Climate Change Adaptation in the News

January 2018

January 2018

Fishermen turn mangrove protectors, successfully farm crabs in estuaries

Your Story

Tuesday 16 January 2018

Coastal communities in Maharashtra’s Sindhudurg district are earning supplementary incomes by farming crabs with help from the state government and development agencies... Using this awareness, the UNDP Global Environmental Finance initiated a four-year-long mangrove crab farming plan in 2011 in 17 villages of Sindhudurg district, spread across 28.5 acres, to encourage local people to conserve mangroves.

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A UNDP effort aims to marry conservation, livelihood in Sindhudurg

Hindustan Times

Monday 15 January 2018

Around 8am every day, nine women aged 27 to 55 clamber onto two boats and head to the Mandvi creek in Vengurla, Sindhudurg. The area is home to 45 otters, spread across two dens. The two groups take tourists along a 300-metre stretch on one-hour boat rides, talking to them not just about the marine life but also about the mangroves they depend on. As the tour proceeds, the women use pointed sticks to clear garbage from the mangrove roots. These women are part of the Swamini Mahila Bachat Gat, constituted as one of 60 projects in the district that aim to tackle the garbage issue threatening the biodiversity of Sindhudurg’s creeks. “We have been trained to speak in English and Hindi. We received hospitality training and also learnt about different mangrove species, when they flower, their medicinal benefits etc,” said Shweta Hule. “We know how trash coming from cities within the district through the creek chokes the breathing roots of these mangrove trees, and why it is essential to remove it and protect this area.” The 60 programmes are livelihood schemes framed by the state mangrove cell in association with the UNDP-GEF (United Nations Development Programme - Global Environment Facility) Project between 2012 and 2016, based on a study of the coastal ecosystem and the threats it faces. Sindhudurg accounts for 3% of Maharashtra’s total mangrove cover but houses more of its coastal biodiversity that any other district in the state.

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Le PNUD met en place un système de base de données commune pour la zone maritime de gestion Maurice-Seychelles

FrenchChina.org

Monday 15 January 2018

Le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) a signé jeudi un accord pour mettre en place un système de base de données commune qui facilitera la gestion de la zone maritime Maurice-Seychelles, a indiqué jeudi le Bureau du Premier ministre mauricien dans un communiqué. Ce projet contribuera aux travaux de planification spatiale marine de la Commission mixte et permettra aux deux pays de mieux communiquer et échanger des données dans la zone conjointe. En décembre 2008, Maurice et les Seychelles, parties à la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer, ont présenté conjointement à la Commission des limites du plateau continental des Nations Unies (CLPC) un plateau continental étendu au-delà des limites des zones économiques exclusives du plateau des Mascareignes. La zone comprend une vaste étendue de fond marin et un sous-sol marin sous-jacent d'environ 396.000 km². La CLPC a nommé une sous-commission qui a examiné le dossier en 2009. Après de longues délibérations, la CLPC a formulé ses recommandations en mars 2011, conférant à Maurice et aux Seychelles la compétence conjointe sur cette zone commune. Cette zone se situe au-delà des zones économiques exclusives des deux pays, ce qui ouvre la porte à de nouvelles opportunités de coopération entre les deux pays, notamment en matière de ressources pétrolières et gazières, de gisements minéraux et d'organismes marins vivants.

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Aide du PNUD aux initiatives locales

Republic of Togo

Monday 15 January 2018

Le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) a accordé vendredi un appui de près de 100 millions de Fcfa a quatre ONG et à deux comités villageois qui favorisent la préservation de l’environnement. Un financement issu du Fonds pour l’environnement mondial (FEM). Les projets concernent la protection des écosystèmes des montagnes, la conservation des forêts communautaires, la lutte contre la dégradation des terres, la promotion de l’écotourisme, la collecte et le recyclage des déchets plastiques et la bonne pratique de gestion durable des terres. La convention a été signée par Kardhiata Lo N’Diaye, la représentante du Système des Nations Unies au Togo, en présence d’André Johnson, le ministre de l’Environnement. Le projet vise à favoriser les initiatives communautaires innovantes tout en renforçant les moyens d’existence des populations. ‘Ce programme est pour nous d’une importance capitalee car il permet de soutenir des projets développés à la base par des acteurs à la base en lien direct avec les populations concernées’, a déclaré Mm Lo N’Diaye.

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Climate Adaptation Finance Update: MDBs Approve Projects with Co-benefits

IISD

Wednesday 10 January 2018

In Afghanistan, a US$71 million project financed by the LDCF, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the World Bank, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Afghan government, will focus on boosting the climate resilience of women and marginalized groups through measures in four areas: enhancing gender-sensitive disaster risk reduction at the community level; establishing community-based early warning systems; promoting climate-resilient agricultural practices and livelihoods; and working with government institutions at various levels on integrating climate change into planning. According to the UNDP, an estimated 80% of Afghanistan’s economic losses are caused by climate-induced disasters and extreme winters, and 75% of Afghans rely on agriculture for their livelihoods... The Global Environment Facility (GEF) wrote how a project in Liberia, supported by the UNDP and GEF-administered LDCF, which aimed to enhance the climate resilience of vulnerable coastal areas and communities, resulted in the construction of a 600-meter breakwater revetment that has reduced the vulnerability of thousands of families. The project will be replicated in another Liberian coastal community in 2018. [GEF Press Release]

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One million Malawians in need of food support-DodMA

Maravi Post

Wednesday 10 January 2018

In addition, under the 6-year- US$ 16, 264, 545 Scaling up the use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems (M-CLIMES Project), with funds from the Green Climate Fund and the UNDP, the Department is working on expanding networks that generate climate-related data to save lives and safeguard livelihoods from extreme climate events, development and dissemination of products and platforms for climate-related information/services for vulnerable communities and livelihoods; and strengthening communities’ capacities for use of early warning systems and climate information in preparedness for response to climate related disasters, among others.

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DevExplains: Green Climate Funds

Devex

Tuesday 9 January 2018

"What's interesting is that it's not just a single switch from maize to something else," said UNDP's Kurukulasuriya. "It's the likely means to switch again over time as conditions continue to change. This is part of the problem with climate change. It's not just that change is occurring, but that change is occurring at a faster rate than it has in mankind's lifetime. The need to have that flexibility to understand what's happening around you and to change with that at the right time, becomes an incredibly important part of the armoury that countries now have to develop." Assessing whether or not an impact is climate related requires undertaking a significant amount of climate modeling work or analysis, which Kurukulasuriya said is one of the major challenges that developing countries struggle with. Other common challenges, he notes, include lack of historical data at the community level and lack of technical capacity for forecasting the impacts of climate change as well as the effects of adaptation in both the near- and long-term. "So it becomes a question of ‘what can we do on top of what's already been done to ensure that these additional risks of climate change are managed better?’" said Pradeep Kurukulasuriya, head of climate change and adaptation programming at UNDP For organizations and developing countries still intent on formulating an adaptation proposal, the best way to pinpoint what adaptation finance should focus on is by first establishing a development baseline, then doing additionality reasoning in terms of management of risks associated with climate change hazards, advises Kurulasuriya. Establishing a baseline entails looking at what is being done today to address the non-climate change related drivers of the underlying problem and what is likely to happen without any additional interventions, given the reality unfolding in terms of climate change — that is, the likely range of effects or impacts. Then, in order to establish the “climate change additionality” rationale of a project, organizations have to identify those additional results that need to be achieved to minimize the effects of specific climate change induced impacts. This thought process is what allows one to formulate and justify the importance of select adaptation interventions that address the drivers that are directly attributable to climate change. "So it becomes a question of ‘what can we do on top of what's already been done to ensure that these additional risks of climate change are managed better?’" said Kurukulasuriya. "When you do that, you realize there's a lot of co-benefits to other development gains that you're also interested in achieving, such as women's empowerment, and you try to maximize those as much as possible."

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