Climate Change Adaptation in the News

April 2018

April 2018

Building the capacity of local communities

Samoa Observer

Monday 16 April 2018

Four hundred representatives from villages and community organisations in Samoa, participated in a ‘Call for Proposals’ Workshops’ by the UNDP Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme. The main goal of the workshops was to familiarise, inform, and build the local communities capacity on how they can obtain and utilize financial assistance to address their environmental challenges.

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Village of Faleu Manono, Samoa, celebrates new climate-resilient wharf

Samoa Observer

Saturday 14 April 2018

Phase one of the Faleu Wharf renovation project has been completed and it was a cause for celebration at the village yesterday. The reconstruction began in October last year. The Mormon Welfare Society was the first to donate $25,000 for the project with the Ministry of Finance, through Ministry of Works, Transport and Infrastructure and Samoa Ports Authority, gave $50,000. The United Nations Development Programme (adaptation funds), through Civil Society Support Programme, donated $50,000. The Government of Canada, through Canada Fund, ($62,723), Government of New Zealand, through their High Commission, ($25,000), Hamrock Contruction ($1,000) and the community of Faleu Manono, fundraised $12,713 for the project.

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The fall and rise of water and weather monitoring services

The Monitor Uganda

Friday 13 April 2018

Weather and water monitoring services are two distinct areas that have been prioritized at some point and neglected at another in Uganda. During the colonial time, meteorological (weather) and hydrological (water) services were priority areas and closely monitored in the country. As such there were well established water monitoring stations in places like Butiaba on Lake Albert, Pajule in the upper Nile, Jinja, Bukoba and Kisumu on Lake Victoria. “During the 1960s, rural water was decentralized in the districts, where the Department of Water was dealing with hydrology and valley tanks in support of agriculture,” Mr Patrick Kahangire, the presidential advisor on water says. “However, with the collapse of the East African Community in the 1970s, all water related activities were brought together under the Department of Water,” he adds.

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Principles in Practice: Integrating Adaptation into Long-term Strategies

WRI

Thursday 12 April 2018

Integrating climate change adaptation into long-term planning is key to securing social and economic development, as the impacts of climate change are already affecting development outcomes. We see this throughout the world as the number of floods and droughts increase in frequency and intensity, threatening livelihoods, human health, economies, and infrastructure. In order to adequately address these emerging climate risks, new ways of planning for the future are required. For example, coastal planning needs to anticipate the effects of sea level rise. Job-creation efforts in rural settings must take into account the impact of climate change on different parts of the value chain and on the resources that feed into the value chain. Take Cambodia and Niger, two countries expected to be impacted severely by climate change, where early steps have been taken to adapt. In Cambodia, agricultural planning is addressing inconsistent water access through promoting private sector investment and the diffusion of green technologies such as solar water pumps and water-efficient irrigation. In Niger, new varieties of drought-resilient seeds have been disseminated along with training and investment to promote the diversification of livelihoods. Moving forward, in addition to these important steps, countries need to transition from energy-intensive economic growth to low-carbon growth with climate resilience. If we do not address adaptation in development planning decisions in the context of low-carbon growth, the impact of investments will be lost.

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The answer is in nature

UNDP

Tuesday 10 April 2018

What do people and trees have in common? They’re complex life systems, engineered by nature. Both are highly dependent on water to survive, and each is ultimately reliant on the other for secure access to life-sustaining H2O. Our blue planet is running out of freshwater, the life force that sustains us all. While 70 percent of the Earth is covered in water, only 3 percent of that is freshwater. And humans are consuming water at a rate faster than nature’s ability to replenish it. Our planet already has specially designed ecosystems to heal itself. The answer to our water challenges lies in nature’s technology, especially in its forests and trees.

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Sri Lankan President meets GCF Executive Director to boost climate action programme

Green Climate Fund

Monday 9 April 2018

Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena highlighted how national climate impacts are already emerging during a recent meeting with GCF Executive Director Howard Bamsey designed to enhance his country’s interaction with the Fund.

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Partnerships key to societal priorities

The Herald Zimbabwe

Monday 9 April 2018

Partnerships facilitate lasting wins for communities, as opposed to top-down implementation of externally developed projects. A tested approach that leverages skill and resources at multiple levels, partnerships are key to driving societal priorities, particularly at a time of climate change. Two seemingly disconnected groups – civil society, development agencies and Government who design and implement strategy on the one side, and villagers who try to understand and live with the strategy on the other – joining hands to deliver interventions that work. This process calls upon both parties to show commitment, listen to one another and recognise the value of the other’s skill and expertise. “The Scaling up Adaptation in Zimbabwe, with a focus on rural livelihoods” project, around which Oxfam in Zimbabwe convened civil society, smallholder farmers, Government departments and development agencies, has benefited from this multi-sectoral buy-in.

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Grappling with climate change in the kingdom of happiness

PreventionWeb

Friday 6 April 2018

For Bhutan, a tiny carbon-neutral country nestled in the Himalayas between India and China, climate change is not just an environmental problem but a serious challenge to sustainable development. Communities face a range of climate-related hazards: shrinking glaciers and water reservoirs; a higher incidence of diseases spread by mosquitos and floods; as well as more frequent flash floods, forest fires and landslides. For an overview of the changes, the challenges and the solutions, UNDP caught up recently with Secretary Chencho Norbu, head of the National Environment Commission Secretariat in Bangkok.

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Green Climate Fund support to agric, renewable energy vital to Zambia development – Chiteme

Lusaka Times

Friday 6 April 2018

Minister of National Development Planning Alexander Chiteme says the Green Climate Fund support to Zambia’s agriculture and renewable energy sectors will contribute to accelerating the country’s development. According to a statement released to the media by Mr Chibaula Silwamba, the Ministry’s Spokesperson, the Minister said the 19th Board meeting of the GCF in February this year approved two projects for Zambia in the agriculture and energy sectors, which are within the priority sectors of the Seventh National Development Plan (SNDP). “The Board approved US 32 million on ‘Strengthening climate resilience of agricultural livelihoods in Agro-Ecological Regions I and II in Zambia’,” Mr. Chiteme. “and, ‘the Zambia Renewable Energy Financing Framework Programme under the African Development Bank (AfDB) is worth US154 million, of which GCF contributed US 52.5million, is a project whose objective is to catalyze private sector investment in renewable energy sector, and accelerate the achievement of our electricity generation targets and the diversification of energy mix.” The Minister expressed optimism that the Strengthening climate resilience of agricultural livelihoods in Agro-Ecological Regions I and II will help support Zambia’s adaptation efforts. He said the aim of the project was to increase resilience of small holder farmers against impacts of climate change and variability by providing climate change information on time, to enable farmers plan appropriately.

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UNDP sets up 11 automatic weather monitoring stations in Liberia

Farmers Review Africa

Friday 6 April 2018

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has embarked on a project aimed at strengthening the gathering and dissemination of weather information to promote climate change resilience among smallholder farmers in Liberia. In a statement, the UNDP said working with the Liberian government, it has set up 11 automatic weather stations (AWS), 6 agro-meteorology stations, a lightning detection system, hydrological early warning system. The project, which includes the supply of software for integrated water resource management, is a component of the UNDP Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) programme. It is funded through the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund (GEF-LDCF).

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The hanging gardens of Colombia

ReliefWeb

Friday 6 April 2018

To insulate vulnerable communities from floods and restore wetlands, Colombia promotes the use of recycled materials, suspended gardens and climate-smart agriculture. “I have guavas, lemons, oranges, tangerines, coconuts, passion fruits, chilies, eggplants, yuccas, yams and rice,” says Doña Zoila Guerra, grey-streaked hair framing her sunburnt face. “Every year in December I sell yuccas, which are thin now, but will be good by Christmas.” She speaks proudly as she surveys the cilantro planted in the garden behind her house in the Cuenca Community in San Marcos, Sucre. In 2010, Colombia was hit by widespread flooding. The flood waters wiped out farms, and flows of contaminants from illegal mines damaged crops, poisoned fish and killed mangroves and trees, making it hard for families to put healthy food on the table.

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“A.C.T. Now Saint Lucia” Change Awareness Campaign Launched

The Voice Saint Lucia

Monday 2 April 2018

It advocates the urgent need to undergird climate change adaptation efforts with a culture of good governance at the individual, household and community levels. ACT Now Saint Lucia is an undertaking by UNDP in partnership with the Government of Saint Lucia, with funding support from the Government of Japan, through the Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership.

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Zambia working to fight climate change, meet Paris Agreement goals says UNDP

African Review

Monday 2 April 2018

Zambia is taking steps to address the impact of climate change, improve food security and meet its goals under the Paris Agreement according to a statement from the United Nations Development Programme The UNDP said in a statement that Zambia recently received US$32mn from the Green Climate Fund for a seven-year, US$137mn project to help about one million farmers mitigate the impact of climate change. “UNDP is dedicated to working with the Government and people of Zambia to support innovative ideas that reduce carbon emissions and better prepare communities for the impact of climate change,” Mandisa Mashologu, UNDP Zambia country director said. The country is also looking use better climate information in local decision making to reduce the impact of adverse weather on crops and boost production. “Many years ago, we predicted the weather and knew when to plant. But these days, the weather is unpredictable. Now the dry season can bring continuous rain while the hot season is too wet. The use of weather and climate information assisted me to plant in good time. I have increased maize production from less than a tonne per hectare to five tonnes per hectare,” said Roida Zulu, who lives in Mambwe district in Zambia’s Eastern Province. Local communities are also rethinking land use to address the impact of climate change in a country which sees frequent drought. “I am setting aside 12,000 hectares for community forest management and support for the regeneration of indigenous forest in my area. I will also encourage people to start raising trees and plant them in degraded forests,” said Chief Chitambo of the Serenje district in Central Zambia.

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Liberia’s NAP project is the first African project to be financed by the GCF.

IISD

Monday 2 April 2018

Liberia’s NAP project is the first African project to be financed by the Green Climate Fund (GCF). It aims to advance the NAP process for medium-term investment planning in climate-sensitive sectors, including agriculture, energy, waste management, forestry and health, and in coastal areas in Liberia. Implemented by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and national partners, it benefits from US$2.3 million in GCF funding. The project will work to strengthen institutional frameworks and coordination for implementation of the NAP process. It will seek to expand the knowledge base for scaling up adaptation, build capacity for mainstreaming adaptation into planning and budgeting processes and systems, and formulate public, private, national and international financing mechanisms to enhance adaptation efforts in the country.

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