Guinea-Bissau

 

In Guinea-Bissau the impact of those changes were already being felt in the economy for some time, especially due to a diminishing rainfall and the gradual rise in temperature. In terms of water resources, this can be seen in aquifers that have decreasing quantities of water and are more easily flooded by salt water, ground waters increasingly deeper and dried-up lakes; concerning the agrarian sector, production of Guinean staple food (rice), has diminished markedly, also due to the salinity and acidity of hydromorphous soils and the flooding of rice fields.

Due to the fact that climate changes exert a negative influence on the quality and quality of water resources through a reduction in rainfall. 14 projects were chosen in order to achieve these strategic objectives including those on the Diversification of Food Production and the Improvement in the Supply of Potable Water in Rural Areas.

Guinea-Bissau is situated on the West African coast (latitude 10º 59' N, between 13º 38´ and 16º 43´ W meridians). It has a surface of 36,125 kmÇ, maximum latitude of 193 km and a maximum longitude of 330 km. The country has common borders with Senegal to the north and Guinea-Conakry to the south and east, and has the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Its territory is divided into a continental zone and an insular one, the latter being constituted of a contiguous chain of islands - Jeta, Pecixe, Areias, Caiar, Como e Melo and the Bijagós archipelago, made up of 88 islands and islets of which only 21 are inhabited.

Participatory evaluations of vulnerability and adaptation carried out under NAPA preparation and based on various sector studies-diagnoses, revealed that the sectors that ensure means of subsistence to the overwhelming majority of Guineans and that constitute the basis variability in weather patterns, namely: the agrarian sector (agriculture, forests and livestock), water resources, fisheries and public health.

Related Content

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is working with the Government of Guinea-Bissau to ensure a new tranche of US$6 milion from the Global Environment Facility's Least Developed Countries Fund is used to improve climate services and early warning systems in this West African nation. The "Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau" project will work to enhance the capacity of the National Hydro-Meteorological Services (NHMS) in Guinea-Bissau, ensure the effective use of weather and water information to make early warnings, mainstream climate change information into long-term development plans, and work toward ensuring the sustainability of investments in new climate services.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POLYGON ((-15.018310587294 11.978606370702, -15.029296915418 11.946363139781, -14.996337931048 11.935614542432, -15.018310587294 11.978606370702)), POINT (-14.974365274802 11.935614542432))
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$6 million (proposed GEF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$63 million (Government of Guinea Bissau proposed co-financing)
Project Details: 

Guinea-Bissau consistently ranks among the most vulnerable countries in West Africa to climate change. The primary drivers of Guinea-Bissau’s climate vulnerability are physical exposure, dependence on agriculture and fishing. Guinea-Bissau is a rural country in which agriculture, forestry, fishing and livestock farming accounted for 49.1% of GDP in 2013. The economic wealth of Guinea-Bissau bases essentially in its natural capital.

Even by African standards, little industry exists in Guinea-Bissau. Most of the population (about 82 %) work as subsistence farmers in an agriculture sector that is undeveloped and is largely based on rudimentary technology. Furthermore, the agriculture sector is dominated by the cashew nut monoculture. Over the past three years, cashew nuts have dominated Guinea-Bissau’s agriculture and national exports. In 2013, cashew nut production generated 11.9% of the country’s GDP and cashew sales accounted for 87.7% of total exports. According to the World Food Programme, 80% of those living outside the city of Bissau currently make their living from cashew nuts, which they use to trade for rice and other staple products. This can lead to a crippling dependence on a single crop for entire communities, putting their livelihoods and even their ability to feed themselves at the mercy of the harvest and international cashew prices.

The fisheries also play a vital role for Guinea-Bissau’s government, with fees for fishing licenses providing 35% of government revenue. Climate change is predicted to have adverse effects on fisheries and fishing. Rising sea temperatures, changes in circulation, acidification and loss of nursery areas, are predicted to reduce fish populations. Meanwhile, in places with rich fisheries like Guinea-Bissau, the destruction of coral reefs and mangroves destroys fish spawning grounds, decreasing the availability of fish, limiting the livelihoods of fishermen, and leading to precarious food security.

Additionally, low-elevation coastal zones stand out as Guinea-Bissau’s indicator of physical vulnerability. Most of Guinea-Bissau’s terrain consists of coastal swamps and mangroves, and over 19% of its land area lies in areas less than 10 meters above sea level. Increased flooding and saltwater intrusion due to global sea level rise could potentially affect these areas. Climate change has already begun to affect coastal farmers through saltwater intrusion into their rice paddies. Because of this, farmers who can no longer grow rice have shifted into cashew production.

Like many of its West African neighbors, Guinea-Bissau faces rainy seasons and long dry seasons, with abrupt transitions. The West African monsoon that characterizes the region’s climate is less stable than its eastern counterpart, and long droughts such as those that affected the area during the 1970s and 1980s are possible. Northern Guinea-Bissau borders the Sahel region. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the long droughts that characterize the Sahel may be spreading to this region.

Guinea-Bissau is also subject to climate related disasters risk, such as floods, storms, droughts grasshopper blights, disease epidemics (cholera, meningitis, and malaria), and sea accidents due to increasing sea surges.

The cost of climate change and disasters is high in Guinea-Bissau. The cholera epidemic in 2008 affected 105,380 people with 3032 dead, the drought between 1987 and 2009 affected 132,000 people, floods affected 1,750 people in 2007, and tropical cyclones caused 2712 victims in 2009.

To allow Guinea-Bissau to better manage climate related challenges undermining economic growth and development, it is essential to address a number of pressing challenges. These include the needs to: enhance capacity of hydro-meteorological services and networks for predicting climatic events and associated risks; develop a more effective, efficient and targeted delivery of climate information including early warnings to both planners as well as communities living on the fringes of climate induced pressures; and support improved and timely preparedness and response to forecast climate-related risks and vulnerabilities.

These objectives require developing in-country robust weather and climate observation capability, including now-casting and forecasting infrastructure which can be rapidly deployed, is relatively easy to maintain, and simple to use. Such a weather and climate monitoring system can provide Guinea-Bissau with the capacity necessary to develop: (i) an early warning system for severe weather; (ii) real-time weather and hydrological monitoring; (iii) weather forecasting capabilities (Numerical Weather Prediction); (iv) agro-meteorological information and services (including integrated crop and pest management); (v) applications related to building and management of infrastructure; (vi) tailored products for the mining planning and management; (vii) risk informed land, air and maritime transport management; (viii) integrated water resources management; (ix) adaptive coastal zone and land management; and (x) adaptation planning and policy making processes.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced capacity of National Hydro-Meteorological Services (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change. 

Output 1.1. Installation or rehabilitation (as appropriate) of 08 Tide Gauge Stations and 17 Limnigraphic stations with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities

Output 1.2. Procurement and installation and/or rehabilitation of 40 meteorological monitoring stations, with telemetry, archiving and data processing facilities

Output 1.3. Procurement and installation of technology using lightning data for monitoring severe weather events

Output 1.4. Procurement and installation of maritime weather stations (AWS430), maritime observation console (MCC401), MetCast observation console (MCC301) in the 6 ports of Guinea Bissau

Output 1.5. Procurement and installation of 10-day site specific weather forecasting systems in the 12 major towns of Guinea Bissau

Output 1.6. Procurement and installation of satellite monitoring equipment to receive real time climate and environmental information

Output 1.7. Development and implementation of a capacity building program to provide Guinea-Bissau with the required capacity to operate and maintain the purchased equipment

Outcome 2 - Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming climate change into long-term development plans.  

Output 2.1. Development of a capacity building and institutional strengthening program to run hydrometeorological models and provide forecast and EW information

Output 2.2. Development of national capacity for integrating climate risk information into existing development planning and disaster management systems

Output 2.3. Development of a sustainable financing mechanism for the climate information production and dissemination system

Output 2.4. Development of new tailored climate information products for the users in the priority vulnerable sectors and locations (protected Areas, biodiversity hotspots, cash and areas agriculture, fisheries and natural capital), identified in coordination with the NAP process

Output 2.5. Integration of climate risks into the GB 2025 development strategy and related operational programs in coordination with the NAP process

Output 2.6. Development of an efficient and sustainable mechanism for sharing climate products and early warning information

Outcome 3 - Lessons learned by the project through participatory monitoring and evaluation, with special attention to gender mainstreaming, are made available to support the financial sustainability of the strategy.

Output 3.1. Project activities and impacts on global, national and local environmental benefits of MPA assessed and monitored.

Output 3.2. Project lessons and knowledge codified and disseminated nationally and internationally.

Output 3.3. Wider public awareness of climate services available and the benefits of their use achieved through comprehensive multimedia outreach and education campaigns

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Rene Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Enhanced capacity of National Hydro-Meteorological Services (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change. 

Outcome 2 - Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming climate change into  long-term development plans. 

Outcome 3 - Lessons learned by the project through participatory monitoring and evaluation, with special attention to gender mainstreaming, are made available to support the financial sustainability of the strategy.

Strengthening the Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau

The "Strengthening the Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau" Project will leverage a proposed US$12 million Global Environment Facility Least Developed Country Fund Grant to develop the strong institutions and policies needed to improve risk management in coastal zones, protect investments in coastal infrastructure and diffuse new technologies to strengthen resilience within coastal communities.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$ 12 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$26 million (including US$2.5 million from UNDP, US$14 million from World Bank, US$9.3 million from AFDB and US$300,000 from the Government of Guinea Bissau)
Project Details: 

According to Guinea-Bissau’s NAPA (2006), the primary drivers of the climate vulnerability of the coastal areas and communities are physical exposure, dependence on agriculture and fishing as main livelihood options, and poor governance. Low-elevation coastal zones are especially vulnerable in Guinea-Bissau. Most of Guinea-Bissau’s land consists of coastal swamps and mangroves, and over 19 percent of its land area lies in areas less than 10 meters above sea level. The majority of the population (about 82 %) work as subsistence farmers and climate change has already begun to affect coastal farmers through increased flooding and saltwater encroachment into their rice paddies due to global sea level rise. The coastal communities and the whole population of Guinea-Bissau rely on mangrove stands and coastal lowlands for rice cultivation as a main source of income and food.

A recent study (Sally Brown and all, 2011) has projected sea-level rises (in comparison of 1995 level) of 0.13 m, 0.35 m, 0.72 m and 1,22 m for 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 respectively. With a large and growing population in the coastal zone and a low adaptive capacity due to low national wealth and other development indicators, Guinea-Bissau appears to be highly vulnerable to sea-level rise. Without adaptation, the physical, human and financial impacts will be significant.

Sea-level rise has the potential to displace hundreds of thousands of people over the next 100 years. With a rise of 0.13 m in 2025, 77,800 people will be flooded per year. with a rise of 0.35 m in 2050, 179,800 persons will be flooded per year. The total cos t of sea-level rises for Guinea-Bissau combining costs of forced migration, land loss, salinization, sea floods and river floods will be US$8 million per year for 2025, US$29.9 million per year for 2050 and are estimated at US$361.8 million per year by 2100.

Climate change is predicted to also have adverse effects on fisheries and fishing. Rising sea temperatures and changes in the oceans’ other dynamics, such as acidification and loss of nursery areas, are predicted to reduce fish populations. Meanwhile, in places with rich fisheries like Guinea-Bissau, the destruction of coral reefs and mangroves destroys fish spawning grounds, decreasing the availability of fish, limiting the livelihoods of fishermen, and leading to precarious food security as sea foods are the main sources of proteins for the coastal communities.

To address these challenges, the preferred situation is for Guinea-Bissau to have the capacity at national, regional and local levels to develop, plan and implement coastal management measures that increase resilience of coastal communities’ livelihoods and economic activities to climate change induced risks. This would imply that the climate change risks and relevant adaptation options be mainstreamed in the coastal development policies, strategies and initiatives, and the decision makers and technical staffs of the line sectors. This would also mean that the coastal communities have the required institutional support and technical and economic capacity to gradually and sustainably transform their structures, functioning, social organization and economy in order to increase their capacity to absorb shocks as well as slowly manifestation changes that undermine economic development.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Policies, regulations institutions and individuals mandated to manage coastal areas strengthened to reduce the risk of climate change

Outcome 2 - Vulnerability of coastal investments to climate risks reduced through the design, construction and maintenance of coastal protection measures

Outcome 3 - Rural livelihoods in the coastal zone enhanced and protected from the impacts of climate change

Project Brief: Guinea-Bissau (August 2015)

This project brief gives an overview of the project, and details Issues, Actions, and Expected Impacts.

Supporting Guinea Bissau to advance their NAP Process

Status of assistance to Guinea Bissau for their NAP process:

  • A Government  delegation from Guinea Bissau attended the NAP-GSP Africa Regional Training Workshop (Anglophone) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in April 2014.
  • The government of Guinea Bissau requested support from the NAP-GSP in January 2014. Preliminary discussions took place with the government in July 2014 in coordination with the UNDP Country Office to initiate the NAP process. Guineu Bissau has identified a need for technical facilitation from the NAP-GSP in-country consultations on the NAP process.

More NAP-GSP countries / En savoir plus sur les pays PAG-PNA

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-15.556640645938 11.883047592718)
Funding Source: 
Project Details: 

PNA - expérience en adaptation au changement climatique

Présenté par la délégation du gouvernement du Guinée Bissau à la Atelier régional de formation en Afrique Organisé par le PAG-PNA - Addis Abeba, Ethiopie, 21-24 Avril 2014.
 
Project Status: 
Information in French / Informations en français: 

Etat de l’appui au processus PNA de la Guinée Bissau:

  • Une délégation du gouvernement du Bénin a assisté à la Atelier régional de formation en Afrique Organisé par le PAG-PNA - Addis Abeba, Ethiopie, 21-24 Avril 2014.
  • Le Gouvernement de Guinée Bissau a fait une demande d’appui du PAG-PNA en janvier 2014. Des discussions préliminaires ont eu lieu avec le gouvernement en Juillet 2014 à la coordination avec le Bureau de pays du PNUD pour lancer le processus du PAN. Les prochaines étapes consisteront à soutenir les consultations dans le pays sur le processus de NAP basés sur plus de raffinement d'un cadre de référence.

PNA - expérience en adaptation au changement climatique
Présenté par la délégation du gouvernement du Guinée Bissau à la Atelier régional de formation en Afrique Organisé par le PAG-PNA - Addis Abeba, Ethiopie, 21-24 Avril 2014.

 
Display Photo: 

Guinea-Bissau- Second National Communication

The creation of a National Communication offers countries the opportunity to contribute with technically sound studies and information that can be used for designing mitigation and adaptation measures, and project proposals that can and will help increase their resilience to the impacts of climate change. Activities generally include: V&A assessments, Greenhouse Gas Inventory preparation, Mitigation Analysis or Education, and awareness raising activities.The ultimate goal is the integration of climate change considerations into relevant social, economic and environmental policies and actions.

Key Vulnerabilities identified in Guinea-Bissau's Second National Communication (2011):

  • Agriculture and food security
  • Water resources
  • Coastal zones and marine ecosystems
  • Forestry
  • Tourism

 

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-15.5786071727 11.8526507852)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Assessments and Background Documents
Project Details: 

Potential adaptation measures identified in Guinea-Bissau's Second National Communication (2011):

Agriculture and food security

  • Improved water management (through the promotion of irrigation and integrated water resources management). 
  • Sustainable development of agriculture (components: Integrated management and soil fertility, strengthening of support services to producers and dissemination of improved technologies).
  • Improved management of other natural resources (components: organization of transhumance and route planning, sustainable management of forest resources and sustainable management of fisheries’ resources).

Forestry

  • Monitoring of forests, based on research and application of credible technologies;
  • The productive potential of the site, the extent of the growth period and the duration of the dry season should be the determining factors in the choice of species for use in reforestation and drought tolerance;
  • The best places should be reserved for demanding species with regard to soil moisture;
  • Reforestation with advisable orientation may increase the likelihood of survival of trees;
  • In the scenario of temperature increase, which imply an increase of forest fires, we should promote the early warning system for risks of fire;
  • Establishment of a regulatory and effective tax on wood for energy;
  • Plantations of species with high calorific value and high growth

Water Resources

  • Promote studies to evaluate the possibilities of building dams to retain rainwater in order to avoid the loss of these into the rivers, seas and ocean;
  • Conduct a comprehensive study on the capabilities and characteristics of the river system (tributaries and small flowing streams) with the intention of its use for irrigation and construction of small dams to hold water for agriculture and livestock breeding;
  • Construction of small ramps on the banks of the tributaries of the Geba River, in order to allow animals to drink the waters of these rivers;
  • Organization and awareness to change mentality (creation of water user associations), to improve the level of knowledge of water resources (hydrology and hydrogeology) and its operation (training);

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Sustainable development and the integration of climate change concerns into medium- and long-term planning
  • Inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases
  • Measures contributing to addressing climate change
  • Research and systematic observation
  • Climate change impacts, adaptation measures and response strategies
  • Education, training and public awareness
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

In 1992, countries joined an international treaty, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to cooperatively consider what they could do to limit average global temperature increases and the resulting climate change, and to cope with whatever impacts were, by then, inevitable.

Parties to the Convention must submit national reports on implementation of the Convention to the Conference of the Parties (COP). The required contents of national communications and the timetable for their submission are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. This is in accordance with the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities" enshrined in the Convention.

The core elements of the national communications for both Annex I and non-Annex I Parties are information on emissions and removals of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and details of the activities a Party has undertaken to implement the Convention. National communications usually contain information on national circumstances, vulnerability assessment, financial resources and transfer of technology, and education, training and public awareness.

Since 1994, governments have invested significant time and resources in the preparation, collection and validation of data on GHG emissions, and the COP has made determined efforts to improve the quality and consistency of the data, which are ensured by established guidelines for reporting. Non-Annex I Parties receive financial and technical assistance in preparing their national communications, facilitated by the UNFCCC secretariat.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Yamil Bonduki
Coordinator, National Communications Support Programme (NCSP)
Government of Guinea-Bissau
Alexandre Cabral
Country Contact
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
TRUST
Project Status: 

Guinea-Bissau National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA)

National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) provide a process for Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to identify priority activities that respond to their immediate needs to adapt to climate change, ultimately leading to the implementation of projects aimed at reducing the economic and social costs of climate change.

For Guinea-Bissau, the main Climate Related Hazards identified in the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) include:

  • Seasonal drought
  • Acute Drought
  • Rise in Ocean Temperature
  • Rise in Atmosphere Temperature
  • Cyclones
  • Average Sea Level Rise
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-15.603314193901 11.864633130517)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved capacity building and project identification, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
200,000
Assessments and Background Documents
Co-Financing Total: 
10,000
Project Details: 

In Guinea-Bissau the impacts of climate change have been already been having noticeable effects on the local economy for some time, especially due to a diminishing rainfall and the gradual rise in temperature. In terms of water resources, this can be seen in aquifers experiencing decreasing quantities of water and are more easily flooded by salt water, ground waters increasingly deeper and dried-up lakes. Concerning the agrarian sector, production of Guinean staple food (rice), has diminished markedly, also due to the salinity and acidity of hydromorphous soils and the flooding of rice fields.

Due to the fact that climate changes exert a negative influence on the quality and quality of water resources through a reduction in rainfall. 14 projects were chosen in order to achieve these strategic objectives including those on the Diversification of Food Production and the Improvement in the Supply of Potable Water in Rural Areas.

Participatory evaluations of vulnerability and adaptation carried out under NAPA preparation and based on various sector studies-diagnoses, revealed that the sectors that ensure means of subsistence to the overwhelming majority of Guineans and that constitute the basis variability in weather patterns, namely: the agrarian sector (agriculture, forests and livestock), water resources, fisheries and public health.

Guinea-Bissau is situated on the West African coast (latitude 10º 59' N, between 13º 38´ and 16º 43´ W meridians). It has a surface of 36,125 square-km, maximum latitude of 193 km and a maximum longitude of 330 km. The country has common borders with Senegal to the north and Guinea-Conakry to the south and east, and has the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Its territory is divided into a continental zone and an insular one, the latter being constituted of a contiguous chain of islands - Jeta, Pecixe, Areias, Caiar, Como e Melo and the Bijagós archipelago, made up of 88 islands and islets of which only 21 are inhabited.

Climate Related Hazards

  • Seasonal drought
  • Acute Drought
  • Rise in Ocean Temperature
  • Rise in Atmosphere Temperature
  • Cyclones
  • Average Sea Level Rise

Main Human Vulnerabilities and Livelihood Impacts

  • Agriculture
  • Livestock
  • Forests
  • Water Resources
  • Fishery Depletion
  • Coastal Zone
  • Sanitation
  • Public Health
  • Food security
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Priority Adaptation Projects

  • Rehabilitation and/or construction of protective dams and dykes
  • Implementation and Mobilization of water management associations
  • Support to the intensification of crop and livestock production
  • Implementation of erosion control measures through soil conservation techniques and dune stabilization
  • Implementation of simple structure and/or capacity building plan for the decentralized Meteorological service
  • Implementation of dams and dykes to control the gradual rise of sea level
  • Rehabilitation of degraded coastal areas
  • Reforestation of rural areas with their specific reforestation plans based on locally appropriate species
  • Promoting the transfer of forest management to local communities (GELOSE, GCF)
  • Implementation of communication infrastructure in areas of high potential production capacity to increase exchange and trade
  • Promoting the use of information*, education* and communication*sharing systems to reach rural communities
  • Promoting the use of communication system to educate and raise awareness on health issues among the population
  • Implementation of Capacity building to strengthen the health system
  • Mobilization of necessary resources to prevent and control disease vectors
  • Elaboration of, Information-sharing and awareness raising on the design and construction principles about infrastructures adapted to climate change

Priority Options in the Agricultural Sector (Crop Production Sub-Sector)

  • Extension of short-cycle seeds
  • Greater dissemination of varieties less demanding in water and resistant to prolonged drought periods
  • Increase in hydraulic works
  • Construction of micro dams and small dykes for water retention
  • Promotion of low-cost irrigation systems
  • Production diversification

Priority Options in Water Resources Management

  • Rehabilitation, renewal and extension of needed infrastructure for a quantitative and qualitative improvement of water and sanitation resources
  • Rehabilitation and implementation of infrastructure for the evacuation of rain water and the evacuation of residual water in critical locations in large urban centres
  • Organization and sensitisation of populations for a change in mental attitudes (setting up of water-consumer associations); better knowledge on water resources (hydro-geology and hydrology) and their functioning (Training)
  • Effective protection of those resources and their tapping for supply purposes
  • Effective and integrated management of different ways to utilise water
  • Institutional organization, reactivation of CTA, CIMA and CNA
  • Legislation updating

Priority Options in Forest and Woodland Management

  • Launching of nationwide survey on forests
  • Setting-up of conservation units, especially in important and fragile ecosystems
  • Promotion of local initiatives focusing on conservation and development
  • Supply of financial and technical means to technical services
  • Introduction of community-based management of forests and their extension to the north and south of the country
  • Selection of rapid-growth species plants for energy purposes
  • Reforesting of zones degraded and their restoring through the use in each agro-ecological zone of local species plus sustainable management of those species thus allowing their future natural regeneration

Priority Options in the Coastal Zone Management

  • A requirement to guide traditional and modern techniques in research, experimenting and base studies for the exploitation of sea resources with a view to ensuring the sustainable use of stocks of commercial importance thus reducing pressure on those resources
  • In order to minimize its sea fauna vulnerability to climate changes, the country needs to define an efficient management of its living sea resources aiming at: * Making use of actors’ good sense when faced with shortage of scientific information
  • An immediate implementation of conservation measures before obtaining reliable data and reaching scientific consensus (which requires a long timeframe) on the status of sea resources
  • Promotion experimental aquaculture in coastal areas

Priority Options in the Fisheries Sector

  • Preparation of an Integrated Management Programme of Coastal Resources (PGIRC), and its respective Plan of Action on the Coast (PAC).
  • Acquisition of knowledge on intern al dynamics of populations of sea resources in the area
  • Integrated management of those resources and respective zone
  • Appropriate legislation to ensure protection of resources, particularly regarding their access and assessment of local hydro-meteorological risks

Priority Options in the Energy Sector

  • Fuelwood saving stoves
  • Expanded use of Liquefied Petroleum Gas and Ethanol
  • Charcoal saving stoves
  • Electricity saving devices 
  • Development of renewables

Priority Options in the Health Sector

  • Building of disease research centres
  • Strengthening of measures to fight and prevent the on-set of diseases among populations
  • Designing of a broader vision on the issues of climate sensitive diseases
  • Promotion of capacity building in research
  • Strengthening of health-information system aiming at obtaining global and complete data about the epidemiological situation.

Priority Options in Food Security

  • Setting up of national security stock
  • Setting up of cereal banks (silos) by peasants to guarantee a food reserve in all regions
  • Setting up of an Early Warning System against risks
  • Strengthening of sensitisation campaign about the importance of diversifying eating habits

Expected Outputs:

  • Identify concerted and integrated priority actions based on the urgent and immediate adaptation needs to negative climate change impacts
  • Widely disseminate adaptation activities with partners, stakeholders and beneficiaries
  • Strengthen adaptation capacities of communities affected in vulnerable areas
  • Develop synergies between the various strategic frameworks in the area of adaptation to climate change
  • Assist in the preparation of the second national communication.

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Dauda Sau
Country Officer
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

UNDP Guinea-Bissau Project Document

The Project Document, from March 2011, gives detailed information on the project - "Strengthening resilience and adaptive capacity to climate change in Guinea-Bissau’s agrarian and water sectors". The ProDoc includes a Situation Analysis, with the Global, National and Regional Context, Climate Change Context, Past and Ongoing Activities in the country, Related Donor Assistance, and a Barrier Analysis.