18.0726465584, -64.6957366918 -18.1614006843, -64.8413055395 -18.1561810993, -64.8550384496 -18.0752576155))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Vulnerable Populations; Local Governments
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$34,875
Co-Financing Total: 
$42,165
Project Details: 

This project will focus on the municipality of Moro Moro in Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia.  Moro Moro is located in Bolivia’s “warm valleys” – an area of transition between the western high plains and the eastern lowlands.  The area is somewhat dry, with an average precipitation between 600 and 700 mm/yr, and a distinct rainy and dry season.  Temperature is largely determined by altitude.  Livelihoods are primarily agricultural and pastoral, and baseline environmental challenges include serious deforestation and soil degradation on the steeply sloped pastures and farmlands.  In addition to threatening agricultural productivity and farmer livelihoods, soil degradation and deforestation has serious implications for water quality and quantity for populations living downstream.

Climate change impacts are already becoming apparent in this part of Bolivia.  Projected impacts include increasing temperatures, increasingly intense yet erratic rainfall, and more marked seasonality – in turn increasing risks of both floods and droughts.  These pressures will worsen baseline land degradation pressures, and threaten to undermine other work on water and soil management being done in the region by the proponent and by its partners in IUCN and UNDP-Bolivia, which focus on integrated water resource management through an environmental services payment scheme.  Absent adaptation components, these measures will not be sustainable. 

This Community-Based Adaptation (CBA) project will compliment baseline activities by reforesting key hydrological capture zones and areas at risk from increasing erosion pressures.  The project will also directly target community awareness and adaptive capacity through an aggressive outreach and training component, while sharing lessons with neighboring municipalities.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Local knowledge regarding natural resources and changing climate used to inform municipal planning

Through use of participatory processes, develop a community- and science-informed plan for local-level adaptation (Output 1.1), including the compilation of information on community perceptions of climate change (Output 1.2).

Outcome 2: Establish local monitoring system for principal water sources

Execute physical and chemical analysis of local water flow parameters on the Moro Moro river (Output 2.1), as well as the installation of an automated climate measurement station (Output 2.2). Train community members in monitoring and analysis technologies (Output 2.3) in order to produce systematized information on community-based climate measurements (Output 2.4).

Outcome 3: Climate change adaptation practices developed

Afforest/reforest riparian fringes and non-vegetated land to minimize contamination, sedimentation and flood erosion risks (Output 3.1), while also protecting areas of sediment production (Output 3.2). Develop a plan to include private lands within adaptation frameworks through an environmental services payment scheme (Output 3.3).

Outcome 4: Climate change risk management integrated into municipal policy

Bring awareness of climate change risks to local government stakeholders (Output 4.1) and municipal residents (including children and youth) through workshops, short courses, and a student competition (Output 4.2). Bring consideration of climate change risks and adaptation to local and regional policies through a regional workshop on lessons learned from the Moro Moro project (Output 4.3).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring and evaluation for community-based adaptation is a new field, and the CBA project is piloting innovative approaches to evaluating the success of locally-driven adaptation projects, and generating lessons to inform ongoing practice.

Key considerations in M&E for CBA include:

  • Grounding M&E in the local context: M&E for CBA should avoid overly rigid frameworks, recognizing community heterogeneity and maintaining local relevance
  • Capturing global lessons from local projects: CBA projects are highly contextualized, but lessons generated should be relevant to stakeholders globally
  • Incorporation of both quantitative and qualitative indicators: to ground projects in tangible changes that can be objectively evaluated, and to capture lessons and case studies for global dissemination

To these ends, the CBA project uses three indicator systems: the Vulnerability Reduction Assessment, the Small Grants Programme Impact Assessment System, and the UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework.

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA)

The VRA is a question-based approach with the following aims:

  • To make M&E responsive to community priorities
  • To use M&E to make projects more accountable to local priorities
  • To make M&E capture community ideas and local knowledge
  • To gather community-level feedback to guide ongoing project management
  • To generate qualitative information
  • To capture lessons on specific issues within community-based adaptation
  • To generate case studies highlighting adaptation projects

The VRA follows UNDP's Adaptation Policy Framework, and is measured in a series of meetings with local community stakeholders. In these meetings, locally-tailored questions based on standard VRA questions/indicators are posed, and the community assigns a numerical score on a 1-10 scale for each question. Progress is evaluated through changes in scores over the course of implementation, as well as through qualitative data collected in community discussions surrounding the exercise.

UNDP has developed a Users Guide to the VRA (Espanol) (Francais) as a tool to assist practitioners to conceptualize and execute VRA measurements in the context of CBA projects.

The SGP Impact Assessment System (IAS)

The CBA, being a project of the GEF Strategic Priority on Adaptation, aims to increase the resilience of ecosystems and communities to the impacts of climate change, generating global environmental benefits, and increasing their resilience in the face of climate change impacts. To this end, the CBA projects use the SGP's impact assessment system for monitoring achievements in GEF focal areas (focusing primarily on biodiversity and sustainable land management).

The IAS is composed of a number of quantitative indicators which track biophysical ecosystem indicators, as well as policy impact, capacity development and awareness-building.

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework

CBA projects also track quantitative indicators from UNDP's adaptation indicator framework, corresponding to the thematic area on natural resources management. More information on UNDP's indicator framework can be found on the UNDP climate change adaptation monitoring and evaluation website.

 

This description applies to all projects implemented through UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation programme. Specific details on this project's M&E will be included here as they become available. *

Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 

Adaptation in Egypt through Integrated Coastal Zone Management

The essential objective of this project, Adaptation to climate change in the Nile Delta through Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Egypt, is to integrate the management of SLR risks into the development of Egypt’s Low Elevation Coastal Zone (LECZ) in the Nile Delta.

The dominant feature of Egypt's Northern Costal Zone is the low lying delta of the River Nile, with its large cities, industry, agriculture and tourism.   Due to the concentration of much of Egypt's infrastructure and development along the low coastal lands and the reliance on the Nile delta for prime agricultural land, coastal inundation or saline intrusion caused by anthropogenic climate change induced sea-level rise will have a direct and critical impact on Egypt's entire economy.  In addition to the current trends, Egypt's Mediterranean coast and the Nile Delta have been identified as highly vulnerable to climate change induced Sea Level Rise (SLR). The proposed project aims to integrate the management of SLR risks into the development of Egypt's Low Elevation Coastal Zone (LECZ) in the Nile Delta by strengthening the regulatory framework and institutional capacity to improve resilience of coastal settlements and development infrastructure, implement innovative and environmentally friendly measures that facilitate/promote adaptation in the Nile Delta, and establish a monitoring and assessment framework and knowledge management systems on adaptation. 

Source: UNDP Egypt Project Document (June 24, 2009)

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (29.8938232623 31.1998496697)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Egyptian rural and urban residents in low-lying areas in the Nile Delta subject to sea level rise (SLR) and salinization of freshwater resources.
Funding Source: 
Reports and Publications by country teams
Assessments and Background Documents
ProDocs
Financing Amount: 
4,000,000 (as of December 1, 2010)
Co-Financing Total: 
12,840,000 (as of December 1, 2010)
Project Details: 

One of the most certain consequences of global warming is a rise in mean sea level. As a result, coastal zones are regarded as one of the most vulnerable areas to climate change. In the coming decade, 3.3% of total land area of the Nile Delta will be lost to rising sea levels, including submersion of approximately 16 km2 of valuable currently cultivated land in the absence of adaptive action. In addition to the sea level rise (SLR) and current subsidence trends, Egypt’s Mediterranean coast and the Nile Delta have been identified as highly vulnerable to abrupt SLR, which is considered to be due to climate change.

The Nile Delta’s coastal lakes are key ecosystems that act as a protective zone for inland economic activities. Lake Manzala, Burullus, Idku, and Maryut, however, are only separated from the Mediterranean by 0.5- 3km wide eroding and retreating sand belt and dune system.  Rising seas would destroy parts of the protective offshore sand belt, which has already been weakened by reduced sediment flows after the construction of the Aswan Dam in 1964. The sediment belt protects the lagoons and low-lying reclaimed land. Without this sediment belt, water quality in coastal freshwater lagoons will be altered, groundwater will be salted and recreational tourism and beach facilities will be inundated. 

The goal of the project is to enhance Egypt’s resilience and reduce vulnerability to Climate Change impacts. The objective of the proposed projects is to integrate the management of sea level rise risks into the development of Egypt’s Low Elevation Coastal Zone (LECZ) in the Nile Delta by taking an “adaptive capacity approach” for both human and natural systems.

The project will have three major outcomes. First, the regulatory framework and institutional capacity to improve resilience of coastal settlements and infrastructure will be strengthened. Second, strategies and measures that facilitate adaptation to climate change impacts, with sea level rise (SLR) in particular; will be implemented in vulnerable coastal areas in the Nile Delta. And third, monitoring/assessment frameworks and knowledge management systems will be established to facilitate adaptive management in the face of unfolding climate change impacts.

The first and third major outcomes target the adaptive capacity of the institutions responsible for coastal zone management. The second outcome targets the implementation of proactive adaptation measures to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of coastal lagoons in the Nile Delta that are both highly productive and particularly vulnerable to future sea level rise and have been identified through stakeholder processes as environmental hotspots and priority areas for adaptation. The second outcome will be achieved through installation of a set of innovative shoreline protection strategies modeled after the “Living Shorelines Approach” in the Idku, Burullus, and Manzala coastal lagoons. The third outcome will capture key lessons and transfer through various national and international platforms for further replication of good practices and scaling up.

According to the 2006 Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CPAMS) census figures, the population, (including those living abroad), is estimated to have reached 76.5 million at a growth rate of 37% over the 1996 figure of 59.3 million. United Nations projections indicate that the population will continue to grow to 95.6 million by 2026 and 114.8 million before it stabilizes in 2065. Population in urban areas increased by 40 % and is now at nearly 31 million people, and rural populations grew by 64% to roughly 41.6 million people. The rate of unemployment is estimated at 9.31%. CPAMS also estimates, in 2007, that 12 million people or ~16% of Egypt’s population live in slum communities. UNSTATS (2000) also estimates that 17% of the population lives below the national poverty line.

Source: UNDP Egypt Project Document (June 24, 2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Enhanced capacity to improve resilience of coastal settlements and development infrastructure is strengthened
    • Output 1.1: Modified coastal development legislation and regulations (focusing on ICZM and EIA)
    • Output 1.2: Strengthened institutional capacity of the NCIZMC and other key institutions to support the mainstreaming of climate risks and implementation of adaptation measures 
    • Output 1.3: Information systems established that reflect climate change impacts on coastal zones
    • Output 1.4: Budgetary planning of Shore Protection Agency reflects adaptation needs
  • Outcome 2: Innovative and environmentally friendly coastal zone adaptation measures enforced in the framework of Nile Delta ICZM
    • Output 2.1: Innovative adaptation pilot activities implemented to protect vulnerable coastal lagoons
    • Output 2.2: Socio-economic assessment and adaptation option appraisal
    • Output 2.3: Introduction of climate risk assessment into ICZM system for Nile Delta
  • Outcome 3: An enhanced M&E framework and knowledge management system in place
    • Output 3.1: M&E system with measurable indicators introduced
    • Output 3.2: Lessons codified and disseminated through the ALM
    • Output 3.3: Lessons disseminated throughout Egyptian Institutions

Source: UNDP Egypt Project Document (June 24, 2009)

 

 
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits: UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Establish a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP Egypt Project Document (June 24, 2009)

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Mohamed Bayoumi
Country Officer
Mohamed Aly
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Enhancing Adaptive Capacity and Resilience to Climate Change in the Agriculture Sector in Mali

According to current information on climatic variability and predicted climate change scenarios for Mali, the country's long-term development is expected to be significantly affected by: both insufficient and unpredictable rainfall; increased frequency of flooding; and more violent winds in the Sahel and Sahara regions. As Mali's agriculture sector is highly dependent on climatic factors, it is generally agreed upon that climate change will produce great impacts in this sector, even when considering the uncertainty of the forecasting models. Scientific assessments carried out in the context of the Initial National Communication (INC) and the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) has shown that climate change will most probably lead to significant losses in crop production. In turn, these impacts on the agriculture sector will have direct effects on food security in the country. 

Contributions to respond to these barriers and reduce the level of vulnerabilities to climate change were achieved through the pursuit of specific outcomes including: (i) the improvement of capacities to prevent and manage the impacts of climate change on agricultural production and food security; (ii) the strengthening of climate resilience of agricultural production systems and the most vulnerable agro-pastoral communities; and (iii) the dissemination of the best practices generated by the project.

This project was initially funded through the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund (US$2,340,000), with later complementary funding from the Canada-UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Facility (CCAF) of US$2,145,000.

As part of the Canada-UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Facility (CCAF), the project is aligned with the CCAF’s aims to strengthen climate-resilient approaches to agriculture and water management, with an emphasis on gender-sensitive approaches. The Facility works to document results and share experiences between the CCAF-supported projects in Cambodia, Cape Verde, Haiti, Mali, Niger and Sudan.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-4.19296108792 14.4999654557)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
2,340,000 (As of March 25, 2010)
Co-Financing Total: 
8,480,000 (As of March 25, 2010)
Project Details: 

Though only 14% of Mali’s land is considered to be cultivable, the country’s economy is nevertheless strongly dependent on agriculture. In fact, Mali’s economy is largely dominated by the primary sector, which employs 83.4% of the working population. The secondary and tertiary sectors of the economy are still not well developed. They employ 4.1% and 12.5% of the active population, respectively. The agricultural sector in Mali is very sensitive to climate variations including droughts and desertification, both of which have been occurring for several decades. Increasing demographic pressure has led to the conversion of the marginal or forested land into agricultural land and has consequently caused a shortening of the fallow periods and a general degradation of the soil’s fertility.

According to the World Bank, despite annual variability due to repeated shocks, Mali’s economic growth has been generally favorable in recent years, averaging 5.1% per year for the 2003-07 period. Mali’s economy did not perform as well in 2007 due to unfavorable weather conditions and technical difficulties that affected gold production. Mali’s macroeconomic stability has been maintained in 2008 despite the world economic crisis but in spite of these recent trends, Mali remains one of the world's poorest countries and ranks 168 out of 179 countries, according to the 2008 UNDP Human Development Index.

With 83.4% of the population working in the primary sector, availability of and access to natural resources are a first priority for the Malian people, both factors being particularly vulnerable to climate change. As Mali’s agricultural sector is highly dependent on climatic factors, it is generally agreed upon that climate change will produce great impacts in this sector.

Scientific assessments carried out in the context of the Initial National Communication (INC) have shown that climate change will most probably lead to significant losses in crop production. Generally speaking, the area suitable for agriculture, the length of the growing season and potential yield, particularly along the margins of semi-arid and arid areas, are expected to decrease. Climate change could also have the potential to impact livestock by affecting factors such as animal health and the availability of fodder. The impact of these could differ depending on the type of species. Some species such as goats and sheep are more heat tolerant than cattle and thus could potentially withstand higher temperatures with more success. However, large farms are more dependent on species such as cattle, which are not heat tolerant.

Climate change will alter the quantity and quality of available natural pastures and will undoubtedly lead to new forms of transhumance corridors in the region, and perhaps to new forms of emerging animal diseases. It is also likely that breeders will have to deal with growing agricultural pressures and greater environmental constraints in the years to come. Another possible impact of climate change on the agricultural and food security sectors is the potential conflicts occurring between farmers and pastoralists as both land and water become scarce. With increasing population, transhumance can become unsustainable, and it will become more important for livestock breeders, investors and governments to give more attention to animal feed processing.

The above mentioned impacts on the agricultural sector will, in turn, have direct impacts on food security in Mali. To ensure food security in the context of expected climate change will be difficult given the low level of capacity of the Malian decision makers at all levels and of the food producers to implement adaptation measures. Capacities of decision makers and of food producers need to be strengthened in order to reduce the potential adverse impacts of climate change and its potential repercussion on national food security.  Moreover, measures including: improved crop varieties to deal with droughts; livelihood and production diversification; improved use of meteorological information and alert systems; and the development of new crop systems to name but a few, will have to be piloted and disseminated in the most vulnerable areas of the country.

Source: UNDP Mali Project Document (March 25, 2010)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Capacities to prevent and manage the impacts of climate change on agricultural production and food security are improved
    • Output 1.1: Analysis of economic impacts of climate change on the agricultural and food security sectors are conducted within the targeted municipalities
    • Output 1.2: Guidelines are elaborated and awareness-raising campaign and training workshops (targeting local decision makers) are conducted in order to promote the integration of adaptation considerations within rural development policies, plans and programmes at the local level
    • Output 1.3: Local adaptation financing strategies are established
    • Output 1.4: Technical structures supporting rural development are informed, trained and provided with the tools to support the implementation of adaptation measures in order to manage climate risks
    • Output 1.5: A strategy for the integration of adaptation considerations within national level agriculture- and food security-related laws, policies, plans and programmes is developed and implemented
  • Outcome 2: Climate resilience of agricultural production systems and of the most vulnerable agro-pastoral communities strengthened
    • Output 2.1: An increased number of municipalities benefit from high quality agro-meteorological services
    • Output 2.2: Resilient agro-pastoral practices and technologies that reduce climate change risks are put in place in the most vulnerable agricultural zones 
    • Output 2.3: Resilient income-generating activities are adopted by vulnerable groups and individuals
    • Output 2.4: Adequate financial climate risks transfer instruments aimed at the most vulnerable rural communities, are developed
  • Outcome 3: Best practices generated by the program capitalized on and disseminated at the national level
    • Output 3.1: Lessons learned from the project are identified using a systematic framework
    • Output 3.2: Lessons learned are shared with other municipalities and local stakeholders
    • Output 3.3: Lessons learned are shared with other national and international stakeholders

Source: UNDP Mali Project Document (March 25, 2010)

 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start Goals

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP Mali Project Document (March 25, 2010)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Clotilde Goeman
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Oumar Tamboura
Country Officer
UNDP
Aminata Diarra
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Capacities to prevent and manage the impacts of climate change on agricultural production and food security are improved

Outcome 2 - Climate resilience of agricultural production systems and of the most vulnerable agro-pastoral communities strengthened

Outcome 3 - Best practices generated by the program capitalized on and disseminated at the national level

Combating the Effects of Climate Change on Agricultural Production and Food Security in CAR

This project is well aligned with GEF objective related to "Increase adaptive capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change, including variability, at local and national level" through the pursuit of specific project outcomes including: i) Policy, institutional and financial capacities developed and strengthened to plan for and manage climate change risks to the agricultural sector; ii) Adapted agro-pastoral options implemented in key vulnerable areas; ii) knowledge/experiences shared, capitalized and disseminated. 

This project is well aligned with the national priorities defined in the first National Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper. Agriculture development and sustainability is a key issue in the third pillar of the "Rebuild and Diversify the economy" national plan which is designed to address poverty issues in urban and rural areas The main sub programs are related to institutional capacity building to plan, conduct research, and supervise. These sub programs are also linked with goals 1 and 7 of the MDGs. 

Source: UNDP CAR Project Identification Form (November 23, 2010)

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (18.5827301377 4.36194473816)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
2,780,000 (As of December 30, 2009)
Co-Financing Total: 
5,560,000 (As of December 30, 2009)
Project Details: 

In recent years, CAR has suffered from political instability and endured recurring internal conflicts. Despite vast natural resources, the Central African Republic is one of the least developed countries in the world (LDC) group. In 2009, GDP per capita was estimated at approximately US$362, which puts the CAR among the bottom five poorest countries in the world. The prevalence of extreme poverty has increased, with a particularly high concentration of poor people in rural areas where inhabitants are unable to meet the costs of food.

In the framework of economic recovery and improvement of social conditions, the Central African Republic seeks to revitalize the food and agricultural sector to contribute to shared, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth and development, provide food and nutritional security, increase employment and income, and measurably reduce poverty. This project is designed as a contribution to the achievement of MDG 1.

As the backbone of the Central African Republic's economy, the agriculture sector is dominated by agro- pastoral production, involving nearly 74% of the active population and representing 45% of GDP. Agricultural and pastoralist systems are found along a bioclimatic gradient running north to south from the dry Sudanian to the humid Guinean zones with the different agricultural systems, including cattle farming, matched closely with rainfall. Due to its geographical situation, the country produces a wide range of crops, for cash (sugar cane, cotton, coffee) and for food (cassava, rice, sorghum, groundnut, maize). Cattle farming are essentially dominated by extensive herding (transhumance).

Despite significant potential, yields are very low and most of the rural inhabitants, as indicated above, remain in extreme poverty. Several factors affect production such as heavy reliance on rain-fed agriculture and ongoing practices regarding crop selection, water resource management, and agro-ecosystem and rangeland management. Part of the country is already seriously affected by severe land degradation, especially in the region around Bangui where there's high demand for foodstuffs. Co-existence between herders and farmers have been decreasing over the past years due to mismanagement of ecosystem services and natural resources leading to conflicts over competition for access to diminishing stocks of land and water.

Additional vulnerability drivers are related to (i) diminished public safety affecting a wide part of the country and causing refugee migration; and (ii) a dearth of basic investment in agriculture over the past 20 years (weak support from extension services, no access to credit, limited market access, etc.). On the whole, public services at national and local levels have suffered, and agricultural extension services as well as meteorological support services are therefore very limited. Private sector involvement in the agriculture sector is limited to cash crops, which is the only area exhibiting the use of conventional inputs (fertilizers, pesticides, HYV seeds) though on a reduced level.

Climate Change is an additional threat for agriculture and food security. The Initial National Communication and the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) have clearly highlighted major climate change driven risks. For the past years, it has been increasingly difficult to identify the optimal time to plant crops. In the humid Guinean area (south of the country), the short dry season, previously lasting, on average, one month, has for the past several years exceeded two months. In many regions, reduced soil moisture is considered to be a factor in sub-optimal cereal yields. The increase in temperatures and decrease in rainfall has led to the reduction of the cool period, resulting in increased evaporation and soil desiccation, factors causing disruption in the supply of water to the cotton crop. The phenomenon also affects cassava, leading to slower plant growth and tuber development and a corresponding reduction in production. With sugar, there are phenological and physiological effects with consequent reduction in output.

Over the coming years, climate change is expected to increasingly lead to changes in rainfall patterns with droughts occurring more frequently and lasting longer, and an increase in extreme events. The increase in temperature and the decrease in rainfall will lead to further reductions in duration of the rainy season, increasing evaporation and desiccation of already poor soils and impacting agricultural calendars. The phenomenon will affect food crops such as cassava as well as other crops such as millet, maize or peanuts. It is also likely to have negative impacts on cash crops (cotton, coffee) while during their critical growth periods. Pastoralism, the livelihood for a significant number of rural people, may also be affected by the change in rainfall patterns, as access to water is crucial during transhumance. This, in turn, is likely to exacerbate conflicts with farmers.

In the context of the above underlying-causes, the performance of the agricultural sector and its capacity to adapt are limited. The CAR Government, with support from a few donors (FAO, EU), tried recently to revitalize the sector through the implementation of baseline activities which include various agriculture and rural development initiatives focusing primarily on stimulating rural economies by improving agricultural productivity (see D and E, below). While necessary for the overall development of the sector, these interventions are insufficient to ensure resilience of the agriculture and food production sector to overcome climate change risks.

In order to respond to the greatest and most immediate threats of climate change, the government of CAR prepared a National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA), which prioritized a number of interventions that should enhance the adaptive capacity of the agriculture sector. These include: promoting drought-adapted seeds, rehabilitation of degraded land, establishment of an early warning system. 

Source: UNDP CAR Project Identification Form (November 23, 2010)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Policy, institutional and financial capacities developed and strengthened to plan for and manage climate change risks to the agricultural sector
    • Output 1.1: Long term planning tools developed to facilitate mainstreaming of climate change into policies
    • Output 1.2: Climate change adaptation and measures and finance options integrated into PRSP, Rural Development Strategy, local development plans, and other appropriate policies
  • Outcome 2: Adapted agro-pastoral options implemented in key vulnerable areas
    • Output 2.1: Strategic Action Plan for the internalization of climate change risks into conservation of Plant Genetic Resource for Food and Agriculture (PGRFA) developed (with support from co-financing)
    • Output 2.2: Climate resilient agro-pastoral practice and technologies (e.g. water management and soil fertility, pasture and rangeland management) demonstrated in Bangui and the surrounding regions (ex. Bambari and Sibut)
    • Output 2.3: Appropriate seasonal and other long-term climate change including variability information disseminated to rural farmers and breeders
  • Outcome 3: Knowledge and experiences shared, capitalized, and disseminated
    • Output 3.1: Awareness and capacity built to facilitate the process of integrating climate change risks and adaptation into agricultural strategies
    • Output 3.2: Project lessons codified and disseminated while learning and exchange mechanisms are put in place

Source: UNDP CAR Project Identification Form (November 23, 2010)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP CAR Project Identification Form (November 23, 2010)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Aline Malibangar
Country Officer
UNDP
Mame Diop
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 

Identification and Implementation of Adaptation Response Measures in the Drini-Mati River Deltas

The Drini and Mati River Deltas in Albania are experiencing stressful impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems as a result of climate change. There is currently a lack of institutional and individual capacities to undertake a rigorous assessment or to address the potential climate change impacts on biodiversity. The aim of this project is to address key risks and vulnerabilities in the coastal areas of Drini Mati River Deltas of the Northern Adriatic by developing the capacity to adapt to climate change. The key lessons learned thus far with regard to the adaptation project have been: engaging in broad stakeholder consultation during project design; building regional collaboration and support from project inception; ensuring coordination among multiple stakeholders during implementation stage; focusing on strengthening local institutional and human capacity; remaining focused, pragmatic and strategic about scope, objectives and outcomes.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (19.5831329371 41.7076736223)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Communities in the Drini and Mati River Deltas in Albania.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
Total amount: US$1,959,500 (as of July 2010); GEF (SPA): US$975,000; UNDP: US$60,000
Co-Financing Total: 
Government of Albania: $140,000; Government of Albania (parallel): $740,000; Regional Environmental Centre (parallel); $44,500
Project Details: 

The Drini and Mati River Deltas (DMRD) are two of the three deltas on the northern Adriatic coast of Albania. DRMD represents a
complex and compound system of sandy belts, capes, bays, lagoons and island areas. They also harbour significant biodiversity
values in three types of habitats: marine, wetlands and non‐wetland habitats, including forests, shrubs, and open fields where
traditional agriculture is practiced. Biodiversity is one of the most important assets of Lezha region, in which DMRD lies. The Drini
Delta is an internationally recognized Important Bird Area, providing wintering grounds for the endangered pygmy cormorant and
over 70 other species of waterfowl and water birds. The Patok lagoon, within the Mati Delta, serves as an important feeding area for
globally endangered loggerhead turtles.

Climate change has the potential to undermine biodiversity conservation efforts in the DRMD’s protected areas, unless the system
accommodates uncertainty and management strategies are put in place to respond to climate‐related stress. According to Albania’s
first comprehensive vulnerability and adaptation assessment, conducted as part of the preparation of the First National
Communication (FNC), the DMRD is critically vulnerable to climate change and requires adaptation measures to be put in place.
Scenarios for Albania predict an annual increase in temperature of up to 3.6ºC, a decrease in precipitation of 12.5%, and
consequent reductions of water resources and arable land (due to soil erosion and alteration) by the year 2100. In the coastal
zones, an increase in sea surface temperature as well as sea level rise (SLR) of up to 61 centimetres is expected to place additional
stress on marine and littoral biodiversity as well as livelihoods of local communities. SLR, more frequent and intense floods,
frequent inundation, and submersion of low lying coastal areas could affect life cycles of various species and result in habitat loss
and fragmentation. Rising temperatures will also affect the composition and distribution of DRMD’s marine and terrestrial species.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The overall development goal of this medium size project is to assist Albania in establishing a mechanism by which strategies to moderate, cope with, and take advantage of the consequences of climate change are enhanced, developed, and implemented. The specific objective of the project is to build adaptive capacities in the DMRD to ensure resilience of the key ecosystems and local livelihoods to climate change. This will be done by first identifying, and then integrating climate change response measures into development programming in the DMRD.

This objective will be achieved through the following outcomes:

Outcome 1: Capacities to monitor and respond to anticipated climate change impacts in the DMRD at the institutional and community levels developed

  • Output 1.1:    A system for monitoring climate change and its impacts on the DMRD ecosystem is in place
  • Output 1.2:    Local government institutions have the capacity to analyze data on climate variability and associated ecological impacts and integrate this into decision making
  • Output 1.3:    Community capacities to understand the impacts of climate fluctuations and expected changes on natural ecosystems and local livelihoods are developed

Outcome 2: DMRD region’s conservation and development programmes, plans and policies integrate climate change risks and take local pilot actions for coastal adaptation

  • Output 2.1    A package of amendments to biodiversity conservation activities within protected areas of the DMRD aimed at integrating adaptation measures is prepared and implementation is initiated
  • Output 2.2    A package of amendments to sustainable development activities in the wider landscape surrounding protected areas in the DMRD aimed at integrating adaptation measures is prepared and implementation is initiated

Outcome 3: Capacity for adaptive management, monitoring and evaluation, learning, and replication of project lessons developed.

  • Output 3.1:    System for monitoring and evaluation of project impacts established
Contacts: 
UNDP
Elvita Kabashi
Country Office Focal Point
UNDP
Eglantina Bruci
Project Manager
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
spa
Project Status: 

Building Capacity for Climate-Resilient Food Production in DRC

This project, 'Building Capacity in DRC to Respond to Threats Posed by Climate Change on Food Production and Security', seeks to respond to the climate-change induced increased variability in agro-climatic conditions and its impacts on the agriculture sector in the DRC. The agriculture sector forms the basis of livelihood opportunities for the majority of the population.  Although increased rainfall is expected in most parts of the country, model predictions of rainfall distribution (temporal) is uncertain. There is however a high likelihood of the potential for longer intra-seasonal drought.  The project seeks to reduce vulnerability among rural populations in four selected sites by promoting: the renewal of agro-genetic material through provision of germplasm more suited for expected climate conditions, as well as the creation or strengthening of the agricultural chain of support (extension services, technological tools, agro-meteorological information and planning) from local to provincial and national levels.   Building on current rehabilitation and reconstruction efforts, including efforts to promote decentralization and to reform the public sector, the project will facilitate the demonstration of adaptation measures relevant to planning at all levels, taking into account regional specificities.  

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (23.9502044753 -6.71919225993)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The ultimate beneficiaries of the project are local agricultural households residing in villages surrounding each selected site.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
3,000,000.00 (As of July 10, 2012)
Co-Financing Total: 
4,050,000.00 (As of July 10, 2012)
Project Details: 

Building on the ongoing reforms and rehabilitation efforts, this project will seek to enhance the resilience of the agriculture sector by providing the tools, information, inputs and capacities to the main actors of agricultural development to enable them to adequately understand, analyse and react to climate risks. The project will demonstrate appropriate adaptation responses so as to test and pilot their feasibility and replicability. Adaptation responses will tackle agricultural production, as well as economic diversification and institutional capacity development as an integrated package of interventions designed to remove major barriers and reduce underlying causes of vulnerability. Similar adaptation options will be tested in all of the four areas, except where predicted climate conditions warrant different choices, for example: groundwater extraction potential will be tested only in Kipopo area, which is foreseen to experience more droughts and an overall decrease in rainfall, whereas rainwater harvesting and rainwater conservation will be promoted in the other three regions. 

Similarly, adapted varieties disseminated in each of the region will be tested for resilience to current and anticipated climate conditions specific to each region (to adapt to sunshine, heat, precipitation and soil moisture). The project will support the deployment of a supply chain for adapted agricultural genetic material focused on three staple crops (maize, rice and cassava) based on research conducted by the National Agricultural Research Service (INERA).  Adapted genetic material will be transferred to designated agri-multipliers, who will produce and multiply seeds and cuttings for distribution among households.  This production and dissemination of adapted material will be supported by training and capacity building in sustainable and adapted agricultural management techniques (e.g. agroforestry, sustainable land and water management, agro-ecology) provided through the national agricultural extension services (SNV), along with the provision of enhanced and timely agro-meteorological information (including early warning bulletins, using rural radio and local associations and leaders). “No-regrets” land and water management practices will be promoted, in anticipation for changes in the precipitation regimes (droughts or floods). For example, rainwater harvesting and conservation, combined with improved irrigation during dry spells will be promoted, along with agricultural techniques designed to maintain soil fertility.

In parallel, participatory research will be conducted in order to explore the potential for local agricultural diversification (crop and non-crop, e.g. non-timber forest products, aquaculture and livestock), as a means to provide stability and a more resilient food basket to the local communities.The creation of early warning systems at decentralized level will be tested in each of the four sites, and will be implemented through the creation of interdisciplinary working groups bringing together key rural development stakeholders and institutions and technical services, who will develop appropriate methodologies for declaring and disseminating early warnings to households and communities. 

In order to support the implementation of these adaptation measures, and to provide adequate and continuous support to vulnerable communities, the project will aim to strengthen institutional capacity at national and decentralized levels, namely through the upgrading of skills and strengthening or rehabilitation of infrastructure.  Support will be provided to national and provincial agricultural institutions (INERA, SENASEM, SNV and Ministry of Agriculture) to better understand and integrate climate change impacts into their ongoing planning and into the delivery of community support services.  It is expected that the demonstration of successful adaptation alternatives at local level will help leverage agricultural policy changes. Activities at the national, provincial and local level will be implemented so as to be mutually reinforcing:

  • At the local level: The ultimate beneficiaries of the project are local agricultural households residing in villages surrounding each selected site.  In addition to receiving agricultural inputs such as resilient varieties, communities will be mobilized, and their associations and groups will be strengthened through the transfer of appropriate agricultural technologies and know-how.  In order to further reduce vulnerability and to address non-climate change related vulnerabilities, efforts will be made to promote diversified sources of livelihoods (non-agricultural) as well as diversified sources of food (beyond the three vulnerable staple crops). 
  • At the provincial level: Project sites have been selected so as to represent provincial realities, and benefit from the presence of government institutions, decentralized technical services, as well as proximity to provincial capitals and authorities.  Decentralized technical services will benefit from targeted capacity building efforts so as to update skills and upgrade operational means, in order to enable them to deliver appropriate services in support of local communities.  In addition, provincial sectoral planners will also be supported in the development of resilient agricultural plans, through interventions directed towards the Regional Rural Agricultural Councils, and the national extension services.  Provincial level institutions will serve as the key relays of information regarding the development of early warnings.
  • At the national level: Overall coordination of the project will take place at the national level in order to ensure replicability of the project outcomes.  In addition, national-level ministries will be called upon to contribute to the project through their decentralized antennas, as well as benefit from capacity development towards a better integration of climate change issues into sectoral plans of relevance to this project.

In summary, the project will function as a means to place first emphasis on the delivery of improved services to local communities in order to reduce their vulnerability to climate change, as well as to address some of the underlying causes of vulnerability.  Project sites have been selected to be situated in proximity of a research station, which will enable the production, multiplication and dissemination of enhanced agricultural genetic material.  Project sites also benefit from ongoing extension services (provided through provincial authorities and delegations), on which this project will build.  Lessons learned from local on-the-ground interventions, including pilot demonstrations of early warning systems, will be transferred to provincial planners for replication and upscaling, so as to inform provincial agricultural planning and decision-making.  These together are expected to generate a leverage effect on national agricultural policy-making, with the assistance of specific tools provided to national planners through this project.

Source: UNDP DRC Project Document (November 16, 2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Climate resilience of crop systems used by rural populations is improved
    • Output 1.1: An operational supply chain for the production and diffusion of climate-tolerant varieties of maize, cassava and rice
    • Output 1.2: Adoption by farmers of adapted and sustainable farming techniques
    • Output 1.3: Adoption of diversified climate-resilient livelihood activities.
    • Output 1.4:  Updated crop calendars and technological packets
  • Outcome 2: The technical capacities of small farmers and agricultural institutions are strengthened
    • Output 2.1: Updated skills on climate risk management
    • Output 2.2: An Hydro-Agro-Climatic advisory network
    • Output 2.3: An early warning system (linked to output 2.2)
  • Outcome 3:  Best practices are captured and disseminated
    • Output 3.1: Increased awareness on climate change and adaptation

Source: UNDP DRC Project Document (November 16, 2009)

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP DRC Project Document (November 16, 2009)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Charles Wasikama
Country Officer
Jean Ndembo
Project Coordinator
UNDP
Mame Diop
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 

Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

The TACC project will support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming in developing countries by:

  1. Developing partnerships with UN and specialised agencies, national and sub-national governments, centres of excellence and regional technical institutions, and the private sector;
  2. Making available methodologies and tools for long-term climate change participatory planning to regions and cities and sharing best practices;
  3. Providing regions with information about climate change challenges and opportunities and technical and financial solutions;
  4. Providing technical support to up to 20 regions for the preparation of regional climate change plans, including identification of priority mitigation and adaptation measures; and
  5. Providing technical support to up to 20 regions to identify policy and financing instruments to implement priority climate change measures.

For more information on project activities read the TACC - 2011 Update or the TACC - 2012 Update.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-21.4801 -8.29677)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
Project Details: 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Sub-national authorities to have identified risks and opportunities related to climate change at the territorial level and integrated priority mitigation and adaptation measures into sustainable development planning and programming, taking into consideration gender aspects and aligned and coordinated with existing climate change projects in the region.

  • Outcome 1: Partnerships established and operational with UN and specialised agencies, national and sub‐national governments, centres of excellence and regional technical institutions, and/or the private sector.
  • Outcome 2: Methodologies and tools for long‐term climate change participatory planning are developed and made available, and best practices shared with regions and cities.
  • Outcome 3: Regions are aware of climate change challenges and opportunities and of available technical and financial solutions.
  • Outcome 4: Technical support is provided to 20 regions in developing countries for the preparation of their regional climate change plans, including identification of priority mitigation and adaptation measures.
  • Outcome 5: Technical support is provided to 20 regions to identify possible policy and financing instruments to implement priority climate change measures.

 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Partnerships Bureau
Hub for Innovative Partnerships
UNDP
Christophe Nuttall
Director, Hub for Innovative Partnerships
UNDP
Berta Pesti
Technical Specialist Climate Change and Partnerships
UNDP
Leslie Ouarzazi
Programme Specialist Climate Change and Partnerships
UNDP
Stephen Gold
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Reducing Risks and Vulnerability to Flooding and Drought in Nicaragua

Climate variability, especially during El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes, results in droughts that cause significant losses, particularly affecting the agricultural sector on which Nicaraguans' food security depends.  This project is designed to reduce drought and flooding risks generated by climate change and variability in the Estero Real River watershed. To reach this objective, this project relies upon a coordinated set of interventions designed to implement new public policies for addressing climate change by introducing agro-ecological practices and participatory watershed management in highly vulnerable rural communities. Through targeted investments in water retention, long-term farm planning, and institutional capacity building in local communities, municipalities and government agencies, the project will validate an adaptation scheme as a vehicle for implementation of the national climate change strategy.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-87.2548 12.9389)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Farmers; Rural Families
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$5,500,950 (amount requested and approved 2010-12-15)
Co-Financing Total: 
N/A
Project Details: 

Nicaragua is extremely susceptible to natural hazards, including hurricanes, destructive earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and landslides.  Moreover, flooding and droughts present some of the most challenging natural phenomena to contend with. The areas that will be most affected by climate change are those currently classified as dry zones, such as the northern region and the municipalities in the departments of Chinandega and León, where the current project will be located.

In these areas, higher temperatures and increasing rainfall variability combined with more intense events will aggravate current conditions of water scarcity and extreme poverty. Under changed climate conditions, it is estimated that these areas will receive an average annual rainfall of 500mm, which will have significant repercussions for agricultural and livestock activities, and will also affect both water quantity and quality.

This project seeks to reduce climate change-related risks from droughts and flooding Estero Real River watershed. This will be achieved through investments in water storage infrastructure and climate resilient agro-ecological practice pilots for family farms in the designated project areas.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1: Investments in infrastructure for storing and using rain and surface water in eight micro-watersheds in the upper watershed of the Estero Real River.

Create two communal irrigation systems in two micro-watershed (Output 1.1) and at least 880 rainwater collection and storage facilities in eight micro-watersheds (Output 1.2) to supply family farms. Train and organize at least 100 farm families in management, efficient use and maintenance of their communal and individual irrigation systems and water storage facilities (Output 1.3).

Component 2: Introduction of climate resilient agro-ecological practices to make effective use of available water.

Prepare agro-ecological farm transformation plans with at least 1000 farm families to use their own resources and available credit for implementation (Output 2.1). In each micro-watershed, convert at least 140 hectares to water-conscious and climate resilient agro-ecological production (Output 2.2) and at least 50 hectares in water system recharge areas and riparian zones (Output 2.3).

Component 3: Institutional development and capacity building in micro-watersheds, municipalities, and participating national institutions.

Work with local organizations in eight micro-watersheds to prepare and implement climate-resilient management plans (Output 3.1) and establish inter-institutional coordinating bodies in El Sauce, Achuapa, and Villanueva to arrange governmental and NGO work plans (Output 3.2). Design proposals for instruments to build resilience and for operation of a Villanueva River sub-watershed committee (Output 3.3), and facilitate the adoption of climate adaptation measures in nine municipalities’ plans and policies (Output 3.4).

Component 4: Ongoing monitoring and analysis of climatic conditions and changes in land use, water flows and soil quality.

Identify hydraulic works needed to reduce flooding in lower Villanueva River basin (Output 4.1). Establish ongoing participation monitoring of water flows and quality, soil conditions, and land use changes (Output 4.2), along with electronic information posts, monitoring data dissemination, and preparation of maps for farmers, organizations, and users of the National Environmental Information System (SINIA) (Output 4.3).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Programme monitoring and evaluation will be carried out by the Programme Team and the UNDP-Country Office in accordance with established UNDP procedures.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Gabor Vereczi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
AF
Project Status: