Ecuador

 

Ecuador faces a variety of climate change risks associated with changes in temperature and precipitation, as well as possible alterations to ocean currents. Given its geographical location and rugged topography, Ecuador is a highly vulnerable country to impacts of climate change (UNFCCC First National Communication, Quito, 2000). Periodic El Niño events, particularly those of 1982-83 and 1997-98, have demonstrated the catastrophic effects of climate variability in the country. This high degree of exposure, combined with the vulnerability of key economic sectors such as agriculture, health, energy, water resources, coastal resources, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism, reinforces the notion that Ecuador is a country particularly vulnerable to climate change.

Characterized by extreme diversity of climate zones, Ecuador boasts an extraordinary array of geographical systems that range from high altitude glaciers to tropical rain forests in the Amazon upper tributaries to dry tropical forest on the Pacific Coast, as well as an insular outpost in the Pacific with the Galapagos Islands, a World Heritage Site. Some of these systems show a greater sensitivity to climate change, or at least are considered most likely to undergo rapid changes as a result of climate change, including variability. As highlighted in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Summary Report, such ecosystems provide a range of environmental services that are critical to rural livelihoods and urban welfare. As these systems deteriorate due to various direct and indirect factors, including climate change, the quality of environmental goods and services also decreases.

There is a UNDP-GEF project working to mainstream climate change adaptation into water management practices in Ecuador through the integration of climate change risks in key national and local development plans, the implementation of adaptation measures, information management, and knowledge sharing. At the national level, the project will improve water governance by incorporating climate risks and vulnerability assessments into water management and decision making processes. At the local level, interventions will take place in specific provinces (Los Rios, Manabi, Loja, and Azuay) that have been identified based on climate change vulnerability assessments and stakeholder consultations.

Source: GEF Project Details: Ecuador - Enabling Ecuador to Prepare its First National Communication in Response to its Commitments to UNFCCC. Accessed online at: http://gefonline.org/projectDetailsSQL.cfm?projID=629 on 12 November 2009.

Like most countries in Latin America, Ecuador has submitted one national communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) with a second one under preparation. The Second National Communication is under preparation and scheduled to be completed by March 2010. One of the components of this Communication will be the National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as a revised GHG national inventory. A National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy has been proposed by the Ministry of Environment and will be included in the Second National Communication.

Land use change and forestry are the largest contributors to GHG emissions in the country. The emission reduction potential of the agricultural sector (including land use change and forestry) is significant and not yet sufficiently explored in the country. Agriculture is highly vulnerable to weather variability. Sustainable water management and climate-sensitive insurance coverage for agricultural production can reduce some of the observed vulnerabilities in the country.

Source: World Bank Country Notes on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture. Accessed on: 24 May 2010 at http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/LACEXT/0,,contentMDK:...

For additional information refer to the World Bank Country Notes.

The Country Notes are a useful tool for organizing in a systematic way the available information on climate change and agriculture in each country. They provide a brief summary of information pertinent to both climate change and agriculture in 19 countries in LAC, with focus on policy developments (action plans and programs), institutional make-up, specific adaptation and mitigation strategies, as well as social aspects and insurance mechanisms to address risk in the sector.

Related Content

National Adaptation Plans in Ecuador

Through the “Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support for National Adaptation Plan in Ecuador” project, the Government of Ecuador is working to develop a National Adaptation Plan (NAP) to reduce vulnerability to the impacts of climate change, build adaptive capacity in prioritized sectors, and facilitate the coherent integration of climate change adaptation into development planning processes, policies and strategies related to food sovereignty, agriculture, aquaculture and fisheries; productive and strategic sectors; health; water patrimony; natural heritage; and human settlements.

The development of Ecuador’s NAP will follow the directives of the National Strategy for Climate Change (NSCC) and form an integral part of the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution to the Paris Agreement, as well as efforts to reach the goals outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

The project will contribute to increased resilience and enhanced livelihoods of the most vulnerable people, communities, and regions; increased resilience of health and well-being, and food and water security; increased resilience of infrastructure and the built environment to climate change threats; improved resilience of ecosystems and ecosystem services; strengthened institutional and regulatory systems for climate-responsive planning and development; increased generation and use of climate information in decision-making; strengthened adaptive capacity and reduced exposure to climate risks; and strengthened awareness of climate threats and risk-reduction processes.

Region/Country: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-79.584960937617 -2.1118256301711)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$3 million
Project Details: 

The project will be carried out for the four elements of the NAP process laid out by the UNFCCC technical guidelines, with special emphasis on elements A, B and C. The gaps in CCA integration into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels were identified during the inception workshop that took place in February 2017, and will be further addressed during the NAP process. The main gaps to integrating climate change adaptation into sectoral, territorial and local planning and budgeting are: a. lack of policies and technical standards to integrate CCA into development planning at sectoral and territorial scale; b. limited scale resolution of available climate projections and poor territorial coverage of vulnerability studies; c. insufficient information and limited capacities to perform climate risks analysis at sectoral and territorial level; d. limited capacities of the technical staff (public and private technical staff) to integrate CCA on development planning; and e. insufficient coordination between ministries and Decentralized Autonomous Governments (at different levels of governance) to implement CCA actions and integrate CCA into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local level.

GCF resources will enable the Government of Ecuador to contribute to the creation and strengthening of technical capacities (individual and institutional) to facilitate the integration of climate change adaptation into the central and local governments' development planning and budget processes. The resources will also enable the generation of climate information with better resolution and scale, as well as assessments of vulnerability and climate risks at sectoral, territorial and local levels. In addition, the funds will allow for the design of technical tools and instruments (guidelines, standards, strategies, etc.) to guide the integration of CCA into development planning and enable the dissemination of it progress and results. The funds will also allow the formulation of financing strategies / mechanisms for adaptation management at sectoral, territorial and local levels.

Objectives, outcomes and impact

The project will ultimately enable reducing vulnerabilities of communities and assets throughout Ecuador. By targeting processes of adaptation and development planning at both central and local levels, the project aims to strengthen planners and decision makers’ capacity to assess climate risks and vulnerability and to identify best suitable adaptation actions and investments to increase their resilience. The project aims particularly to build enabling conditions for integrating climate risk information in development planning through: (i) Improving the coverage and spatial and temporal resolution of climate projections, risk and vulnerability analyses; (ii) Strengthening institutional capacities through the development of guidance documents (standards, technical guidelines, etc.), regulations (at central and local levels), standardized methods and tools to facilitate managing climate risks; (iii) Providing training to key staff, partners and stakeholders (public and private) to facilitate the integration of CCA into development planning and budgeting processes at sectoral, territorial and local level; iii) Designing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) mechanisms for the NAP process and for the adaptation actions implemented by stakeholders; iv) Formulating strategies to ensure that financing, sustainability, scaling up and replication of CCA actions meet the surge in requirements during the NAP process.

The impacts of these activities will be far-reaching in creating the foundation for integrating climate risks in development planning through improved climate information, strengthened institutional and technical capacities, tools to identify and implement adaptation options and a financing strategy. It is expected that this would lead to an increased adaptive capacity and resilience and reduced vulnerability of human and natural systems. In addition, a few major current and planned national initiatives will be complemented, improved and strengthened through the NAP process, as is the case of: SENPLADES’s guidelines to incorporate the climate change dimension into development and land use plans; MAE’s guidelines to impulse the formulation of specific climate change plans at local level; and, CONGOPE’s planned project to generate useful technical documents for the design of climate change provincial strategies.

The NSCC and the proposed NAP are in line with the Constitution of Ecuador which outlines that the State would adopt measures to respond to climate change and protect the populations at risk, and are also aligned with the National Development Plan (NDP) of Ecuador which states the need to "Implement mitigation and adaptation to climate change to reduce the economic and environmental vulnerability."

Ecuador started the NAP process with an inception workshop hosted in February 2017 involving several key national institutions as well as agencies that have shown an interest in integrating climate change adaptation into the development planning process at sectoral and territorial levels.

Context

Ecuador is an Andean country in the Western Hemisphere, in the north-west of South America, with a total area of 257,217 km2 including the Galapagos Islands, and 16.3 million habitants as of 2015. The Southern Andes mountain range divides the continental territory of Ecuador into three different regions: Coast, Andes and Amazon. It is one of the 17 mega-diverse countries on the planet.

The National Participatory Planning System (NPPS) considers and incorporates climate change criteria in its structure, through the “top-level planning tools,” consisting of: Constitution of the Republic, National Development Plan (NDP), National Agenda for Productive Transformation, and National Strategy for Equality and Eradication of Poverty.

The Constitution of the Republic of Ecuador is a global pioneer in its acknowledgment of the rights of Nature, and establishing the State's obligation to reduce the vulnerability of people, communities and nature against the negative effects of natural or man-made disasters (including climate related). The NDP further states the specific requirement to "implement climate change mitigation and adaptation to reduce economic and environmental vulnerability".

The NPPS is complemented by secondary-level planning tools such as: Sectoral Policy and Institutional Planning (tools that provide, at government level, the strategic guidelines that have been identified and prioritized by the top-level planning tools); Zonal Planning Agendas (which articulate the national public policy according to the provisions of the National Territorial Strategy (NTS)); and Inter-sectoral Coordination Agendas (which manage cross-cutting issues such as environmental and risk management, and climate change). Meanwhile, various policies related to the management of climate change are contained in the National Climate Change Strategy.

Stakeholders

The key actors for the NAP process are the members of the Interinstitutional Climate Change Committee (ICCC), established in 2010 as the governmental organ for the coordination and integral execution of national policies related to climate change. The ICCC is led by the Ministry of Environment (MAE), through its Under-Secretariat for Climate Change. The ministry is also the National Focal Point for the UNFCCC, as well as the NDA for the GCF. Other key actors in the NAP process include various ministries, national secretariats, public research institutes, universities, Decentralized Autonomous Governments and their associated bodies, and civil society organizations, including women´s groups and indigenous populations, among others.

Ecuador began its NAP process in February 2017 with an Inception Workshop, which convened the main stakeholders involved in climate change adaptation management in the country. The workshop began a consultation- and interaction-oriented process, with the aim to compile useful information for the preparation of the initial proposal and subsequent activities. Participants to this workshop included representatives of nearly all ministries, local government representatives as well as specialized agencies (Meteorological institute), and civil society organizations.

The NAP process will include very extensive consultations at all levels to guarantee a participative and gender-balanced approach, ensuring the participation of indigenous populations, and prevent the buildup of adverse social implications. The NAP will make use of all existing mechanisms and bodies (e.g. citizen council sectors) to enable as wide a participation of all relevant actors as possible.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1 - National mandate, strategy and steering mechanisms are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed

This output will address three of the four steps of the element A of the NAP guidelines. Its main objectives are to support the institutionalization of the NAP process as well as to assess and address the technical and policy gaps that limit the integration of adaptation into development planning at the sectoral, territorial and local levels in the country. Recognition of barriers is further promoted through studies and inventories of the needs, weaknesses and gaps that hinder assessments of vulnerability and climate risk in the 6 prioritized sectors in Ecuador, as well as limitations and restrictions of available future climate information. Finally, communication and awareness strategies on the importance of climate change adaptation will be designed.

1.1 Establish a methodology and institutional coordination process for the development, implementation and review of NAP.

The NAP process has been initiated in the country through an Inception Workshop, but it is now necessary that this process be institutionalized. For that purpose, a common methodology needs to be agreed by the stakeholders outlining the main steps, tools and methods needed for steering, implementing, monitoring and evaluating the NAP. This methodology will be guiding the NAP development and implementation as well as possible future revision of the NAP with attention given to ways for financing the future exercises in an autonomous, sustainable manner.

The Inception Workshop also discussed the need for improved institutional coordination to integrate CCA into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels. Participants agreed that the Ministry of Environment (MAE) should lead the NAP process in its capacity of chair of the Interinstitutional Climate Change Committee (ICCC) and as the National Designated Authority of the Green Climate Fund, and the National Secretariat for Planning and Development (SENPLADES) should participate as main partner in the design and implementation of the NAP´s phases. While the ICCC provides a high-level coordination body for climate change policies on the country, there is a need to design coordination mechanisms at other levels to coordinate the development and implementation of NAP, including the creation of Sectoral Working Groups for the sectors prioritized by the NCCS, and to consider the inclusion of other stakeholders in addition to the government ministries and agencies.

This activity will be implemented as follows:

1.1.1 Design and establish through normative instruments (e.g. ministerial agreements) a specific and detailed methodology that guides the preparation and future revisions of the NAP, to be steered by the intra-institutional committee on Climate Change. This methodology will be developed through workshops, official consultations and other participatory and gender-balanced coordination mechanisms steered by the NDA’s office and will enable the institutionalization of the NAP process.

1.1.2 Establish institutional integration mechanisms for the coordination of the NAP, taking into account the structure and sectoral priorities established by the NSCC, and ensuring participation of all relevant stakeholders.  Priority will be given to the participation of women groups and indigenous people in consultation processes that will be carried out during NAP construction. Existing and other emerging mechanisms and bodies will be used (e.g., ICCC, Citizen Councils, Sectoral Working Groups related with the NAP process and other Working Groups that are being established for the National Determinate Contributions (NDC) construction phase).

1.2. Stocktake and assess gaps impeding adaptation planning, in climate information and analyses, technical capacity and skills at sectoral, territorial and local levels. In Ecuador, a limited degree of knowledge about the strengths, weaknesses and gaps in information, resources and tools necessary to facilitate, directly and indirectly, the integration of climate change adaptation into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels remains. Some relevant actors and principal sources of information that support the development of this activity have been identified in the Stocktaking Report. A thorough assessment and gap analysis of climate information as well as capacity needs assessment are needed to enable identify adequate measures to palliate these gaps.

This activity will be implemented as follows:

1.2.1 Perform a comprehensive inventory with a proper analysis of the shortcomings and gaps of the social, economic and environmental information necessary for preparing assessments of vulnerability and climate risk in the 6 prioritized sectors established by NCCS: i) food sovereignty, agriculture, aquaculture and fisheries; ii) productive and strategic sectors; iii) health; iv) water patrimony; v) natural heritage; and vi) human settlements. The inventory will be complemented with an assessment of available climate studies with focus on: a) a comparative study of their respective potentials to be used as inputs in the modeling of climate change impacts at the sectoral, territorial and local levels (useful in climate risk analysis); and b) a technical document with recommendations on complementary climate studies required.

1.2.2 Compile relevant experiences (from past and ongoing initiatives) of CCA actions in the six prioritized sectors that have been integrated (directly or indirectly) by ministries or GADs (sub-national governments) in development planning at territorial or local level. Additionally, complement these with information about other experiences relevant to CCA management in Ecuador (e.g. PRAA, PACC, REDD+ and other projects). This exercise will particularly attempt to synthesize lessons learned and best practices related to the private sector participation as well the incorporation of gender considerations and the effective participation of indigenous people in developed adaptive and/or consultation processes could be identified.

1.2.3 Analyze strengths, weaknesses (including technical skills) and resources needed to integrate climate change adaptation into current and in future processes of development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels (defined by NDP and oriented by SENPLADES through technical guidelines) as well as in policies, programs and projects of the six prioritized sectors, including planned private sector initiatives.

1.2.4 Design a proposal to strengthen and update the technical capacities of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology with the aim to generate better climate data and relevant studies of climate change. The proposal will include a focus on training, equipment, and improvements in the processes of gathering and processing information.

1.3 .Design strategies for communication, awareness-raising and training for key actors linked to the integration of climate change adaptation into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels.

The success of the NAP depends on having informed and committed stakeholders, partners and direct / indirect beneficiaries of the project that are conscious of the importance of integrating adaptation into the development planning process and its expected results (reducing vulnerability and increasing resilience at sectoral, territorial and local levels). This activity will focus on designing and implementing strategies for communication, awareness raising and capacity building for public and private planners and decision makers and other key actors related to the NAP process, including private sector. These strategies will be developed by consultants. It is expected that the information generated in activity 1.2 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

1.3.1 Develop and implement a communication and awareness-raising Strategy for relevant partners (i.e. technical and political focal points of ministries of the six prioritized sectors) and other key stakeholders (civil society delegates, local professional associations, private-sector staff, NGO personnel, academics and researchers, local governments, indigenous communities, private producer associations, women groups, etc.) linked to the NAP. This strategy will be constructed through a participative and gender sensitive process oriented to emphasize the importance of integrating CCA into development planning as an effective instrument to increase resilience; as well as to institutionalize the NAP process in the country.

1.3.2 Design and implement a training programme to strengthen the skills of technical staff (at least 100 public and private Technical staff) related to the integration of adaptation into development planning processes at the sectoral, territorial and local levels. This programme will be developed building upon the results of input 1.2.3 and in sets of workshops with national coverage, ensuring gender balance and participation of indigenous populations, and will also be part of the NAP institutionalization process.

Output 2 - Preparatory elements for the NAP are in place to develop a knowledge base and formulate the NAP

This output will address the five steps of the element B of a NAP. Its main objective is to establish a solid base of information and knowledge that will adequately inform decision-making and facilitate the integration of adaptation into development planning at the sectoral, territorial and local levels in Ecuador. The optimization of climate forecasts will enable undertaking thorough climate vulnerability and risk assessment (including the assessment of impacts and generation of adaptive responses). Also, this output will address the identification, prioritization and valuation of adaptation actions and the development of guidelines for the integration of adaptation into development planning processes that will complement and improve existing sectoral and territorial guidelines (emitted by SENPLADES) and established technical procedures to work in CCA at local level (emitted by MAE). Finally, the NAP formulation and the design of the respective dissemination tools are also planned as part of this output.

2.1. Generate technical documents and additional climate studies for Ecuador.

Currently, in Ecuador there are multiple climate studies and future climate projections, but these fail to satisfy end-user requirements, because of their limited resolution and scale. There are climate projections useful for the medium and long term (the next 15 years, and until the end of the century) as well as statistical climate analyses that allow climate projections for the short and medium term (between 5 and 10 years into the future). The cell size has a low resolution (more than 100x100 km). In a cell of this size there are multiple topographic and land use conditions, and such a resolution is not granular enough to facilitate more accurate analysis and inform decision making at local level. For these reasons, it is essential to improve the available studies through downscaling techniques (dynamical or statistical downscaling) and use of observed weather data from additional meteorological stations.

These additional climate studies and technical documents will be developed by consultants. It is expected that the available climate projections and other available climate studies will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

2.1.1 Analyze available climate indices (related to extreme meteorological events) and climate trends (related to climate variability and change) to make short- and medium-term climate forecasts, useful for a precise identification of short- and medium-term climate impacts at sectoral, territorial and local levels, which would in turn allow the definition of climate change adaptation actions to be included in the NAP.

2.1.2 Develop and apply a technical methodology for prioritization of specific zones (one specific geographical zone for each prioritized sector) based on sectoral needs, socio-economic scenarios and the information generated through the activities of output 1, activity 1.2. These prioritized zones will be useful for preparing studies of regionalization of climate projections (ref. 2.1.3) that provide key information to make long-term climate “forecasts” for the subsequent identification and prioritization of long-term climate impacts at sectoral, territorial and local levels.

2.1.3 Generate six downscaled climate projections (one foreach prioritized sector) based on input 2.1.2, that allow the identification and categorization of climate hazards for each sector and the subsequent identification and prioritization of the respective CCA actions.

2.2 Perform vulnerability and climate risk studies at territorial and sectoral scales, including the assessment of impacts and generation of adaptive responses.

The vulnerability analyses available for Ecuador have been developed using different methodologies and approaches, which in many cases are not comparable. In addition, these analyses are not officially recognized because they do not have national coverage (in most cases they have local coverage: at the level of a watershed or canton or parish, or exceptionally at the provincial level).

On the other hand, the approach given by the IPCC in its Fifth Report in 2014 is still little known or used, which is why climate risk assessments are still at an early stage in the country. Undoubtedly, information about vulnerability and climate risk is a key input for decision-making in the development planning processes of ministries and GADs. These vulnerability and climate risk studies will be developed by consultants. It is expected the information generated in activity 2.1 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

2.2.1 Produce six sectoral Vulnerability and Climate Risk studies (one for each prioritized sector) including assessments of climate change impacts in the medium and long terms, using software models. These will be based on the information generated by inputs 2.1.2 and 2.1.3. Additionally, these studies will include the formulation of sets of CCA options (at the sectoral level) that will be integrated in the NAP document. In all cases, these studies will be carried out with the support of Sectoral Working Groups (with the roles of feedback and approval) making sure to include gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations into formulated actions. The studies will include assessing climate risks and impacts on vulnerable groups (e.g. women and indigenous peoples’) as well as some of their major livelihoods and economic activities.

2.2.2 Generate one territorial Vulnerability and Climate Risk study with local level granularity and with national coverage that includes an assessment of short- and medium-term impacts of climate threats. This study will use the information generated by input 2.1.1 and will establish adaptation actions typologies and CCA action profiles at territorial and local levels (at least 10 actions) to be included in the NAP. These typologies and adaptation action profiles will be developed with inputs from and consultation with relevant local stakeholders (key informants, private sector delegates and other relevant actors) and Sectoral Working Groups, making sure to include gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations into the formulated actions.

2.3 Develop valuation studies of climate change adaptation options.

Ecuador has not fully developed yet experience of determining the costs of CCA, and no standardized methodologies. It is essential to have accurate and reliable information about the costs of implementing prioritized adaptation actions as part of the activities of the NAP process, so that strategies and funding mechanisms can be designed appropriately. Such evaluation studies will be developed by consultants. It is expected that the information generated in activities 2.2 and 3.1 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

2.3.1 Prioritize, appraise and evaluate CCA options emanating from inputs 2.2.1 and 2.2.2 (to be selected and prioritized applying the criteria developed in input 3.1.1), considering the following aspects: i) cost analysis of non-adaptive options; ii) cost analysis of the social, economic and environmental benefits of adaptation; iii) cost analysis of adaptation actions to be implemented (selected in consideration of CCA actions identified in inputs 2.2.1 and 2.2.2 and applying the prioritization criteria indicated in point 3.1.1); and iv) gender. In all cases, these analyses will be carried out with the support of Sectoral Working Groups (with the roles of feedback and approval) making sure to include gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations.

2.4 Formulate and communicate an overarching NAP document that takes into account Sectoral and Sub-National considerations

Since the publication of the NSCC in 2012, there has been no other official instrument to guide public policy related to CCA management in Ecuador. In addition, the guidelines issued by MAE in 2014 (Ministerial Agreement N° 137) only address the integration of adaptation into local development planning. Therefore, the formulation of the NAP and the subsequent dissemination of its results and progress constitute a unique opportunity to have specific public policy instruments that facilitate the integration of adaptation into development planning at the sectoral, territorial and local levels. The availability of the NAP constitutes a fundamental contribution to its institutionalization process.

A draft NAP will be developed building on the results of activities 2.1,2.2, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.4 and 5.2. In addition, the NAP will be finalised after a process of consultation involving sectoral and local stakeholders, including women’s groups, community‐based organizations, environmental and social non‐governmental organizations as well as the private sector. The consultation process will be defined in detail during activity 1.1.1 that sets out the methodology for the NAP. Following the consultation, the comments received will be compiled and integrated into the final NAP. This activity will be implemented as follows:

2.4.1 Formulate a draft National Adaptation Plan, structured as follows: i) diagnostics drawn from the studies/analysis of output 1; ii) climatic and vulnerability baseline Scenario drawn from activities 2.1 and 2.2; iii) prioritized adaptation options based on activities2.2 and 2.3; iv)NAP building process that includes the identification of key stakeholders, beneficiaries, responsible, deadlines, budgets, funding, etc.; v) implementation arrangements drawn from activity 3.2; vi) enabling instruments for the NAP process based on activities 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3; vii) implementation strategy drawn from activity 3.4; viii) NAP MRV system and dissemination strategy drawn from activities 4.1 and 4.2; and, ix) funding strategy drawn from activity 5.1.

2.4.2 Undertake a participatory process involving sectoral and local stakeholders, including women’s groups, community‐based organizations, environmental and social non‐governmental organizations as well as the private sector to validate the draft NAP. This process will include very extensive consultations to guarantee a participative and gender-balanced approach, ensure the participation of private sector and indigenous populations, and prevent the build-up of adverse social and environmental implications.

2.4.3 Compile and finalise the NAP integrating review comments. The final NAP document will be included as the main input for the adaptation chapter in the Fourth National Communication expected to start in 2018.

2.5. Prepare guidelines for the vertical integration of CCA into development planning at the territorial and local scales.

The Explanatory Guide (MAE, 2014) provides guidelines for the preparation of local plans for climate change and for the effective incorporation of the climate change dimension into updating the development and land use plans of the GADS (additional to those published on this topic by SENPLADES in 2011 and 2014). These tools have produced satisfactory, if limited results, but it is clear that much more targeted instruments are needed. Therefore, it is essential to strengthen the integration of CCA into development planning at the sectoral, territorial and local levels, with new and improved technical guidelines and/or regulations. Undoubtedly, these guidelines will constitute a key element in the integration of adaptation in development planning processes under the responsibility of sectoral ministries and the GADs.

These guidelines to integrate CCA into development planning will be developed under this activity. It is expected that the information generated in activities 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

2.5.1 Develop three technical guidelines and/or regulations to integrate climate change adaptation into development planning (one guideline for each level: sectoral, territorial and local). These instruments will be developed in inter-institutional articulation procedures between MAE, SENPLADES and the respective Sectoral Working Groups of the six prioritized sectors, with the final purpose of facilitating the integration of CCA in subnational development planning processes. This activity will complement other CCA current initiatives such as that undertaken by SENPLADES to incorporate the climate change dimension into development and land use plans, and the one initiated by MAE to impulse the formulation of specific climate change plans at local scale.

Output 3.NAP implementation is facilitated.

This output will address the four steps of element C of the NAP. Its main objective is to contribute to the building of conditions necessary for the implementation of the NAP process in the country, and to promote, complement and improve the availability of tools and key instruments for the facilitation of the integration of CCA into development planning gat the sectoral, territorial and local levels (e.g., CONGOPE’s planned initiative financed by European Union to generate useful technical documents for the design and implementation of provincial climate change strategies). For these reasons, it is necessary to develop a strategy for the implementation of adaptation actions, generating technical standards that will be useful for the planning and implementation of programs and projects related to the six sectors prioritized by the NCCS, and preparing a proposal for joint actions with similar initiatives at regional or supranational levels.

3.1 Define criteria for the prioritization of CCA actions.

Despite the many experiences in the design and implementation of projects and initiatives for CCA that exist in Ecuador, no standardized criteria have been developed to prioritize adaptation actions. Through various past and ongoing initiatives, various types of prioritization criteria have been tested (using different methodologies), but all of them only on an experimental basis. For this reason, it is essential to develop, in a standardized way, criteria that allow the prioritization of adaptation actions across the country.

The criteria will be developed by experts using the results of input2.3.1 with the sets of CCA options identifiedfrominputs2.2.1 and 2.2.2. It is expected that the criteria will be useful in other adaptation initiatives at sectoral, territorial and local levels; and it will be used as an official instrument of the MAE (through ministerial agreement or another other regulation) for future processes as well. It is expected that the information generated in activity 2.3 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

3.1.1 Develop a list of prioritization criteria for CCA options (including multi criteria tools with a strong emphasis on gender). The prioritization criteria will be carried out with the support of the Sectoral Working Groups (with the roles of feedback and approval), ensuring that it includes gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations, as well the private sector engagement to participate in the implementation of CCA actions.

3.2 Elaborate an implementation strategy of adaptation actions, joint actions with others ongoing adaptive initiatives (at national and international scale) and sustainability of the adaptation processes being promoted.

Many actors in Ecuador, must assume responsibility for the integration of CCA into development planning at the sectoral, territorial and local levels, per their institutional functions. Similarly, other relevant actors, especially in the private sector, have participated in implementing adaptation initiatives that sometimes have been managed in isolation. For these reasons, it is necessary to develop a strategy that will enable a coordinated and synergistic action between different institutions in the public and private sector. It is expected that the information generated in activities 1.1 and 2.3 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

3.2.1 Develop an implementation strategy to carry out the prioritized adaptation options (prioritized through input 2.3.1) and for identifying synergies (at national and sub-national levels) that complement and provide sustainability to the NAP process. The strategy will be developed in coordination with sectoral ministries and other relevant stakeholders (through specific inter-ministerial/institutional arrangements defined through activity 1.1) by planned participation and discussion spaces (such as those that will be constituted for the Sectoral Working Groups, as mentioned in input 1.1.1 and section 6 of this proposal). This strategy also aims to incorporate the adaptation dimension into other planned sectoral actions which will increase the expected impact of the NAP because sectoral budgets will be added for the design and implementation phases of CCA selected options.

3.3. Generate technical documents for the horizontal integration of climate change adaptation into development planning at the sectoral levels.

Currently there are still very few usable technical standards in Ecuador that specifically relate climate change adaptation with the different phases of the project cycle. There are neither sufficient complementary normative instruments, nor technical documents that allow, for example, sufficient climate change adaptation-related information for adequate planning, design and execution of programs and projects of the six prioritized sectors. The availability of these technical documents (standards and instruments) would constitute a fundamental contribution to the integration of adaptation into the development planning process. These technical documents will be developed by consultants. It is expected that the information generated in activity 2.2 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

3.3.1 Generate six technical standards relevant to the six prioritized sectors to integrate climate change adaptation into development planning processes at the sectoral level. These technical standards will provide technical data, recommendations and other inputs useful for the design and implementation of sectoral programmes and projects, and they will be developed in a participative manner with the support of the Sectoral Working Groups (with the roles of feedback and approval), ensuring the inclusion of gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations.

3.3.2 Develop two technical guidance documents on: i) adaptation options’ typologies; and ii) relevant aspects of CCA options design. These instruments will provide theoretical definitions, practical recommendations and examples for the main adaptation actions typologies (different kinds of CCA actions in each prioritized sector) and key aspects of their design (i.e. engineering adaptive solutions against the potential impacts of seasonal flow variations on the infrastructure or the operations of projects in the water sector). These documents will be used by technical staff, academics, consultants and other people connected to the phases of design and implementation of CCA options at sectoral, territorial and local levels, and they will be developed with the support of the Sectoral Working Groups (with the roles of feedback and approval), ensuring the inclusion of gender and indigenous peoples’ considerations. This activity will complement other planned CCA initiatives, such as the one that will be undertaken by CONGOPE to generate useful technical documents for the design of climate change provincial strategies, and will provide specific inputs for other relevant initiatives at sectoral level like the NDC formulation and implementation process.

3.4. Identify synergies with other plans, projects and initiatives of climate change adaptation at regional level.

In recent years, several actions or joint projects for climate change adaptation have been undertaken in the Andean region.

Most of these have been isolated cases and mostly with of a pilot or demonstration nature (e.g. the PRAA project). Undoubtedly, the development of the NAP process opens the way for synergistic / coordinated action with parallel initiatives in neighbouring countries (countries of the Andean region and/or South America), as well as other adaptive initiatives that are already in development. For this reason, it is essential to generate a proposal of synergies that permits the optimization of the use of the funds and better results in adaptation processes. This proposal will be developed by consultants. It is expected that the information generated in most of activities of outputs 2 and 3 will be used as a relevant input for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

3.4.1 Identify synergies with other plans, projects and initiatives of climate change adaptation at regional level (e.g., the Andean region and / or South America), including the drafting of Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) for interaction, exchange and transfer of information/knowledge and technology, etc. The agreements would be signed between the ministries of Ecuador and their counterparts in neighboring countries or with other competent authorities, as appropriate. Regional agreements will facilitate the development of binational/regional proposals that seek funding for joint CCA actions at the sectoral level.

Output 4. Mechanisms for reporting, monitoring and review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place. This output will address two of the four steps of the element D of an NAP. Its main objective is to build a mechanism that systematically allows the monitoring of the NAP process as well as the evaluation and dissemination of its progress and results. Undoubtedly, the use of indicators will allow a strong and appropriate evaluation mechanism of the progress and results of NAP process.

4.1 Design an MRV system for the NAP process effectiveness, based on indicators.

In Ecuador, the use of indicators to assess CCA actions and initiatives is still a pending task, because only experimental experiences or pilot projects are available. The measurement of the effectiveness of adaptation actions goes beyond the verification of their degree of compliance. A planned action must not only be executed according to the agreed timeframe and outputs, but also achieve the expected results. An MRV system will contribute significantly to the success of the NAP, and the integration of adaptation measures into the development planning processes.

This activity will be implemented as follows:

4.1.1 Develop indicators and a system of measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of the national adaptation plan effectiveness, to measure: i) the level of integration of adaptation into the development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels; ii) the increased resilience and / or the reduced vulnerability at the sectoral, territorial and local levels; and iii) gender& indigenous peoples’ mainstreaming. This system will include a strategy for collecting data that will feed into the indicators.

4.2Generate periodic reports on progress and results of the NAP process.

The dissemination of the results generated by an MRV system ensures improvements in the public and private management of CCA, and in particular will significantly support the integration of adaptation into development planning at sectoral, territorial and local levels. Also, it is important that this kind of information be available because it constitutes a relevant input to the next National Communication on Climate Change.

These reports will be developed by the NAP team. All information related to the NAP process, as well as information from the MRV system (according to point 4.1.1), will be key inputs for the Fourth National Communication on Climate Change expected to start in 2018 (and subsequent National Communications). It is expected that the system implemented in activity 4.1 will be used as a relevant instrument for this activity, which will be implemented as follows:

4.2.1Prepare and disseminate annual reports (technical documents) on the progress and results of the NAP process.

Output 5. Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available.

The main objective of this output is to support the generation of specialized information and a detailed strategy that provides concrete possibilities to ensure the financing and sustainability of the NAP process. Key instruments must be developed to help stakeholders mobilize the funding necessary for the integration of CCA into development planning, as well as for the implementation of prioritized CCA actions, including effective options for the private sector investments. For these reasons, it is very important to generate this specialized strategy as an instrument that allows the NAP process.

5.1 Define and design a funding and sustainability strategy of the NAP process (Including scaling and replication options).

In Ecuador, there have been only a few experiences of formulation of strategies for financing CCA at sectoral, territorial or local level. Equally, the theme of sustainability of adaptive actions and processes has usually come up against the absence of long-term resources. To overcome this limitation, it is planned to design a sustainability strategy to ensure ongoing and future adaptation initiatives. This activity will be implemented as follows:

5.1.1 Develop a financing and sustainability strategy for the NAP process (including options for scaling and replication) which quantifies the cost of adaptation options included in the NAP, and the identification of elements from the public and private sector, international cooperation, multilateral agencies, etc., who could co-finance adaptation activities in Ecuador. This strategy will include a detailed analysis of the alternatives and mechanisms to promote investments from the financial stakeholders, Also, this strategy will include a specific section of economic resources mobilisation options for private sector investments and the identification of coordinated and integrated measures and incentives to create a supportive and enabling environment for adaptation-related private investment, all of it with the final purpose to ensure the engagement of this sector. In addition, the Ecuadorian legal framework of Public & Private Alliances is expected to be applicate.

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1 - National mandate, strategy and steering mechanisms are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed

Output 2 - Preparatory elements for the NAP are in place to develop a knowledge base and formulate the NAP

Output 3 - NAP implementation is facilitated

Output 4 - Mechanisms for reporting, monitoring and review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place

Output 5 - Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available.

Ecuador NAMA

Under the Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme, financed by the EU, Germany, and AusAID, participating countries are primarily focusing on capacity building activities at the national level.  This includes formulating Low-Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) and/or Nationally appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), as well as establishing the underlying data collection systems (i.e. national GHG inventory systems, and monitoring, reporting and verification systems).

Nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) are concrete projects, policies, and/or programmes that shift a technology or sector in a country onto a low-carbon development trajectory.  A LEDS, on the other hand, outlines the intended overall economic, energy, and emissions trajectory for a country and helps to identify entry points for policy intervention (including identifying and prioritizing NAMAs and ensuring coherence between NAMAs and national development goals).

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-78.684078976978 -0.16992476957848)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
The four-year Low Emission Capacity Building Programme is being implemented with €8,000,000 of funding from the European Union and €5,000,000 from the Federal Republic of Germany.
Project Details: 

Supporting Mitigation Actions

As a country driven process, each country determines, develops and executes its own project with a clear focus on one of the two areas. From the inception phase of each project, however, and for the life of the project, countries will receive guidance and support from UNDP. Guidance and technical backstopping for all national-level projects will be coordinated, delivered and supported through an over-arching component of the programme: the Global Support Unit.

Programme-supported projects fall into one of several categories:

  • Identifying opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) and designing low emission development strategies (LEDS) in context of national priorities
  • Design ofsystems for measuring, reporting, and verification (MRV) of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme promotes essential cooperation between relevant institutions, engaging the public sector and industry in a concerted effort to address climate change consistent with national development priorities around the world.

The overall objectives are to strengthen capacities in participating countries in the following ways:

  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • Identify opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMA);
  • Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities
  • Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verification of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) should be an essential component of any LEDS, NAMAs, or Mitigation Action Plans (MAPs) prepared by developing countries – particularly if a developing country is seeking external financial, technical or capacity-building support, and will therefore be subject to international MRV as described in the Cancun Accords. However, MRV needs will differ depending on whether a country is undertaking a REDD+ type NAMA, for example, versus improving an urban mass transit system. (It is worth noting that the international political arena also refers to the MRV of public finance; this is not being addressed under this project.)

Methodological approach

New methodologies are being developed by different organizations for the development and adoption of MRVs. Although there are still no adopted guidelines on MRV, we can assume that there will be some overarching principles of good practice, such as using the GHG estimation and reporting processes described in the IPCC guidance materials for GHG inventories.

Institutional and political context

As with the GHG national inventory system, it will be important to raise awareness of all key stakeholders on the necessity for MRV to ensure full engagement. It may be useful to consider developing a strategy to engage key providers of data and ensure they are adequately trained.

Linkages to other relevant initiatives

Clearly, the work undertaken under this component has a direct linkage to the National Communications process. Some countries may also be undertaking GHG inventories at the sub-national level and will need to consider how to incorporate this work, as appropriate. Indicators being used in mitigation projects financed by the GEF or other sources may also provide insights for the MRV strategy for NAMAs, LEDS, and/or MAPs.

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Funding Source Short Code: 
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Project Status: 

Ecuador Request for CEO Endorsement (April 2007)

Project Title: Adaptation to Climate Change through Effective Water Governance in Ecuador

UNDP-ALM Ecuador Case Study (December 2010)

Abstract: Ecuador is well known for its beautiful and rugged topography and has an extreme diversity of climates that range from high altitude glaciers to tropical rain forests in the Amazon and dry tropical forest on the Pacific Coast. Some of these areas show a greater sensitivity to climate change, or will undergo rapid changes as a result of climate change. Water is a defining factor in this process. In Ecuador melting glaciers and irregular rainfall have already begun affecting available power, agricultural production and drinking-water supplies.

UNDP Ecuador Project Document (April 2007)

The project objective is to reduce Ecuador's vulnerability to climate change through effective water resource management. The project will mainstream climate change adaptation into water management practices in Ecuador through the integration of climate change risk of the water sector into key national and local development plans, the implementation of adaptation measures, and information management and knowledge brokering. The Project Document, from April 2007, gives detailed information on the Ecuador project.

Ecuador Executive Summary (April 2007)

Request for: Council Work Program Inclusion Under the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF)

Adaptation to Climate Change through Effective Water Governance in Ecuador

Ecuador is well known for its beautiful and rugged topography and has an extreme diversity of climates that range from high altitude glaciers to tropical rain forests in the Amazon and dry tropical forest on the Pacific Coast. Some of these areas show a greater sensitivity to climate change, or will undergo rapid changes as a result of climate change. Water is a defining factor in this process. In Ecuador melting glaciers and irregular rainfall have already begun affecting available power, agricultural production and drinking-water supplies.

Addressing these problems, the "Adapting to Climate Change through Effective Water Governance in Ecuador" project aims to increase the adaptive capacities of water resource management in the agriculture and the energy sector through sound water governance arrangements, information management and flexible financial mechanisms to promote local innovation towards sustainable water management. The project’s overall goal is to reduce Ecuador’s vulnerability to climate change and increase resilience through improved access to timely and accurate climate data. The project will mainstream climate change adaptation into water management practices in Ecuador through the integration of climate change risk of the water sector into key national and local development plans, the implementation of adaptation measures, and information management and knowledge brokering.

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-79.5574829001 -1.50497829844)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural Ecuadorians facing potential water shortages resulting from climate change and from diminishing supplies due to weak infrastructure.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
3,000,000 (as of June 30, 2009)
Co-Financing Total: 
16,080,000 (as of June 30, 2009)
Project Details: 

Given its geographical location and rugged topography, Ecuador is a highly vulnerable country to impacts of climate change (UNFCCC First National Communication, Quito, 2000). Periodic El Niño events, particularly those of 1982-83 and 1997-98, have demonstrated the catastrophic effects of climate variability in the country. This high degree of exposure, combined with the vulnerability of key economic sectors such as agriculture, health, energy, water resources, coastal resources, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism, reinforces the notion that Ecuador is a country particularly vulnerable to climate change.

Characterized by extreme diversity of climate zones, Ecuador boasts an extraordinary array of geographical systems that range from high altitude glaciers to tropical rain forests in the Amazon upper tributaries to dry tropical forest on the Pacific Coast, as well as an insular outpost in the Pacific with the Galapagos Islands, a World Heritage Site. Some of these systems show a greater sensitivity to climate change, or at least are considered most likely to undergo rapid changes as a result of climate change, including variability. As highlighted in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Summary Report, such ecosystems provide a range of environmental services that are critical to rural livelihoods and urban welfare. As these systems deteriorate due to various direct and indirect factors, including climate change, the quality of environmental goods and services also decreases.

The UNDP country programme (CPO/CPD) in Ecuador (2004-2008) supports the new government’s efforts to reinforce citizen participation and democratic dialogue, combat corruption, reduce poverty and exclusion, and reactivate the economy to create jobs and wealth, as well as improve the environmental security. The natural endowment of Ecuador is summarized in an important natural resource base, an extremely diverse environment, rich and diversified culture and traditions, favourable climatic conditions and a potential access to world markets. This contrasts with the cycle of exclusion and inequality, forcing a majority of Ecuadorians into poverty. UNDP is assisting Ecuador combat poverty by strengthening social protection networks and technical and other resource support for expanding livelihood opportunities

Given high vulnerability to natural disasters, Ecuador needs to implement anticipatory measures  in order to avoid recurrent costly climate induced hazards. Populations with limited resources are the most vulnerable to natural phenomena in terms of exposure to the risk of losing assets. The impact on infrastructure is another serious concern. By working with government institutions at the local and central levels, it is possible to contribute to the implementation of a range of risk reduction measures. UNDP will work closely with international financial institutions as well as with other United Nations Agencies and national authorities to support both the prevention and responses to natural disasters. The United Nations system contingency plan and the United Nations Emergency Team for Ecuador represent an invaluable asset to be utilized in this regard.

The country programme of UN agencies in Ecuador is articulated around three UNDAF objectives: (i) poverty reduction through improved access to basic social services and employment; (ii) democratic governance and transparency through strengthening of government institutions and decentralization process; and (iii) sustainable environment through equitable access to natural resources. The proposed project, which aims to address climate change risks confronting the water sector, will contribute directly to outcomes under two of these objectives: UNDAF objective 1: poverty reduction through access to quality basic social services and productive activities:

  • Public awareness and policy dialogue on sustainable human development. This project willcontribute through promoting awareness on climate change risks on water resources and therefore on livelihood opportunities. It will contribute to the policy dialogue on sustainable human development by focusing on climate change issues relevant to human development.
  • Capacity of and partnership between local authorities and civil society organizations. This project will contribute by focusing on developing partnerships between government, the private sector and civil society to manage climate change risks.
  • Access to basic social services and systems for risk management. The project will contribute through establishing information systems that can support climate change risk management strategies.
  • Capacity development to manage and reduce risk of natural disasters. This project will contribute by focusing on capacity development of key stakeholders to manage climate change risks. UNDAF objective 2: environmentally sustainable development to reduce poverty
  • National policy, legal and regulatory framework for environmentally sustainable development. The project’s focus on policy instruments to manage climate change risks will promote environmentally sustainable development.
  • Institutional framework for sustainable environmental management and energy development. The development of institutional structures to better manage climate change risks will be animportant contribution to sustainable environmental management.

This project aims to address climate change risks in the water sector. The project will mainstream climate change adaptation into water management practices in Ecuador through the integration of climate change risk of the water sector into key national and local development plans, the implementation of adaptation measures, and information management and knowledge sharing.

The project is designed to address a range of considerations that are a priority for improved management of climate risks. For one, the project will integrate climate change concerns into planning and policy formulation processes for water resources, including day-to-day practices of planners and other stakeholders (i.e. a “top-down” approach). The project will also train local and regional water resources managers in government agencies, grassroots organizations and NGOs on innovative approaches to mainstream climate change adaptation to water management practices (i.e. a “bottom-up” approach).

The project focuses on interventions at the national and local levels. At the national level, the project will improve water governance by incorporating climate risks consideration into water management and decision making processes. At the local level, interventions will be in specific provinces that have been identified based on climate change vulnerability assessments and stakeholder consultations. These provinces which host key watersheds have shown a political willingness to implement adaptation measures to climate change to improve the governance and management of water resources in the face of climate change with the participation of provincial authorities and local communities. The provinces where pilot measures will be implemented include Los Rios, Manabi, Loja and Azuay

Source: UNDP SCCF Ecuador Project Document 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Climate change risk on the water sector integrated into key relevant plans and programs
    • Output 1.1: Practical guidance on the integration of climate risks into relevant water management plans and programmes developed
    • Output 1.2: Relevant plans and programmes incorporate climate risks in the water sector
  • Outcome 2: Strategies and measures that will facilitate adaptation to climate change impacts on water resources implemented at the local level
    • Output 2.1: Measures, technologies and practices to improve the adaptive capacity of water resources management introduced and implemented in pilot systems.
    • Output 2.2: Information management systems reflecting climate change impacts on the water sector developed
  • Outcome 3: Institutional and human capacity strengthened, and information/lessons learned disseminated
  • Output 3.1: Improved institutional and technical capacities to support the mainstreaming of climate risks and implementation of adaptation measures in the water sector
  • Output 3.2: Knowledge and lessons learned to support implementation of adaptation measures compiled and disseminated
  • Output 3.3: Guidance documents for GEF and MoE on climate change adaptation programming in the water resource sector provided

Source: UNDP SCCF Ecuador Project Document 

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits: UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Establish a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP SCCF Ecuador Project Document 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Gabriel Jaramillo
Country Officer
Ernesto Martínez
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: